Last Airlift: A Vietnamese Orphan's Rescue from War [NOOK Book]

Overview

Last Airlift is the true story of the last Canadian airlift operation that left Saigon and arrived in Toronto on April 13, 1975. Son Thi Anh Tuyet was one of 57 babies and children on that flight. Based on personal interviews and enhanced with archive photos, Tuyet's story of the Siagon orphanage and her flight to Canada is an emotional and suspenseful journey brought to life by the award-winning children's author, Marsha Skrypuch.
Read More Show...
See more details below
Last Airlift: A Vietnamese Orphan's Rescue from War

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$12.95 List Price

Overview

Last Airlift is the true story of the last Canadian airlift operation that left Saigon and arrived in Toronto on April 13, 1975. Son Thi Anh Tuyet was one of 57 babies and children on that flight. Based on personal interviews and enhanced with archive photos, Tuyet's story of the Siagon orphanage and her flight to Canada is an emotional and suspenseful journey brought to life by the award-winning children's author, Marsha Skrypuch.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
[The] biographical approach helps to humanize a war that, for most readers, may seem like ancient history, and the tight focus on the airlift and Tuyet's first days with the Morrises reminds readers that they are sharing the experiences of an agemate.
Cooperative Center for Children's Books Choices
Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch never strays from Tuyet's child-centered perspective in recounting her experiences. In an author's note, Skrypuch describes interviewing Tuyet (obviously now an adult), who found that she remembered more and more of the past as she talked. Dialogue takes this narrative out of the category of pure nonfiction, but Tuyet's story, with its occasional black-and-white illustrations, is no less affecting because of it.
Smithsonian Institute Book Dragon
Enhanced with documents and a surprising number of photographs, Airlift is a touching, multi-layered experience. The strength of Skrypuch's storytelling shows strongest in the smallest details.
Winnipeg Free Press
"Skrypuch, tells the true story of how this little girl is transported to Toronto and finds a loving home. She makes us feel Tuyet's fears, confusion and loneliness as she adjusts to her new home."
CM Magazine
Last Airlift is the story of an heroic deed, of one young girl's courage and resourcefulness when she most needs it, and of the ending she could not foresee . . . **Highly Recommended.**
Goodreads
"Skrypuch's prose is intimate and compelling, the many personal touches make the story come alive... Both dialogue and many wonderful photographs enliven the story. Young readers will find Last Airlift suspenseful and interesting. It will take them to a time and place they may not have heard of, but which will resonate for them through Tuyet's longing for a family to call her own."
Resource Links
"Skrypuch's gift is her ability to tell stories of under-privileged children in faraway lands. Tuyet's biography demonstrates her talent...Tuyet's story is an excellent example of the biography genre for young student; a multi-cultural perspective on being an immigrant child in Canada, and also a snapshot of a child's life during the war. This biography is a useful source for discovering the ethnic makeup of a local community and the background of an immigrant Canadian. Highly recommended."
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program blog
"Enhanced with documents and a surprising number of photographs, Airlift is a touching, multi-layered experience. The strength of Skrypuch's storytelling shows strongest in the smallest details."
The Westfield Booktalker blog
"This short narrative reads like a well-written novel, but it's the true story of Tuyet Son Thi Anh, a young girl who endured polio and war, and who was flown out of Saigon in 1975 by Americans, at the end of the Vietnam War...Her memories, as told to the author, are fascinating and poignant...Highly recommended!"
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"This biographical approach helps to humanize a war that, for most readers, may seem like ancient history, and the tight focus on the airlift and Tuyet's first days with the Morrises reminds readers that they are sharing the experiences of an agemate."
Booklist
Tuyet's remarkable true story recounts the heroic rescue on a plane bigger than her orphanage, with babies hurriedly placed in cardboard boxes and an unknown future for all. With the new foods, her own bed, eating with a fork, using a toothbrush (instead of her fingers and some salt), walking on grass (instead of rice paddies), and learning that the lights in the nighttime sky are stars instead of bombs, it's her adjustment to a foreign land and an adopted family that proves most fascinating.
Horn Book Magazine
An excellent first step on the ladder that leads to such fine immigrant tales as Thanhha Lai's Inside Out & Back Again.
Cooperative Children's Book Center Choices
"Dialogue takes this narrative out of the category of pure nonfiction, but Tuyet's story, with its occasional black-and-white illustrations, is no less affecting because of it."
Kirkus Reviews
As Saigon was falling to the North Vietnamese in April 1975, those who were caring for babies and children orphaned by the war worried about the fate of their charges. A series of evacuation flights called "Operation Babylift" carried several thousand young children to other countries around the world. Skrypuch (Daughter of War, 2008) tells the story of the last Canadian airlift through the memories of one child, Son Thi Anh Tuyet. Nearly 8 years old, the sad-eyed girl on the cover had lived nearly all her life in a Catholic orphanage. With no warning, she and a number of the institution babies were taken away, placed on an airplane and flown to a new world. Tuyet's memories provide poignant, specific details. The nuns expected her to be useful; she helped with the babies. Naturally, she assumed that John and Dorothy Morris had chosen her to help with their three children; instead, she had acquired a family. In an afterword, the author describes her research, including personal interviews and newspaper accounts from the time. But Tuyet's experience is her focus. It personalizes the babylift without sensationalizing it. The author has researched carefully and reported accurately, except where South Vietnam's soldiers are called Viet Cong. Immediate and compelling, this moving refugee story deserves a wide audience. (historical note, resources, index) (Nonfiction. 10-15)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781927485064
  • Publisher: Pajama Press
  • Publication date: 11/1/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 120
  • Sales rank: 423,142
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch's 18 award-winning books for young people include Last Airlift: A Vietnamese Orphan's Rescue from War, a Red Cedar Information Book Award winner and OLA Red Maple Honour Book. Its sequel, One Step at a Time: A Vietnamese Child Finds Her Way, is the winner of the 2014 Silver Birch NonFiction Award. In 2008, in recognition of her outstanding achievement in the development of Ukraine's culture, Marsha was awarded the Order of Princess Olha. She lives in Brantford, Ontario.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

A true story about life in a Saigon orphanage, a dramatic rescue flight from Vietnam to Canada, adoption by a Canadian family, and growing up in Canada.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2013

    I think it will be a good book

    If you arent used to or dont like reading non fiction dont let that stop you from trying new things. I really dont like reading these types of book but i am willing to give it a shot and i think you shod too.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2012

    Best book ever.

    If your intrested in Non fiction its the book for you!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)