The Last Books of H.G. Wells: The Happy Turning: A Dream of Life & Mind at the End of its Tether

The Last Books of H.G. Wells: The Happy Turning: A Dream of Life & Mind at the End of its Tether

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by H. G. Wells
     
 

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This volume contains the two last works by HG Wells. Nearing the end of his life, increasingly distressed over the war, Wells deals with death and apocalypse, mortality and religion, and with “human insufficiency.”
 
Mind at the End of its Tether
 
“One approaches it with awe. You come across references to it

Overview

This volume contains the two last works by HG Wells. Nearing the end of his life, increasingly distressed over the war, Wells deals with death and apocalypse, mortality and religion, and with “human insufficiency.”
 
Mind at the End of its Tether
 
“One approaches it with awe. You come across references to it everywhere: Colin Wilson, Priestly, Koestler. It seems to have been a wounding work; something no one could agree with, but something that couldn’t be taken lightly.”—Art Beck
 
“In the face of our universal inadequacy . . . man must go steeply up or down and the odds seem to be all in favor of his going down and out. If he goes up, then so great is the adaptation demanded of him that he must cease to be a man. Ordinary man is at the end of his tether.”—HG Wells
 
The Happy Turning
 
Wells’ barbed fantasies about the afterlife take the forms of “happy” dream walks. In one he converses with Jesus:
 
But being crucified upon the irreparable things that one has done, realizing that one has failed, that you have let yourself down and your poor silly disciples down and mankind down, that the God in you has deserted you—that was the ultimate torment. Even on the cross I remember shouting out something about it.”
“Eli. Eli, lama sabachthani?” I said.
Did someone get that down?” he replied.
“Don’t you read the Gospels?”
Good God, No!” he said. “How can I? I was crucified before all that.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780976684312
Publisher:
Monkfish Book Publishing Company
Publication date:
11/01/2006
Series:
Provenance Editions Series
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
991,120
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.20(d)

Meet the Author


The "father of science fiction." British author of THE OUTSIDER and many other books

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 21, 1866
Date of Death:
August 13, 1946
Place of Birth:
Bromley, Kent, England
Place of Death:
London, England
Education:
Normal School of Science, London, England

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Last Books of H.G. Wells: The Happy Turning: A Dream of Life & Mind at the End of its Tether 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
RWTWERNER More than 1 year ago
Here is a handsome, worthwhile book, reasonably priced--however, the title requires qualification. These final two works of H. G. Wells (1866-1946) are essays, pamphlets really. THE HAPPY TURNING comes in at a robust thirty-two pages; MIND AT THE END OF ITS TETHER totals twenty-four, even with a brief preface. It demands mention that there are insightful, illuminating introductions by Colin Wilson and Rudy Rucker. THE HAPPY TURNING is a whimsical account of dreams sent by his unconscious to relieve war obsession. Happy Turning Land is full of his suppressed desires and fantasies. Most notable are conversations with the modest ("I was not a bad carpenter") Jesus of Nazareth. To His mind the program He initiated just got out of hand: "NEVER have disciples." All in all, THE HAPPY TURNING is pleasant reading. MIND AT THE END OF ITS TETHER is another matter, a work mentioned rightfully as the final profoundly pessimistic thoughts of Wells (and he died of liver cancer within months of its publication). The essay concludes with some Wellsian musings on biology, but the dark heart of it is the opening half. The author detects a strange metaphysical shift in the universe: a "cosmic movement of events is increasingly adverse," and "a frightful queerness has come into life." An emerging force labelled the "Antagonist" is inimical to mankind and the universe "is going clean out of existence." He expresses hope that humanity will not end "like drunken cowards in a daze or poisoned rats in a sack." The dazed reader can certainly believe that this is the final eloquent outburst of an addled mind belonging to a formerly great writer and thinker now facing imminent death. But he or she will not have read anything like it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago