Languages of Belgium: French Language, German Language, West Flemish, Luxembourgish Language, Communities

Overview

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: German Language, West Flemish, Luxembourgish Language, Communities, Regions and Language Areas of Belgium, Frenchification of Brussels, Dutch Language, Partition of Belgium, Limburgish, Municipalities With Language Facilities, Names for the Dutch Language, Walloon Language, Picard Language, Belgian French, Dutch Dialects, ...

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Overview

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: German Language, West Flemish, Luxembourgish Language, Communities, Regions and Language Areas of Belgium, Frenchification of Brussels, Dutch Language, Partition of Belgium, Limburgish, Municipalities With Language Facilities, Names for the Dutch Language, Walloon Language, Picard Language, Belgian French, Dutch Dialects, Language Legislation in Belgium, Belgian Linguistic Case, Low Rhenish, Meuse-Rhenish, Belgicism, Southeast Limburgish, Flemish Sign Language, Low Dietsch, Languages of the Netherlands, Brabantian, Marols, East Flemish, Champenois, Lorrain Language. Excerpt: The Frenchification of Brussels is the transformation of Brussels, Belgium from a Dutch-speaking city to one that is bilingual or even multilingual, with French as both the majority language and lingua franca. The dominant aspect of this transition was the shift from Dutch to French among the local Flemish residents over several generations, though immigration of French-speakers and international immigration also played a role. The transition began gradually in the 18th century, but accelerated after the Belgian Revolution, with Brussels as the capital of newly independent Belgium. In spite of the Dutch-speaking majority, French was made the sole official language, and French was the language of the government, the courts, culture, the media and education. The Dutch language had a low social prestige in Belgium at the time, and knowledge of French was considered necessary for social advancement. The massive shift from Dutch to French was underway by the late 19th century. At first there was a surge in the number of bilingual residents, mostly native Dutch speakers who had learned how to speak French, at the expense of monolingual Dutch speakers. As Dutch was often not ... More: http://booksllc.net/?id=15622490

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781157606178
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 6/4/2010
  • Pages: 90
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.19 (d)

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