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Landscape Gardening in Japan
     

Landscape Gardening in Japan

by Josiah Conder
 

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Written by the noted Victorian architect and first published in 1893, this classic work was instrumental in introducing Japanese landscape gardening to the West. It presents the rules, history, and theories of Japanese landscape gardening from ancient times, lavishly illustrated with line drawings. Under Condor´s direction, it is possible to make gardens in the

Overview

Written by the noted Victorian architect and first published in 1893, this classic work was instrumental in introducing Japanese landscape gardening to the West. It presents the rules, history, and theories of Japanese landscape gardening from ancient times, lavishly illustrated with line drawings. Under Condor´s direction, it is possible to make gardens in the Japanese manner, shown here in all its rich variety, very different to the minimalist Zen gardens that Westerners think of as the Japanese form. Ornamental pagodas, rustic wells, lanterns, water features, decorative bridges, arbors, and screens form the backdrop to carefully chosen plants, meticulously described as to variety, attributes, and placement. Conder tells how to combine these elements to construct specialist creations such as the tea garden, hill garden, flat garden, passage garden, water gardens, and fancy gardens. Condor´s aim was two-fold: to present a complete account of the art of the Japanese garden of his time, and to show that beneath these Eastern compositions lie fundamental aesthetic principles applicable to the gardens of any country. He succeeds in both brilliantly.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486265599
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
10/28/1990
Pages:
251

Meet the Author

JOSIAH CONDER (1852-1920), a graduate of the Royal Institute of Architects, came to Japan at the age of twenty-four to play a role in the modernization of the emerging Japanese state. He served concurrently as a professor of architecture and a consultant to the Japanese government. Between 1878 and 1907 he designed over 50 major buildings in the Tokyo area, which served as models to the rapidly industrializing nation. His name is mentioned in all books dealing with early modern architecture in Japan. The many pupils he taught over the years were to form the first generation of Japanese architects building in the Western style. He remained in Japan until his death and is buried at Gokokuji Temple, Tokyo.

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