Language Implementation Patterns: Create Your Own Domain-Specific and General Programming Languages

Overview

Learn to build configuration file readers, data readers, model-driven code generators, source-to-source translators, source analyzers, and interpreters. You don't need a background in computer science—ANTLR creator Terence Parr demystifies language implementation by breaking it down into the most common design patterns. Pattern by pattern, you'll learn the key skills you need to implement your own computer languages.

Knowing how to create domain-specific languages (DSLs) can ...

See more details below
Paperback
$24.67
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$34.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $19.95   
  • New (7) from $20.12   
  • Used (6) from $19.95   
Sending request ...

Overview

Learn to build configuration file readers, data readers, model-driven code generators, source-to-source translators, source analyzers, and interpreters. You don't need a background in computer science—ANTLR creator Terence Parr demystifies language implementation by breaking it down into the most common design patterns. Pattern by pattern, you'll learn the key skills you need to implement your own computer languages.

Knowing how to create domain-specific languages (DSLs) can give you a huge productivity boost. Instead of writing code in a general-purpose programming language, you can first build a custom language tailored to make you efficient in a particular domain.

The key is understanding the common patterns found across language implementations. Language Design Patterns identifies and condenses the most common design patterns, providing sample implementations of each.

The pattern implementations use Java, but the patterns themselves are completely general. Some of the implementations use the well-known ANTLR parser generator, so readers will find this book an excellent source of ANTLR examples as well. But this book will benefit anyone interested in implementing languages, regardless of their tool of choice. Other language implementation books focus on compilers, which you rarely need in your daily life. Instead, Language Design Patterns shows you patterns you can use for all kinds of language applications.

You'll learn to create configuration file readers, data readers, model-driven code generators, source-to-source translators, source analyzers, and interpreters. Each chapter groups related design patterns and, in each pattern, you'll get hands-on experience by building a complete sample implementation. By the time you finish the book, you'll know how to solve most common language implementation problems.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Throw away your compiler theory book! Terence Parr shows how to write practical parsers, translators, interpreters, and other language applications using modern tools and design patterns. Whether you’re designing your own DSL or mining existing code for bugs or gems, you’ll find example code and suggested patterns in this clearly written book about all aspects of parsing technology."

—Guido van Rossum, Creator of the Python language

"This text is excellent. The exposition plus the examples makes otherwise complex ideas very clear and accessible. Well done!"

—Tom Nurkkala, Associate Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, Taylor University

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781934356456
  • Publisher: Pragmatic Bookshelf
  • Publication date: 1/14/2010
  • Pages: 350
  • Sales rank: 948,548
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Terence Parr is a professor of computer science and graduate program director at the University of San Francisco, where he continues to work on his ANTLR parser generator (http://www.antlr.org) and template engine (http://www.stringtemplate.org). Terence has consulted for and held various technical positions at companies such as IBM, Lockheed Missiles and Space, NeXT, and Renault Automation. Terence holds a Ph.D. in computer engineering from Purdue University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Army High-Performance Computing Research Center at the University of Minnesota, where he built parallelizing FORTRAN source-to-source translators. He is the author of "The Definitive ANTLR Reference":http://pragprog.com/titles/tpantlr.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

I Getting Started with Parsing 1

1 Language Applications Cracked Open 3

2 Basic Parsing Patterns 21

3 Enhanced Parsing Patterns 49

II Analyzing Languages 71

4 Building Intermediate Form Trees 73

5 Walking and Rewriting Trees 101

6 Tracking and Identifying Program Symbols 131

7 Managing Symbol Tables for Data Aggregates 155

8 Enforcing Static Typing Rules 181

III Building Interpreters 217

9 Building High-Level Interpreters 219

10 Building Bytecode Interpreters 239

IV Translating and Generating Languages 277

11 Translating Computer Languages 279

12 Generating DSLs with Templates 313

13 Putting It All Together 349

Bibliography 359

Index 361

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)