Landscape of Lies

( 2 )

Overview

Isobel Sadler is dead broke. The only thing she's got that might bring in any money is a stupendously bad painting that's been in her family for generations. It's so ugly she can't imagine it would be worth much, but the other night someone tried to steal it. Mystified, she turns to art dealer Michael Whiting, who identifies the painting as a 16th-century treasure map. If they can decipher the clues, Isobel's money troubles will be history. Whiting, however, isn't the only one who has figured out the painting's ...

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Overview

Isobel Sadler is dead broke. The only thing she's got that might bring in any money is a stupendously bad painting that's been in her family for generations. It's so ugly she can't imagine it would be worth much, but the other night someone tried to steal it. Mystified, she turns to art dealer Michael Whiting, who identifies the painting as a 16th-century treasure map. If they can decipher the clues, Isobel's money troubles will be history. Whiting, however, isn't the only one who has figured out the painting's true identity: a rival is one step ahead, and he'll stop at nothing to get his hands on the medieval treasure.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
When someone tries to steal a medieval painting long owned by her family, Isobel Sadler turns for help to London art gallery owner Michael Whiting. She is amazed to learn that the picture, titled Landscape of Lies , is a ``puzzle map'' whose nine male figures each symbolize priceless silver relics that were squirreled away by monks when Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries. Isobel and Michael--who, naturally, fall in love--set out to find the treasure, but an obsessed academic who will stop at nothing, not even murder, stays a few steps ahead of them. Watson, who proved himself a master of the art-world thriller in The Caravaggio Conspiracy , has turned out an amiable entertainment that is more a self-indulgent exercise than a suspense novel. The path to the silver is strewn with red herrings and arcane clues involving Botticelli, the Bible, horticulture, classical lore and medieval iconography. (Jan.)
Library Journal
After foiling a determined burglar's attempt to steal an apparently valueless 16th-century painting, Isobel Sadler enlists the aid of art dealer Michael Whiting. Soon convinced the picture reveals the location of long-lost sacred treasures worth millions, the two compete with the mysterious, increasingly ruthless burglar to solve the painted puzzle first. As Michael and Isobel cross London and the countryside, art history, budding romance, and deepening suspense merge in a credible journey related with sustained literariness, refinement, and polish. A wonderful, charming offering from the author of The Caravaggio Conspiracy .
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781933397184
  • Publisher: Felony & Mayhem, LLC
  • Publication date: 12/28/2005
  • Series: Felony and Mayhem Mysteries Series
  • Pages: 378
  • Sales rank: 989,635
  • Product dimensions: 5.56 (w) x 7.43 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2005

    UTTERLY BORING

    Nothing seems to happen in this boring, self-indulgent mystery in which two rigid, estereotypical characters try halfheartedly to decipher the clues contained in a bad picture from the sixteenth century and fall in love in the process. The characters are coarsely drawn, the pace is clumsy and the prose is pitiful. This guy should stick to non-fiction.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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