Landscapes of Movement: Trails, Paths, and Roads in Anthropological Perspective

Overview

Landscapes of Movement originates from the premise that trails, paths, and roads are the physical manifestation of human movement through the landscape and are central to an understanding of that movement. The study of these features connects with many intellectual domains, engaging history, geography, environmental studies, and, in particular, anthropology and archaeology. These diverse fields together provide not only a better understanding of infrastructure but also of social, political, and economic ...

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Overview

Landscapes of Movement originates from the premise that trails, paths, and roads are the physical manifestation of human movement through the landscape and are central to an understanding of that movement. The study of these features connects with many intellectual domains, engaging history, geography, environmental studies, and, in particular, anthropology and archaeology. These diverse fields together provide not only a better understanding of infrastructure but also of social, political, and economic organization, cultural expressions of patterned movement, and the ways in which trails, paths, and roads reflect a culture's traditional knowledge, worldview, memory, and identity.

The contributors to Landscapes of Movement document these routes across different times and cultures, from those made by hunter-gatherers in the Great Basin of North America to causeways in the Bolivian Amazon to Bronze Age towns in the Near East, examined through aerial and satellite photography, surface survey, historic records, and archaeological excavation. The essays consider many factors in the development and use of trails, paths, and roads, including labor, technology, terrain characteristics, landscape features, access, and ownership. Diverse scales of movement are also addressed, ranging from paths between home and fields to roads used for long-distance journeying. Overall, the book makes the case for the centrality of paths, trails, and roads as an organizing element of human lives throughout history.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

James E. Snead is Associate Professor of Anthropology at George Mason University. Clark L. Erickson is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania and Associate Curator of the American Section at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. J. Andrew Darling is Coordinator of the Cultural Resource Management Program at the Gila River Indian Community.

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Table of Contents

Figures
Tables
Foreword
Preface

1 Making Human Space: The Archaeology of Trails, Paths, and Roads
—James E. Snead, Clark L. Erickson, and J. Andrew Darling
2 Kukhepya: Searching for Hopi Trails
—T. J. Ferguson, G. Lennis Berlin, and Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma
3 Trails of Tradition: Movement, Meaning, and Place
—James E. Snead
4 O'odham Trails and the Archaeology of Space
—J. Andrew Darling
5 Reconstructing Southern Paiute-Chemehuevi Trails in the Mojave Desert of Southern Nevada and California: Ethnographic Perspectives from the 1930s
—Catherine S. Fowler
6 From Path to Myth: Journeys and the Naturalization of Territorial Identity along the Missouri River
—María Nieves Zedeño, Kacy Hollenback, and Calvin Grinnell
7 A Road by Any Other Name: Trails, Paths, and Roads in Maya Language and Thought
—Angela H. Keller
8 When the Construction of Meaning Preceded the Meaning of Construction: From Footpaths to Monumental Entrances in Ancient Costa Rica
—Payson Sheets
9 Emergent Landscapes of Movement in Early Bronze Age Northern Mesopotamia
—Jason Ur
10 Agency, Causeways, Canals, and the Landscapes of Everyday Life in the Bolivian Amazon
—Clark L. Erickson
11 Precolumbian Causeways and Canals as Landesque Capital
—Clark L. Erickson and John H. Walker
12 Routes through the Landscape: A Comparative Approach
—Timothy Earle

Appendix 1. Coding of the Cases of Paths, Trails, and Roads Discussed in the Conference
—Timothy Earle
Appendix 2. Comparative Variables for Trails, Paths, and Roads
References
Contributors

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