Lamentation (Psalms of Isaak Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

An ancient weapon has completely destroyed the city of Windwir. From many miles away, Rudolfo, Lord of the Nine Forest Houses, sees the horrifying column of smoke rising. He knows that war is coming to the Named Lands.

Nearer to the Devastation, a young apprentice is the only survivor of the city – he sat waiting for his father outside the walls, and was transformed as he watched everyone he knew die in an instant.

Soon all the Kingdoms of the ...

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Lamentation (Psalms of Isaak Series #1)

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Overview

An ancient weapon has completely destroyed the city of Windwir. From many miles away, Rudolfo, Lord of the Nine Forest Houses, sees the horrifying column of smoke rising. He knows that war is coming to the Named Lands.

Nearer to the Devastation, a young apprentice is the only survivor of the city – he sat waiting for his father outside the walls, and was transformed as he watched everyone he knew die in an instant.

Soon all the Kingdoms of the Named Lands will be at each others' throats, as alliances are challenged and hidden plots are uncovered.

This remarkable first novel from an award-winning short fiction writer will take readers away to a new world – an Earth so far in the distant future that our time is not even a memory; a world where magick is commonplace and great areas of the planet are impassable wastes. But human nature hasn’t changed through the ages: War and faith and love still move princes and nations.

At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Scholes's mesmerizing debut novel, the first installment of the five-volume Psalms of Isaak saga, launches him into the stratosphere of contemporary epic fantasy. Fueled by an impressively serpentine story line that explores deep philosophical issues of knowledge and power, the novel begins with a literal bang: Windwir, "the world's greatest city" and home of 200,000 people as well as the famed Androfrancine Order and its enormous library, is completely destroyed by a mysterious weapon unleashed by an unknown foe. Left oddly untouched are the Androfrancines' mechoservitors, one of whom, Isaak, may be the only one who knows what happened and why. Readers will be intrigued by the subtle, adept world building and ensemble cast of brilliantly complex characters, but it's Scholes's pure storytelling prowess that makes this tale of devastation and retribution so unforgettable. (Feb.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

As an ancient weapon destroys the city of Windwir, a young apprentice watches from a nearby hilltop, mourning the death of the city and his father. When Rudolfo, Lord of the Nine Forest Houses, realizes what has happened, he knows for certain that the land will soon be plunged into a devastating war. The author of Last Flight of the Goddess launches a new series with the startling image of mass destruction, and the action only builds from there. Richly detailed and original in concept, Scholes's epic fantasy belongs in most libraries.


—Jackie Cassada
From the Publisher
“This is the golden age of fantasy, with a dozen masters doing their best work.  Then along comes Ken Scholes, with his amazing clarity, power, and invention, and shows us all how it's done.  No more ponderous plotting - Scholes barely gives us time to breathe.  Yet he creates vivid characters, a world thick with detail, and wonders we've never seen before.  I wish my first novel had been this good.  I wish all five volumes of this series were already published so I could read them now.”— Orson Scott Card

“Ken Scholes is a hot new voice to watch for on the interesting frontier between science fiction and fantasy.  He has a keen eye for action and a keen ear for the sounds of the human heart.  Grab on now, because he's going places.”—Harry Turtledove

"As intricate as a Whymer maze, Ken Scholes' Lamentation will keep the reader up until the wee hours, winding through this splendid labyrinth.  Bravo!"—Dennis L. McKiernan, bestselling author of the Mithgar series

"Ken Scholes's Lamentation is an iconic SF story cloaked in fantasy, drawing raw material from classics such as A Canticle for Liebowitz and Earth Abides, but forging something new, with colorful characters, compelling scenes, and unfolding miracles."—Kevin J. Anderson, bestselling co-author of Sandworms of Dune

"Ken Scholes' Lamentation is a whale of a first novel, set in a world where technological magic has come and gone, and come again, where organized religion has attempted to recover and restore lost knowledge, if with a certain amount of censorship, where no one is quite what they seem, and where parental ambitions for offspring are filled with deep love and sacrifices, along with double double-crosses, conflicting motives, and tragedy."—L.E. Modesitt, Jr.

“The tone of [Lamentation] is precise and just about exactly right: I was engaged from the opening page, stayed up late looking to finish it, and then begged Scholes to let me see the next book as soon as possible…. I’d describe it as intelligent epic fantasy done right and written with all of the flab removed. It’s nothing like George Martin’s first Song of Ice and Fire novel, except that like that book, it has the chance of standing as an important book in the evolution of the epic fantasy form, is a delight, and is a book that readers are very likely to take to heart. It’s one of the best first fantasies I’ve read in some time.”—Jonathan Strahan

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429992008
  • Publisher: Doherty, Tom Associates, LLC
  • Publication date: 2/17/2009
  • Series: Psalms of Isaak Series , #1
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 107,844
  • File size: 951 KB

Meet the Author

Ken Scholes's short fiction has been appearing in various magazines and anthologies for the last eight years, including Realms of Fantasy, Polyphony 6 and Weird Tales. He is a winner of the Writers of the Future contest. Ken’s background includes service in two branches of the military, a degree in history, a brief stint as a clergyman, an even briefer stint as a label-gun repairman and over ten years experience managing nonprofit organizations. Originally from the Puget Sound area, Ken currently lives in Gresham, Oregon, with his amazing wonder-wife Jen, two cats, five guitars, and more books than you’d ever want to help him move.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter

1

Rudolfo

Wind swept the Prairie Sea and Rudolfo chased after it, laughing and riding low in the saddle as he raced his Gypsy Scouts. The afternoon sun glinted gold on the bending grass and the horses pounded out their song.

Rudolfo savored the wide yellow ocean of grass that separated the Ninefold Forest Houses from one another and from the rest of the Named Lands—it was his freedom in the midst of duty, much as the oceans must have been for the seagoing lords of the Elder Days. He smiled and spurred his stallion.

It had been a fine time in Glimmerglam, his first Forest House. Rudolfo had arrived before dawn. He’d taken his breakfast of goat cheese, whole grain bread and chilled pear wine beneath a purple canopy that signified justice. While he ate, he heard petitions quietly as Glimmerglam’s steward brought the month’s criminals forward. Because he felt particularly benevolent, he sent two thieves into a year’s servitude to the shop keepers they’d defiled, while sending the single murderer to his Physicians of Penitent Torture on Tormentor’s Row. He dismissed three cases of prostitution and then afterward, hired two of them onto his monthly rotation.

By lunchtime, Rudolfo had proven Aetero’s Theory of Compensatory Seduction decidedly false and he celebrated with creamed pheasant served over brown rice and wild mushrooms.

Then with his belly full, he’d ridden out with a shout, his Gypsy Scouts racing to keep up with him.

A good day indeed.

"What now," the Captain of his Gypsy Scouts asked him, shouting above the pounding hooves.

Rudolfo grinned. "What say you, Gregoric?"

Gregoric returned the smile and it made his scar all the more ruthless. His black scarf of rank trailed out behind him, ribboning on the wind. "We’ve seen to Glimmerglam, Rudoheim and Friendslip. I think Paramo is the closest."

"Then Paramo it is." That would be fitting, Rudolfo thought. It couldn’t come close to Glimmerglam’s delights, but it had held on to its quaint, logging village atmosphere for at least a thousand years and that was an accomplishment. They floated their timber down the Rajblood River just as they had in the first days, retaining what they needed to build some of the world’s most intricately crafted woodwork. The lumber for Rudolfo’s manors came from the trees of Paramo. The furniture they made rolled out by the wagonload and the very best found its way into the homes of kings and priests and nobility from all over the Named Lands.

He would dine on roast boar to night, listen to the boasting and flatulence of his best men, and sleep on the ground with a saddle beneath his head—the life of a Gypsy King. And tomorrow, he’d sip chilled wine from the navel of a log camp dancer, listen to the frogs in the river shallows mingled with her sighs, and then sleep in the softest of beds on the summer balcony of his third forest manor.

Rudolfo smiled.

But as he rounded to the south, his smile faded. He reined in and squinted against the sunlight. The Gypsy Scouts followed his lead, whistling to their horses as they slowed, stopped and then pranced.

"Gods," Gregoric said. "What could cause such a thing?"

Southwest of them, billowing up above the horizon of forest-line that marked Rudolfo’s farthest border, a distant pillar of black smoke rose like a fist in the sky.

Rudolfo stared and his stomach lurched. The size of the smoke cloud daunted him; it was impossible. He blinked as his mind unlocked enough for him to do the math, quickly calculating the distance and direction based on the sun and the few stars strong enough to shine by day.

"Windwir," he said, not even aware that he was speaking.

Gregoric nodded. "Aye, General. But what could do such a thing?"

Rudolfo looked away from the cloud to study his captain. He’d known Gregoric since they were boys, and had made him the youngest captain of the Gypsy Scouts at fifteen when Rudolfo himself was just twelve. They’d seen a lot together, but Rudolfo had never seen him pale before now.

"We’ll know soon enough," Rudolfo said. Then he whistled his men in closer. "I want riders back to each of the houses to gather the Wandering Army. We have kin-clave with Windwir; their birds will be flying. We’ll meet on the Western Steppes in one day; we’ll be to Windwir’s aid in three."

"Are we to magick the scouts, General?"

Rudolfo stroked his beard. "I think not." He thought for a moment. "But we should be ready," he added.

Gregoric nodded and barked out the orders.

As the nine Gypsy Scouts rode off, Rudolfo slipped from the saddle, watching the dark pillar. The column of smoke, as wide as a city, disappeared into the sky.

Rudolfo, Lord of the Ninefold Forest Houses, General of the Wandering Army, felt curiosity and fear dance a shiver along his spine.

"What if it’s not there when we arrive?" he asked himself.

And he knew—but did not want to—that it wouldn’t be, and that because of this, the world had changed.

Petronus

Petronus mended the last of the net and tucked it away in the prow of his boat. Another quiet day on the water, another day of little to show for it, but he was happy with that.

Tonight, he’d dine at the inn with the others, eating and drinking too much and finally breaking down into the raunchy limericks that made him famous up and down the coast of Caldus Bay. Petronus didn’t mind being famous for that at all. Outside of his small village, most had no idea that more fame than that lay just beneath the surface.

Petronus the Fisherman had lived another life before returning to his nets and his boat. Prior to the day he chose to end that life, Petronus had lived a lie that, at times, felt more true than a child’s love. Nonetheless, it was a lie that ate away at him until he stood up to it and laid it out thirty-three years ago.

Next week, he realized with a smile. He could go months without thinking about it now. When he was younger, it wasn’t so. But each year, about a month before the anniversary of his rather sudden and creative departure, memories of Windwir, of its Great Library, of its robed Order, flooded him and he found himself tangled up in his past like a gull in a net.

The sun danced on the water, and he watched the silver waves flash against the hulls of ships both small and large. Overhead, a clear blue sky stretched as far as he could see and seabirds darted, shrieking their hunger as they dove for the small fish that dared swim near the surface.

One particular bird—a kingfisher—caught his eye and he followed it as it dipped and weaved. He turned with it, watching as it flexed its wings and glided, pushed back by a high wind that Petronus couldn’t see or feel.

I’ve been pushed by such a wind, he thought, and with that thought, the bird suddenly shuddered in the air as the wind overcame it and pushed it farther back.

Then Petronus saw the cloud piling up on the horizon to the northwest.

He needed no mathematics to calculate the distance. He needed no time at all to know exactly what it was and what it meant.

Windwir.

Stunned, he slid to his knees, his eyes never leaving the tower of smoke that rose westward and north of Caldus Bay. It was close enough that he could see the flecks of fire in it as it roiled and twisted its way into the sky.

" ‘Oh my children,’ " Petronus whispered, quoting the First Gospel of P’Andro Whym, " ‘what have you done to earn the wrath of heaven?’ "

Jin Li Tam

Jin Li Tam bit back her laughter and let the fat Overseer try to reason with her.

"It’s not seemly," Sethbert said, "for the consort of a king to ride sidesaddle."

She did not bother to remind him of the subtle differences between an Overseer and a king. Instead, she stayed with her point. "I do not intend to ride sidesaddle, either, my lord."

Jin Li Tam had spent most of the day cramped into the back of a carriage with the Overseer’s entourage and she’d had enough of it. There was an army of horses to be had—saddles, too—and she meant to feel the wind on her face. Besides, she could see little from the inside of a carriage and she knew her father would want a full report.

A captain interrupted, pulling Sethbert aside and whispering urgently. Jin Li Tam took it as her cue to slip away in search of just the right horse—and to get a better idea of what was afoot.

She’d seen the signs for over a week. Messenger birds coming and going, cloaked couriers galloping to and fro at all hours of the night. Long meetings between old men in uniforms, hushed voices and then loud voices, and hushed voices again. And the army had come together quickly, brigades from each of the City States united under a common flag. Now, they stretched ahead and behind on the Whymer Highway, overflowing the narrow road to trample the fields and forests in their forced march north.

Try as she might, she had no idea why. But she knew the scouts were magicked, and according to the Rites of Kin-Clave, that meant Sethbert and the Entrolusian City States were marching to war. And she also knew that very little lay north apart from Windwir—the great seat of the Androfrancine Order—and farther north and east, Rudolfo’s Ninefold Forest Houses. But both of those neighbors were Kin-Clave with the Entrolusians, and she’d not heard of any trouble they might be in that merited Entrolusian intervention.

Of course, Sethbert had not been altogether rational of late.

Though she cringed at the thought of it, she’d shared his bed enough to know that he was talking in his sleep and restless, unable to rise to the challenge of his young redheaded consort. He was also smoking more of the dried kallaberries, intermittently raging and rambling with his officers. Yet they followed him, so there had to be something. He didn’t possess the charm or charisma to move an army on his own and he was too lazy to move them by ruthlessness, while lacking in the more favorable motivational skills.

"What are you up to?" she wondered out loud.

"Milady?" A young cavalry lieutenant towered over her on a white mare. He had another horse in tow behind him.

She smiled, careful to turn in such a way that he could see down her top just far enough to be rewarded, but not so far as to be improper. "Yes, Lieutenant?"

"Overseer Sethbert sends his compliments and requests that you join him forward." The young man pulled the horse around, offering her the reins.

She accepted and nodded. "I trust you will ride with me?"

He nodded. "He asked me to do so."

Climbing into the saddle, she adjusted her riding skirts and stretched up in the stirrups. Twisting, she could make out the end of the long line of soldiers behind and before her. She nudged the horse forward. "Then let’s not keep the Overseer waiting."

Sethbert waited at a place where the highway crested a rise. She saw the servants setting up his scarlet canopy at the road’s highest point and wondered why they were stopping here, in the middle of nowhere.

He waved to her as she rode up. He looked flushed, even excited. His jowls shook and sweat beaded on his forehead. "It’s nearly time," he said. "Nearly time."

Jin looked at the sky. The sun was at least four hours from setting. She looked back at him, then slid from the saddle. "Nearly time for what, my lord?"

They were setting up chairs now for them, pouring wine, preparing platters. "Oh you’ll see," Sethbert said, placing his fat behind into a chair that groaned beneath him.

Jin Li Tam sat, accepted wine and sipped.

"This," Sethbert said, "is my finest hour." He looked over to her and winked. His eyes had that glazed over, faraway look they sometimes had during their more intimate moments. A look she wished she could afford the luxury of having during those moments as well and still be her father’s spy.

"What—" But she stopped herself. Far off, beyond the forests and past the glint of the Third River as it wound its way northward, light flashed in the sky and a small crest of smoke began to lift itself on the horizon. The small crest expanded upward and outward, a column of black against the blue sky that kept growing and growing.

Sethbert chuckled and reached over to squeeze her knee. "Oh. It’s better than I thought." She forced her eyes away for long enough to see his wide smile. "Look at that."

And now, there were gasps and whispers that grew to a buzz around them. There were arms lifted, fingers pointing north. Jin Li Tam looked away again to take in the pale faces of Sethbert’s generals and captains and lieutenants, and she knew that if she could see all the way back to the line upon line of soldiers and scouts behind her, she’d see the same fear and awe upon their faces, too. Perhaps, she thought, turning her eyes back onto that awful cloud as it lifted higher and higher into the sky, that fear and awe painted every face that could see it for miles and miles around. Perhaps everyone knew what it meant.

"Behold," Sethbert said in a quiet voice, "the end of the Androfrancine tyranny. Windwir is fallen." He chuckled. "Tell that to your father."

And when his chuckle turned into a laugh, Jin Li Tam heard the madness in him for the first time.

Neb

Neb stood in the wagon and watched Windwir stretch out before him. It had taken them five hours to climb the low hills that hemmed the great city in, and now that he could see it he wanted to take it all in, to somehow imprint it on his brain. He was leaving that city for the first time and it would be months before he saw it again.

His father, Brother Hebda, stood as well, stretching in the morning sun. "And you have the bishop’s letters of introduction and credit?" Brother Hebda asked.

Neb wasn’t paying attention. Instead, the massive city filled his view—the cathedrals, the towers, the shops and houses pressed in close against the walls. The colors of kin-clave flew over her, mingled with the royal blue colors of the Androfrancine Order, and even from this vantage, he could see the robed figures bustling about.

His father spoke again and Neb started. "Brother Hebda?"

"I asked after the letters of introduction and credit. You were reading them this morning before we left and I told you to make sure you put them back in their pouch."

Neb tried to remember. He remembered seeing them on his father’s desk and asking if he could look at them. He remembered reading them, being fascinated with the font and script of them. But he couldn’t remember putting them back. "I think I did," he said.

They climbed into the back of the wagon and went through each pouch, pack and sack. When they didn’t find them, his

father sighed.

"I’ll have to go back for them," he said.

Neb looked away. "I’ll come with you, Brother Hebda."

His father shook his head. "No. Wait here for me."

Neb felt his face burn hot, felt a lump in his throat. The

bulky scholar reached out and squeezed Neb’s shoulder.

"Don’t fret over it. I should’ve checked it myself." He

squinted, looking for the right words. "I’m just . . . not used to

having anyone else about."

Neb nodded. "Can I do anything while you’re gone?" Brother Hebda had smiled. "Read. Meditate. Watch the cart. I’ll be back soon."

Neb drew Whymer Mazes in the dirt and tried to concentrate on his meditation. But everything called him away. First the sounds of the birds, the wind, the champing of the horse. And the smell of evergreen and dust and horse-sweat. And his sweat, too, now dried after five long hours in the shade.

He’d waited for years. Every year he’d petitioned the headmaster for a grant, and now, just one year shy of manhood and the ability to captain his own destiny without the approval of the Franci Orphanage, he’d finally been released to study with his father. The Androfrancines could not prove their vow of chastity if they had children on their arms, so the Franci Orphanage looked after them all. None knew their birth-mothers and only a few knew their fathers.

Neb’s father had actually come to see him at least twice a year and had sent him gifts and books from far off places while he dug in Churning Wastes, studying times before the Age of Laughing Madness. And one time, years ago, he’d even told Neb that someday he’d bring the boy along so that he could see what the love of P’Andro Whym was truly about, a love so strong that it would cause a man to sacrifice his only begotten son.

Finally, Neb received his grant.

And here at the beginning of his trip to the Wastes, he’d already disappointed the man he most wanted to make proud.

Five hours had passed, and even though there was no way to pick him out from such a distance, Neb stood every so often and looked down toward the city, watching the gate near the river docks.

He’d just sat down from checking yet again when the hair on his arms stood up and the world went completely silent but for a solitary, tinny voice far away. He leaped to his feet. Then, a heavy buzzing grew in his ears and his skin tingled from a sudden wind that seemed to bend the sky. The buzzing grew to a shriek and his eyes went wide as they filled with both light and darkness, and he stood transfixed, arms stretched wide, standing at his full height, mouth hanging open.

The ground shook and he watched the city wobble as the shrieking grew. Birds scattered out from the city, specks of brown and white and black that he could barely see in the ash and debris that the sudden, hot wind stirred.

Spires tumbled and rooftops collapsed. The walls trembled and gave up, breaking apart as they fell inward. Fires sprang up—a rainbow kaleidoscope of colors—licking at first and then devouring. Neb watched the tiny robed forms of bustling life burst into flame. He watched lumbering dark shadows move through the roiling ash, laying waste to anything that dared to stand. He watched flaming sailors leap from burning bows as the ships cast off and begged the current save them. But ships and sailors alike kept burning, green and white, as they sank beneath the waters. There was the sound of cracking stone and boiling water, the smell of heated rock and charred meat. And the pain of the Desolation of Windwir racked his own body. Neb shrieked when he felt this heart burst or that body bloat and explode.

Excerpted from Lamentation by Ken Scholes.
Copyright 2009 by Kenneth G. Scholes.
Published in February 2009 by Tom Doherty Associates.
All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 74 )
Rating Distribution

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(42)

4 Star

(19)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 74 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 24, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    The first Psalms of Isaak is an excellent epic fantasy

    Way into the distrant future in the Named Lands, the city of Windwir is recognized by most as the center of world. Much of that proclamation comes from the city being home to the Androfrancines, who are the keepers of the Old World knowledge in their Great Library; a place where science and magic mingle. This is a normal day until a metal bird flies above the city. Soon afterward darkness engulfs Windwir. When the dust settles and the sun shines through, the city is gone; left behind is a scorched plain.<BR/><BR/>Nothing will be the same inside the Named Lands from that moment when the Old World metallic weapon quoting Xhum Y'zir's Seven Cacophonic Deaths destroyed the city. Stunned warrior Lord Rudolfo of the Ninefold Forest Houses saw from a distance the smoke that is all that is left of Windwir. He heads there immediately and finds a shocked survivor apprentice Isaak sitting where the city was moments earlier sputtering references from the Seven Cacophonic Deaths; he had been just outside when the devastation occurred. The kingdoms blame each other and maneuver to take advantage of the dramatic change in relationships. Increasingly evidence points to the Entrolusian City States Overseer Sethbert as the culprit. He apparently has brought back the ancient weapons of mass destruction as war threatens to send the Named Lands back to the Stone Age.<BR/><BR/>The first Psalms of Isaak is an excellent epic fantasy that in many ways is a post apocalyptic science fiction thriller. The story line is fast-paced from the incredibly opening sequence and filled with intriguing twists that never quite allows the reader to gently peruse the plot. The world seems plausible and solid enough while the key players Isaak and Rodolfo are well developed so readers get to know them.. Fans will relish Ken Sholes¿ strong opening act as war engulfs the Named Lands while mindful of nineteenth century novelist Alphonse Karr¿s commentary ¿The more things change, the more they are the same¿.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great start to the series.

    I didn't really get into this novel until about 4 or 5 chapters in, but it takes off from there. Very well written(great descriptions),Schole really paints a picture when describing things. Scholes style reminds me a lot of Raymond Feist. I can't wait to get my hands on the next one.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2013

    A refreshing and revitalizing read!

    Initially, I picked up the author's second book first in a dollar store book rack. That was Canticle. After reading just couple of pages, I knew Id found a readers Holy Grail book, the one that stands above the books that pale in comparison and are used as filler until a great book comes along, hail Lamentation! I am a prolific reader and newbie to the electronic readers like Nook, etc. Even though I was gifted one I had not purchased any reading material UNTIL I read those few pages of Lamentation and knew I wanted to get the first book and start properly. I did, and was rewarded with an excellent novel that introduced everything I loved; swords and magic and characters with depth. Combined with superior writing ability by the author Ken Scholes, an object made of paper and ink, was transformed into a portal to the Named Lands and all within.

    I got hooked on Fantasy with the Thomas Convenant/Illearth book, and Canticle is its equal. Kudos Ken!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 15, 2013

    highly recommend

    The story seemed confusing for the first few chapters but once the characters were better associated to the story, the reader became engrossed into each proceeding chapter. So much so that I didn't bother to read the prologue to the next book, Canticle, I just started right into the book.

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  • Posted August 14, 2013

    This was a very enjoyable read with a story-line that held my in

    This was a very enjoyable read with a story-line that held my interest.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2013

    !!!

    !

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2012

    Couldn't put it down

    So many new twists, can't wait to read the next

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  • Posted July 19, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A brilliant voice in the genre

    Windmir is gone, the once Golden City the center of culture, education and religion is nothing but smoke, ash and bones. What or who caused this terrible desolation, and most important why. The devastation will bring out the best and the worst in people, some will rise to and above their potential and some will slither away, some will shine and some will show their true tarnish, some will live and some will die, but all will never forget. There are schemes at work here and it's up to a chosen few to not only protect what is left but to prepare for the future, a future with more questions than answers, more doubt than hope, more fear than resolve. But these are the peoples of The Named Lands and they're made of strong stuff and they'll need to be to make it from their Lamentation to a Canticle.
    Ken Scholes is a luminous voice in a genre of plenty, a relatively new voice and yet one so versed in his own new world that it seems they've been around for ever. This is not my first reading of Lamentation, I was lucky enough to get at ARC of the third in the series Antiphon and to give it what it deserves I read the first two first. I was literally blown away by the creation of this semi-familiar and yet very foreign world and it's people. It was familiar in the language and objects and so I didn't have to learn a whole other vernacular, but the landscape was total make believe and he instilled the views in my mind with his narrative. Then there were his characters, most human with one very special metal man, the man of the hour Isaak who's humanistic compassion set him far above his compatriots and other humans in the tale. His human characters are as diverse as the world they live in but they are all eloquently detailed and we readers will get all the in-depth information on them we need to make the read more enjoyable.
    Lamentation is a love story, it's a mystery, it's a thriller and it's filled with vivid imagery that highlights the author's creative genius. If you're a fan of Science Fiction you will love this, but that's not a pre-requisite to enjoy this novel and the novels that follow.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2011

    An original literary fantasy novel

    It is very well written, in a world unlike any fantasy novel I've read before. Very highly recommended for anyone that likes their fantasy with some meat on it's bones.

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  • Posted August 23, 2010

    Couldn't put it down

    Similar to Song of Fire and Ice, this epic, multi-character story takes place in a unique and fully realized world.

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  • Posted August 15, 2010

    Excellent political fantasy

    This novel isn't your typical swords and sorcery fantasy. While it has magic and such, it also includes a "scientific" bent that I would classify as influenced by some steampunk. Qualifying that statement I don't want to leave an impression its not magical fantasy because it definitely is.

    The plot of the novel is presented through the eyes and actions of 7-10 characters. It is very character driven. One thing I really enjoyed is you get the impression from each of the characters that they are all doing the "right" thing. The novel has some violence of course but the fighting is a minor part of the story, and only shown where necessary for the story.

    I really enjoyed this story. One of the first truly political fantasies I've liked.

    Recommended.

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  • Posted May 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Too Slow For Me

    If you just want a good and differnt type of story than this should work for you. However, for me, it is lacking in any real action or suspense.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2010

    A great read, leaving you yearning for the next installment.

    An interesting blend of sci-fi and fantasy elements. It reminded me of Star Wars, oddly enough, with androids and deserts and magical powers.

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  • Posted March 27, 2010

    I want to know more!

    I am a huge fan of fantasy, and found this story to meet all of my expectations. Imagine a world where science and religion battled it out for supremacy and neither one, leaving only ruin and a few scattered people. After a thousand years the people left from the cataclysm are just beginning to rediscover old technologies and this may actually become their downfall. This is a compelling tale of treachery, love and the desire for knowledge.

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  • Posted November 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    An amazing maze of mystery.

    This story to me is like the Whymer Mazes used as a meditation device by the Androfrancines. The maze circle that seems to never end and always turns back on to itself. I loved this story, there's always a mystery to figure out. Who and why did they destroy the city of Windwir, the home to the Androfrancines who protected the rest of the people in the world from the technology and dark pieces that could be used to destroy the world and only trickling out the small pieces of information they felt the people of the world can handle.

    There is talk of an ancient Wizard whom created the Seven Cacophonic Deaths, which no one is to know what the words are inorder to protect everyone and anyone from causing distruction.

    However, the book starts right off with the distruction of Windwir and only one metal man from the city, being fully functional, seems to have somewhere in his memory some idea yet no idea as to what happened on that tragic day. Isaak is the name given to this metal man.

    There are many creative secrets in this book, such as the letters with secret messages intertwined within, the tapping out of messages while talking to another person on their skin, and the wonderous magic of running so fast and not being seen either running or standing still. Then you have Isaak the metal man, who is powered by a constant steam source.

    I loved the writing style of a view from each characters point of view. When I first say this was the writing style I was nervous that information would be lost in the translation. After I read through this book so far, I did start taking notes so I didn't forget all the wonderous details to help with the mystery, but found that I really liked the way the author wrote this with the point of views. I actually got more details from seeing and knowing what each character did.

    Did the right man pay the price for the distruction of the city? Could he have weaved the web that you see in this book? The further you go in the book the more intricate the web becomes. The more I thought on the book after reading and trying to piece together information from through out the whole book I have a very my idea of what is going on. I am curious to read what really happens. I had a wonderful time piecing the pieces together and making the story go the way I think it may.

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  • Posted August 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Wow...what a great read...

    I finished Lamentation a few months ago and honestly, I am sad I finished it. I admit, I couldn't put it down. I was drawn in from the beginning and was kept enthralled by the movement and escapism that Scholes provides with his unique Sci Fi/Fantasy world.

    Ken has created a world with so much potential for future stories, not only from Lamentation's time setting, but probably even more from the world's past history. Many great stories deal with choosing between making the sacrifice for the greater good, and Scholes' I believe really made his character's live up to this.

    I am very excited and am impatiently waiting for the next in the series, "Canticle".

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  • Posted May 3, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Efficient in the best way

    Scholes' fast-paced style manages to keep the plot clipping along while somehow (and this is the amazing part) managing to introduce a deep world that begs to be discovered. I highly recommend this book and plead with the author to stay the course. I am ready for the next installment.

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  • Posted March 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Great start and excited for more

    I had been searching for a new SciFi/Fantasy author to enjoy and I believe I have find him. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It reads quickly and at times, you just can't put it down. Although the world the author creates is perhaps not quite as rich as some of the best of the genre, it is right up there and you jump in right away.

    In my opinion, the plot has just the right amount of complication, intrigue, and suspense. Not simplistic, but not so convoluted as to cause head-scratching or doubt. And it sets up more to come, which is great.

    This is perfect for a rainy day or any time you just want to get away. I recommend it highly.

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  • Posted March 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Loved it

    Fast paced from start to finish. Great characters and plot line that grab you and won't let you go. Best fantasy of the year so far.

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  • Posted February 25, 2009

    Awesome

    I like books that start off running and don't stop, This book has interesting twists, good characters and leaves you wanting MORE!!! can't wait for the next one.

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