The Last Assassin (John Rain Series #5)

The Last Assassin (John Rain Series #5)

4.4 26
by Barry Eisler
     
 

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When John Rain, the Japanese/American “contract killer with a conscience” (Entertainment Weekly), learns that his former lover, Midori, has been raising their child in New York, he senses a chance for reconciliation, perhaps even for redemption. But Midori is being watched by Rain’s enemies, and his sudden appearance puts mother and child in

Overview

When John Rain, the Japanese/American “contract killer with a conscience” (Entertainment Weekly), learns that his former lover, Midori, has been raising their child in New York, he senses a chance for reconciliation, perhaps even for redemption. But Midori is being watched by Rain’s enemies, and his sudden appearance puts mother and child in terrible danger. To save them, Rain is forced to use the same deadly talents he had been hoping to leave behind. With the help of Tatsu, his friendly nemesis in the Japanese FBI, and Dox, the ex-marine sniper whose good ol’ boy persona masks a killer as deadly as Rain himself, Rain races against time to bring his enemies into the open and eliminate them forever. But to finish the job, he’ll need one more ally: Israeli intelligence agent Delilah, a woman who represents an altogether different kind of threat...

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Japanese-American assassin John Rain is growing tired of the killing game and wants to find a way out. When he tries to reconnect with Midori, the mother of the child he's just learned he had, he runs afoul of the Yakuza, who hope to use Rain's son as leverage against him. McConnohie narrates in a resonant, deep baritone using a plain American dialect, but when voicing foreign characters, he skillfully adds just enough of an accent to differentiate them. Throughout the book, Eisler keeps the action coming at a fast and furious pace, and McConnohie is up to the task; he brings the fighting sequences vividly to life with his measured and deliberate pacing, keeping the listener fully engaged and riveted. The novel works best when Eisler sticks with Rain's point of view, less so when he shifts to other characters. McConnohie, who does a fine job in every aspect of this recording, is also at his best when bringing Rain to life. Simultaneous release with the Putnam hardcover (Reviews, Apr. 17). (July) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Assassin John Rain is back-even if he's not in the title, as in Rain Fall, etc.-and this time his effort to reconcile with former lover Midori and their child puts them in harm's way. With a whopping 25-city tour. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
"Pffft. The man quivered and sank to the ground. . . . The other guy didn't see it. . . . Pffft. I dropped him, too, another head shot." When high-end assassin John Rain is working for personal rather than professional reasons, the bodies pile up fast. This fifth volume in Eisler's series (Killing Rain, 2005, etc.) finds Rain trying to reestablish contact with his former lover, Midori. Through friends, Rain has learned he is likely the father of Midori's baby son. The problem: Midori is the daughter of one of Rain's hits, and she knows it. Another problem: One of Rain's many enemies, the yakuza Yamaoto, is using Midori and the baby to lure Rain into his murderous sights. This will not stop Rain from meeting his son; he also harbors the hope that he can reunite with Midori. Even in his strange and emotionally messy world, that would be improbable-Midori, after all, loved her father. Still, their first meeting offers a glimmer of the prospect. More importantly, storywise, once Rain lays eyes on his son, he will not stand for anything threatening the child's wellbeing. A trail of bodies follows Rain as he tracks the root problem, Yamaoto, and the denouement is a nice piece of mayhem. Rain's friend Dox, a freelance sniper, returns to lend a hand. So does Delilah, a Mossad agent placed on leave for giving Rain too much help with his last caper, who wants her relationship with Rain to move beyond that of lover. This puts Rain in a quandary regarding Midori, and it highlights Eisler's special knack for bringing nuance to the implications of Rain's nihilism. Can love really conquer all? Is Rain's retirement from work possible? When, if ever, is it acceptable to kill? Is he, purely and simply,delusional? Wicked action sequences, smoothly delineated local color and moments of introspection capture Rain in fine, fraught form.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399153594
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA)
Publication date:
06/01/2006
Series:
John Rain Series, #5
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.28(h) x 1.23(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

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Meet the Author

Barry Eisler spent three years in a covert position with the CIA's Directorate of Operations. After leaving the CIA, he lived and worked in Japan, where he earned his black belt from the Kodokan International Judo Center. The Rain books-Rain Fall, Hard Rain, Rain Storm, and Killing Rain-have won the Barry and Gumshoe awards, been translated into nearly twenty languages, and been optioned for film by Barrie Osborne, the Oscar-winning producer of the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

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Last Assassin (John Rain Series #5) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
NOOKSAN More than 1 year ago
After seeing Rain Fall the DVD - I was intrigued by a 'killer with a heart' character. Went home and googled John Rain and presto found a bunch of John Rain books by Eisler... Done went and read all six John Rain books in two months (the last two as ebooks)... Imagine how distraught I felt when I clicked on 'Fault Line' to find John Rain had apparently been "retired". Much storyline can be made to continue the Rain series such as Delilah and John, Boaz and Dox and John joining forces to fight evil forces... Don't make me beg - please Barry - more Rain - John Rain.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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John rain and dexter are my favorite antiheroes!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the first Barry Eisler book I have read. I wasn't sure I could get into a character who was an assassin...but I was quickly drawn in by the character and story line. I enjoyed this book very much and ordered 3 more to try. Hopefully they will all be as good as this one.
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
In 2002 Barry Eisler's first book in the amazing John Rain series, 'Rain Fall,' was a phenomenon. The author had performed the intriguing task of creating a hero who was a contract killer yet gave readers cause to root for him all the way. Rain is clever, complicated, compelling, and appealing. In my review of that book I wrote, 'Few fictional characters burst upon the scene fully realized, more than ready to take their place in the pantheon of unforgettable protagonists. Add one to that meager list with the creation of John Rain in Barry Eisler's dynamite debut 'Rain Fall.' In fact, Rain, an accomplished assassin doesn't just burst upon the scene, he steamrollers on to it.' The same held true in Eisler's following titles, 'Hard Rain' (2003), 'Rain Storm' (2004), 'Killing Rain' (2005), and it more than holds true today with the stellar 'The Last Assassin.' Realism is one of this author's many attributes and it shines with his latest as he evokes the steamy street and haunts of Tokyo as well as the sparkling city of Barcelona. His fight scenes raise goose bumps and his love scenes are¿.well, read for yourself. Readers may recall that Rain is the he son of an American mother and a Japanese father. He served with Special Operations in Vietnam and now, for years, has led a life of scrupulously guarded anonymity aided by one other person - Dox, an extremely likable ex Marine sniper who has an eye for the ladies and the eye of an eagle when his finger's on the trigger. He covers this skill with a country drawl, a wide grin, and an unstoppable sense of humor. Dox is the man who walked away from a five million dollar payday' to save Rain's life. He's there in an instant when Rain needs help, and the once self-sufficient assassin needs a great deal of help now. After learning that his former lover, Midori, a beautiful jazz pianist, is living with their son in New York City, Rain has hopes of reconciliation. At the very least he wants to see his son, Koichero. However, he well remembers that she swore hatred after learning that he had killed her father, a Japanese politician. In addition, Rain's arch enemy, Yamaoto, wants him dead. This is a man who will stop at nothing to kill Rain, and that includes using Midori and Koichero as bait. Rain knows they are being watched, killers are waiting for him to appear. Yet, he calls Dox to meet him in New York and takes the chance. After seeing them he yearns to change, to be able to establish a life with them, but that becomes impossible when he's forced to kill one of the men watching Midori. Rain and Dox manage to dispose of the body but that's just the beginning as Rain realizes he must kill all of his enemies, including Yamaoto in order to be free. He's aided in this by his former enemy, Tatsu, who is now a Japanese FBI agent, and wants to bring down Yamaoto almost as much as Rain does. In order for their plan to work as it should they need one more person - it is, of course, Delilah, the beautiful Israeli intelligence agent with whom Rain has been having an off and on affair. Once again Eisler has crafted an intense, can't-put-down read rich with a winning supporting cast and gasp inducing action. Just when you think this author can't get any better, he does. - Gail Cooke