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The Land of Feast and Famine
     

The Land of Feast and Famine

by Helge Ingstad
 

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The young Norwegian was Helge Ingstad, now famous for his discovery in 1960 of a Viking village at L'Anse aux Meadows (on the northern tip of Newfoundland) -- the oldest known European settlement in North America. Ingstad recorded his adventures in the Canadian North in The Land of Feast and Famine, originally published in Norwegian in 1931 and first released in

Overview


The young Norwegian was Helge Ingstad, now famous for his discovery in 1960 of a Viking village at L'Anse aux Meadows (on the northern tip of Newfoundland) -- the oldest known European settlement in North America. Ingstad recorded his adventures in the Canadian North in The Land of Feast and Famine, originally published in Norwegian in 1931 and first released in English two years later. Now, after being out of print in English for more than forty years, The Land of Feast and Famine is once again available, with its description of youthful adventure and its vivid portrayal of the people and ways of the Northwest Territories in the last days of the fur trading era. After making his way into the Canadian Arctic interior, Ingstad spent one winter with a fellow trapper in a log cabin they built themselves, and another living and hunting with a tribe of Inuit known as the Caribou-Eaters. During his final winter in the North, Ingstad lived in a tent in an area called the Barren Lands, hunting caribou and wolves, alone with his five dogs. In 1937, a small river in the Barren Lands was renamed Ingstad Creek. The life Ingstad describes is harsh and full of danger. He recounts many close calls of his own as well as the fates of those far less fortunate. On his way out of the North, Ingstad learned that the colourful adventurer John Hornby and two of his companions starved to death while on a expedition to the Barren Lands -- one of them outliving the others by months. But Ingstad's life in the Canadian Arctic was also full of heart-warming experiences. He describes the native companions and fellow trappers with whom he shared adventures and relates stories of numerous hunts and how he learned first hand about beaver, caribou, wolf, and other wildlife. He also provides a remarkable body of knowledge about native medicine. The arrival of the age of aviation opened up the North and, as Ingstad prophetically observed in 1931, the way of life of the native people, who were "still pursuing the free nomadic existence of their forefathers," would be irrevocably changed. At a time when the ways of life of Canada's native and Inuit people are more threatened than ever before, The Land of Feast and Famine provides a fascinating glimpse at a time already far in the past.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Before renowned Norwegian explorer Ingstad discovered the site of Leif Erickson's North American landfall, he spent the years from 1926 to 1930 living the adventurer's life, trapping fur in the Canadian tundra. This wondrous book, long out of print, transports readers to that time and place. The rhythms that govern life in the North resonate in the reader: the challenge to survive day after day blizzards and weather that never rises above -40, the aches resulting from breaking trails in the tundra, the rejoicing when a migrating herd of caribou--the area's main food source--is finally spotted by a ravenous hunting party and the marvels of nature's variety, from a wolf-howl symphony to the landscape's majesty. If there is any flaw here it is the stereotypes about Indians and Eskimos prevalent at the time. Yet Ingstad's narrative mitigates even these unfortunate characterizations, making them seem naive rather than evil, and adds to the sense that we have lost a pk northland utopia that tested every man fairly and equally and where the only real question was whether the caribou would come. (Apr.)
From the Publisher

"Ingstad is a good witness ... His writing is lively and he shoes great skill in keeping his reader with him ... This book is an adventure/travel story that is also a first-hand account of the last days of the fur trappers' society and as such is a valuable document ... a first Canadian edition is appropriate and timely." Dorothy Harley Eber, author of When The Whalers Were Up North.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780773509122
Publisher:
McGill-Queens University Press
Publication date:
04/24/1992
Pages:
360
Product dimensions:
(w) x (h) x 1.00(d)

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