Land of Hope (Ellis Island Series #1)

( 5 )

Overview

Russian immigrant Rebekah Levinsky hopes desperately that her dream will come true in America. On the difficult ocean journey to the "land of opportunity" she meets two other girls—Kristin Swensen from Sweden and Rose Carney from Ireland. The three quickly become friends as they share their visions of the future and endure life on the overcrowded ship.

Once they reach Ellis Island the girls must separate and Rebekah and her family settle in New York on the Lower East Side. ...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback)
$5.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (53) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $3.04   
  • Used (47) from $1.99   
Land of Hope

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.99
BN.com price
Note: Visit our Teens Store.

Overview

Russian immigrant Rebekah Levinsky hopes desperately that her dream will come true in America. On the difficult ocean journey to the "land of opportunity" she meets two other girls—Kristin Swensen from Sweden and Rose Carney from Ireland. The three quickly become friends as they share their visions of the future and endure life on the overcrowded ship.

Once they reach Ellis Island the girls must separate and Rebekah and her family settle in New York on the Lower East Side. Instead of finding streets paved with gold, they slave seven days a week in a sweatshop. Will Rebekah find the courage to conquer the odds and find happiness in the United States of America.

Rebekah, a fifteen-year-old Jewish immigrant arriving in New York City in 1902, almost abandons her dream of getting an education when she is forced to work in a sweatshop.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This first book of a series spotlights Rebekah Levinsky, who, with her family, escapes the pogroms of Russia and boards a crowded steamship for New York City in 1902. The journey's rigors and the agony of leaving her homeland recede somewhat when she meets three emigrants of her own age, yet the girl's joy on arriving at Ellis Island is diminished when her grandfather's limp prevents his entering the country. More problems follow: cramped living quarters, sweatshop working conditions, a street gang that harasses Rebekah's older brother. Nixon ably dramatizes the hope that can emerge in response to oppression--political and otherwise; despite Rebekah's pleas to attend school and become a teacher, her parents insist she focus on an arranged marriage and childbearing. The book has its shortcomings, however--stilted dialogue, a repetitious, sometimes dull narrative and numerous Yiddish words likely to perplex youngsters. Still, this close-up view of turn-of-the-century America and Nixon's factual afterword on Ellis Island are admirable compensations. Ages 10-up. (Nov.)
Children's Literature
Three teenage girls stand together with the Statue of Liberty towering in the background. They are very different. Rebekah Levinsky, dark-haired and earnest, is part of a Jewish family hoping to escape Russia's increasing oppression of her people. Swedish Kristen Swensen, with her blue eyes and blond braids, is traveling with her family to Minnesota. Irish Rose Carney, with her curly red hair and green eyes, will join her father in Chicago, then help him earn enough money to send for the rest of the family. The three girls, all so different, find friendship through their common destination—Ellis Island. Nixon's tale follows the main character, Rebekah, from the night she huddles with her family on Russia's borders, through the rigors of ocean travel in steerage and the suspense of Ellis Island, on to the tenements of New York. Although Rebekah experiences loss and disappointment along the way, she is eager to embrace the new world's opportunity—free education, open to girls like her. But will the family's values or their poverty allow her to realize her dreams? Letters from Kristen and Rose, plus the steadfast friendship/budding romance with tall, musical Aaron Mirsch help to bolster Rebekah's resolve. Well-researched and interesting, this book, part of the "Ellis Island" series, could be the catalyst for creative classroom projects, such as mapping Rebekah's journey, writing journal entries for a character in the book, or donning period dress in order to give oral reports about Ellis Island or New York's ethnic neighborhoods of the period. 2001 (orig. 1992), Gareth Stevens, . Ages 8 to 14. Reviewer: Judy Crowder
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-- Rebekah, 15, and her family leave their shtetl in Russia for the U. S., seeking safety from the random violence against Jews. On the ship she meets two girls, one Irish and one Swedish, representing two other major groups of immigrants in the early 1900s. Rebekah and her friends talk about the opportunities for women in their new country, a theme that reappears throughout the story. Interwoven is the beginning of a romance that will surely develop in later books. The novel's strength is its sense of place; readers suffer the smells and trials of the long, harrowing ocean trip and feel the confusion the family faces in New York, even then a large and chaotic city. The characters, who seem to be typecast for their role in a book about the ``immigrant experience,'' and the episodic plot slow down the pace of the story, and it's difficult for readers to care much about these people. Other novels set in the same period include the powerful Call Me Ruth (Doubleday, 1982; o.p.) by Marilyn Sachs and One Way to Ansonia (Bradbury, 1985) by Judie Angell. --Amy Kellman, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
Candace Smith
In the first book of the Ellis Island series, 15-year-old Rebekah Levinsky escapes persecution in Russia and flees with her family to join Uncle Avir in New York City. Few of the family's belongings can be brought on the treacherous voyage, and Rebekah misses her best friend and the home she leaves behind. Even so, she adapts quickly to life on board the ship and finds friends. Her arduous journey is vividly described; her friendships and fleeting shipboard romance are less convincing. When Rebekah's grandfather is denied entry into the U.S. because he is lame, the family is devastated. They are also unprepared for the cramped living quarters of their new home and the long hours they must work in the sweat shop to survive in the new land. Despite the difficulties, Rebekah is still granted her one wish--to go to school. Nixon's careful rendering of life for immigrants in the early 1900s is realistically harsh yet hopeful, and teenagers will absorb a strong sense of the times as they read Rebekah's engrossing story.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780440215974
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 8/28/1993
  • Series: Ellis Island Series , #1
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 602,427
  • Age range: 12 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 880L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.49 (w) x 7.01 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A really good historical fiction book

    if you like historical fiction i think you will like this book. it was really good and it was a pretty easy book to read. just read it and you wont be dissapointed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2007

    The book was great!

    This book was very bad, I don't ever want to read it again. In fact, I recommended it to all of my friends! I think This book was very good, I think many teachers should read it to their class. It stunk that much. If you want to read this awesome book, don't, because it stinks. And don't forget, this book rocks!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2004

    Land of Hope (Ellis Island Series #1)

    this is just a great book, i am reading this book for my school project and this talks about how teenage girl feels and how she wants to get educated in united states. in russia she couldnt do anything she wanted just because she was a girl. but life is not so easy in united states either. this book is full of surprises, sad and lots of information of history. everyone should read this book! this is awesome!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2004

    Land of Hope (Ellis Island Series #1)

    this book is just awesome it talks about how pre-teen feels about growing up and deals with money problem and finding their life in united state.everyone should read this book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2001

    A great, and interesting book.

    The way this story describes the way of Jewish life is awesome. It is a very hopeful book for anyone who immigrates to the U.S.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2000

    A great book!

    Has good facts, about a jewish immigrant from Russia coming to the 'Land of Hope' where she dreams to go to school and become a teacher.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)