Landmarks of African American History

Landmarks of African American History

by James Oliver Horton
     
 

In Landmarks of African American History, James Oliver Horton chooses thirteen historic sites to explore the struggles and triumphs of African Americans and how they helped shape the rich and varied history of the United States. Horton begins with the first Africans brought to Jamestown, Virginia, and the start of slavery in the colonies that became the United

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Overview

In Landmarks of African American History, James Oliver Horton chooses thirteen historic sites to explore the struggles and triumphs of African Americans and how they helped shape the rich and varied history of the United States. Horton begins with the first Africans brought to Jamestown, Virginia, and the start of slavery in the colonies that became the United States. Boston's Old State House provides the backdrop to the martyrdom of Crispus Attucks, the former slave killed in the Boston Massacre, the confrontation with British troops that led to the American Revolution. After the Civil War, former slaves settled the desolate area of Nicodemus, Kansas, and turned it into a thriving community. The USS Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and Boston's Old State House illustrate African American contributions to the defense of their country and reveal racial tensions within the military. And the black students who demanded service at Woolworth's racially segregated lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, launched the sit-in movement and advanced the fight for civil rights. Horton brings together a wide variety of African American historical sites to tell of the glory and hardship, of the great achievement and determination, of the people and events that have shaped the values, ideals, and dreams of our nation.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The latest installment in Oxford's "American Landmarks" series (which includes Landmarks of the American Revolution, Landmarks of American Women's History, and Landmarks of the Civil War), this work features more than a dozen places recognized by the National Register of Historic Places as African American "historic sites." Horton (Free People of Color: Inside the African American Community), who serves as the general editor of the series, has arranged the volume chronologically by historic event, starting with the Jamestown Colonial National Historical Park, where the first slaves were brought to America in 1619, and concluding with the F.W. Woolworth Building in Greensboro, NC, where the modern Civil Rights Movement began during a 1960 sit-in to protest a segregated lunch counter. In each chapter, he briefly outlines the historic importance of the place and provides its street address, phone number, and web site. Many chapters also display primary-source documents, including diaries, letters, and newspapers. A handy map depicts the location of sites spanning several states, ranging from Boston (African Meeting House) to Topeka, KS (the site of the landmark Supreme Court decision on school desegregation) and also Honolulu (the site of Pearl Harbor, where many African American military personnel served). Bottom Line Beautifully illustrated with color photographs, maps, and black-and-white illustrations, this outstanding volume serves as a superb guide to these sites, combining highly informative narrative with elegant layout. History-minded travelers well aware that not everything may be found on the web would be happy to carry it from place to place; students and researchers will appreciate the vast amount of information packed into a rather compact book. Highly recommended.-Donald Altschiller, Boston Univ. Libs. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-African-American history has been approached in a number of ways, through cultural and social histories with atlases, biographies, and almanacs. Horton discusses 13 historic places, beginning with Jamestown, VA, and ending with the Woolworth department store in Greensboro, NC, the site of the first student sit-in in 1960. Clearly written and well organized, the text enriches the study of African-American history, providing a context and a look at its artifacts. Students can actually see the houses, courtrooms, or churches that mean so much to the historical narrative. Horton provides each place he includes with a historical overview and documents its significance. Well-placed illustrations of archival and current photographs and maps make for an attractive presentation. Students are apt to come away from this text with some interesting facts that they are not likely to forget. Landmarks may not be a first purchase, but it is a worthy addition.-Carol Jones Collins, Columbia High School, Maplewood, NJ Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195141184
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
03/28/2005
Series:
American Landmarks Series
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
10.10(w) x 7.30(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

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