Lasso the Moon

Lasso the Moon

by Dennis Covington
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

When 17-year-old April Hunter first sees Fernando, it is easy to dismiss him as just another of her father's indigent Latin American patients.

Yet, despite her feelings, April can't keep herself from thinking about Fernando. How did he get the horrendous scar on his neck? What is his birthplace, El Paraiso, El Salvador, like? As curiosity turns to fascination

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

When 17-year-old April Hunter first sees Fernando, it is easy to dismiss him as just another of her father's indigent Latin American patients.

Yet, despite her feelings, April can't keep herself from thinking about Fernando. How did he get the horrendous scar on his neck? What is his birthplace, El Paraiso, El Salvador, like? As curiosity turns to fascination and fascination to love, April learns the horrifying and mind-boggling story of Fernando's life. But when she hears a different story from the Immigration and Naturalization Service, she has to wonder whom to trust.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
LASSO THE MOON Dennis Covington. Dell/Laurel-Leaf, $4.50 ISBN 0-440-22013-0. The 17-year-old daughter of a recovering alcoholic becomes friends with an illegal alien from El Salvador; PW praised the "well-observed setting" and "thoughtfully probed relationships." Ages 12-up. (Sept.) r
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-After her parents divorce and her father finally gets his alcoholism under control, April is happy to be living in his rustic island home. And yet, in a strange way, she is attached to the pain and unpredictability that used to dominate her life. Then she meets and falls in love with Fernando, 19, an illegal alien and political exile from El Salvador. He has a magnetism that is both unsettling and irresistible, and possesses strength and wisdom that contrast powerfully with his fragile appearance. She shields him from the INS investigators and educates herself in the culture and politics of his homeland. Their experiences have been radically different, yet their emotional challenges bear striking similarities. Unlike April, however, Fernando has worked through his pain, found a purpose, and is able to articulate his thoughts beautifully. Through the young woman's first-person narrative, Covington cleverly weaves together familiar YA themes with those of immigration and a foreign culture. Readers share April's compassion for Fernando and his frightening story of persecution. But he is no Prince Charming, and there is no fairy-tale ending. Fernando is a believable individual whose dash of ambiguity makes him intriguing. The author has exchanged the quirky characters and slightly bizarre world of his successful first novel, Lizard (Delacorte, 1991), for a much more realistic creation. His considerable skills as a storyteller make this book a worthy purchase.-Margaret Cole, Oceanside Library, NY
Hazel Rochman
On Saint Simons island off the coast of Georgia, high-school senior April is trying to hold things together with her physician father, a recovering alcoholic. She falls in love with Fernando, an illegal alien refugee from the war in El Salvador. As she and her father try to shelter Fernando, and he tells her about his experience with torture and death squads, she confronts her own turmoil; she moves toward forgiveness of her father and a new vision of responsibility. This doesn't have the elusive beauty of Covington's first novel, "Lizard" (1991). The plot is contrived and purposive, complete with a climactic island storm and a literature class on "Hamlet", in which April talks about finding "the kernel of joy in the grief of being alive." But there are some convincing reversals in story and character that intensify the theme of forgiveness. What's most powerful is April's awakening to her own foolish innocence: the El Salvador she imagined to be an exotic tourist paradise ("Nobody worked. Pomegranates and oranges could be plucked off the trees. . . . During fiestas there were fireworks above the rooftops") turns out to be a place of official savagery. She and Fernando compare their views of "normal" life in a scene that would be comic if it weren't so terrifying.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385321013
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
02/01/1995
Pages:
208

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >