Language, Mind and Nature: Artificial Languages in England from Bacon to Locke

Language, Mind and Nature: Artificial Languages in England from Bacon to Locke

by Rhodri Lewis
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521874750

ISBN-13: 9780521874755

Pub. Date: 05/31/2007

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

In the attempt to make good one of the desiderata in Bacon's Advancement of Learning, a cohort of seventeenth-century philosophers, scientists, schoolmasters, clergymen and virtuosi attempted to devise artificial languages that would immediately represent the order of thought. This was believed directly to represent the order of things and to be a universal

Overview

In the attempt to make good one of the desiderata in Bacon's Advancement of Learning, a cohort of seventeenth-century philosophers, scientists, schoolmasters, clergymen and virtuosi attempted to devise artificial languages that would immediately represent the order of thought. This was believed directly to represent the order of things and to be a universal characteristic of the human mind. Language, Mind and Nature is a 2007 text which fully reconstructs this artificial language movement. In so doing, it reveals a great deal about the beliefs and activities of those who sought to reform learning in seventeenth-century England. Artificial languages straddle occult, religious and proto-scientific approaches to representation and communication, and suggest that much of the so-called 'new philosophy' was not very new at all. This study broke important ground within its field, and will interest anyone concerned with early modern intellectual history or with the history of linguistic thought in general.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521874755
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
05/31/2007
Series:
Ideas in Context Series , #80
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.83(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; List of illustrations; Note on the text; Abbreviations; 1. Introduction: the idol of the market; 2. Hartlibian beginnings; 3. From Oxford to the Royal Society; 4. Discursus: artificial languages, religion and the occult; 5. The Essay: Wilkins's 'Darling'; 6. After the Essay: reception, revision, frustration and failure; 7. Conclusion: from Pansophia to comprehension; List of manuscripts; Bibliography.

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