×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Last Days of Pompeii
     

Last Days of Pompeii

2.3 3
by Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Theodore H. Feder (Introduction)
 

See All Formats & Editions

Bulwer-Lytton's story of fictional events in Pompeii in the days leading up to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which destroyed the city.

Classics Illustrated tells this wonderful tale in colorful comic strip form, offering an excellent introduction for younger readers. This edition also includes a biography of Edward Bulwer-Lytton, theme discussions and study

Overview

Bulwer-Lytton's story of fictional events in Pompeii in the days leading up to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, which destroyed the city.

Classics Illustrated tells this wonderful tale in colorful comic strip form, offering an excellent introduction for younger readers. This edition also includes a biography of Edward Bulwer-Lytton, theme discussions and study questions, which can be used both in the classroom or at home to further engage the reader in the story.

The Classics Illustrated comic book series began life in 1941 with its first issue, Alexandre Dumas’ "The Three Musketeers", and has since included over 200 classic tales released around the world. This new CCS Books edition is specifically tailored to engage and educate young readers with some of the greatest works ever written, while still thrilling older readers who have loving memories of this series of old. Each book contains dedicated theme discussions and study questions to further develop the reader’s understanding and enjoyment of the work at hand.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780933772007
Publisher:
T. H. Feder Books
Publication date:
06/28/1979

Meet the Author

Edward Bulwer-Lytton (25 May 1803 – 18 January 1873) was an exremely popular English writer who coined such phrases as "the pen is mightier than the sword".

JACK KIRBY was one of the grandmasters in American comic book art, commonly nicknamed as The King. Born as Jacob Kurtzberg in New York City, he started his career in 1935 as an inbetweener on 'Popeye' and 'Betty Boop' cartoons for Max Fleischer's animation studio. He moved to the Lincoln Newspaper Syndicate in 1936, where he produced short-lived newspaper strips like 'Black Buccaneer', 'Detective Riley', Cyclone Burke', 'Abdul Jones' and 'Socko the Seadog,' which he signed with Jack Curtiss. In 1939, he briefly joined the famous Eisner-Iger comic shop. During this period, he contributed to Jumbo Comics, and drew features like 'The Lone Rider', 'Blue Bolt' and 'Blue Beetle' for companies like Novelty and Fox, using a variety of pseudonyms including Curt Davis, Fred Sande, Ted Grey, Jack Cortez and Charles Nicholas.

By 1940, Kirby began working as a team with Joe Simon, and it was during this period that Kirby developed his artistic style. After putting their stamp on the character 'Night Owl' for Prize Comics, they garnered most fame for their joint creation 'Captain America' for Timely in 1941. The character instantly became an American icon. Kirby drew him as a superhuman and soon Captain America became the country's morale-boosting anti-Nazi hero. Jack Kirby and Joe Simon collaborated until 1956. Besides Timely, they worked for several publishers, such National and Harvey Comics, where they created all kinds of new titles which became the prototypes for all the 'kid gang' comic books to follow. They drew the initial episode of 'Captain Marvel Adventures' for Fawcett in 1941, and set up titles like Boy Commandos, Newsboy Legion and Boy's Ranch. Another notable creation is 'The Black Owl' for Prize Comics.

After the War, Kirby and Simon launched 'Young Romance', the first romance title, and explored the fields of crime, horror, wester and humor comics in titles like 'Fighting American', 'Police Trap', 'Bullseye' and 'In Love', mostly through Crestwood or their own comic book company Mainline. By 1956, Kirby slowly parted with Simon, cooperating only on 'The Fly' and 'Private Strong' for Archie Comics. During this time, he also produced a lot of work of National/DC and drew some issues of Classics Illustrated for Gilberton. After working with inker Wallace Wood on 'Skymasters' and on 'Challengers of the Unknown' for DC, he returned to Timely, now called Marvel, where he heralded in a new era of superhero comics with writer/editor Stan Lee.

Together with Lee, he launched the landmark 'Fantastic Four' in 1961, shortly afterwards followed by 'Thor' in 1962 and a new rendition of 'Captain America' in 1964. Kirby defined Marvel's house style and set up a great many of the company's present-day key characters. Other well-known titles he graphically initiated are 'The Incredible Hulk' (1962), 'The X-Men' (1963), and 'The Silver Surfer' (1966).

Kirby, Lee and Marvel rose to the top of the industry and many claim they completely revamped the comic book world. After a disagreement with Lee, Kirby left Marvel in 1970 to return to DC as a writer/editor/artist, where he created nearly a dozen titles, but none were as successful as his Marvel work. Among his creations for DC are 'The Fourth World' and its subtitles 'New Gods', 'Mister Miracle' and 'The Forever People, as well as 'Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen', 'OMAC', 'Kamandi' and 'The Demon'. He also joined Joe Simon once again in a new version of 'The Sandman'.

However, by the mid-1970s, he did new work for Marvel again, including 'The Eternals', '2001: A Space Odyssey' and the 'Black Panther', featuring the first black superhero. In 1979-80, he did an adaptation of the Walt Disney movie 'The Black Hole' for the syndicated 'Walt Disney's Treasury of Classic Tales' series. He also ventured into animation, doing designs on among others 'Turbo Teen' and 'Thundarr the Barbarian'. In the 1980s Kirby drew 'Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers' and 'Silver Star' for Pacific Comics, 'Destroyer Duck' for Eclipse Comics and 'Super Powers' for DC.

In his 50-year career, Jack Kirby produced many of the field's most successful concepts and has been responsible for more comic book sales than any other artist, writer or editor. Jack Kirby passed away on 6 February 1994.

RICHARD "DICK" AYERS was born in Ossining, New York, in 1924. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II, where he published his first comic strip 'Radio Ray' in the Army newspaper Radio Post in 1942. Afterwards he attended the Cartoonists and Illustrators School. Dick Ayers has done much comic work, including penciling, inking, lettering and coloring for most of the major comic publishers, such as Marvel, DC, Timely and Atlas.

Richard Ayers is best known for his work on comics of the gold and silver ages. He has been doing comic books since 1948 when he was assigned to do the Jimmy Durante Comic Book by Magazine Enterprises after he had penciled a couple of stories for the 'Funnyman' comic book by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in late 1947. His most popular work includes drawing for such Marvel Comics as 'The Fantastic Four', 'The Incredible Hulk', 'Sgt. Fury', 'Calico Kid' and 'The Ghost Rider'. He also pencilled, inked and lettered for Charlton Comics in the mid-1950s.

Dick Ayers stayed with M.E. Comics until 1956, having also worked on 'The Avenger'. He switched to the Timely/Atlas/Marvel group, and it was there that he did the most of his production. He started as an inker on 'Human Torch', and penciled and inked 'Rawhide Kid', 'Outlaw Kid', 'Wyatt Earp and Two-Gun Kid', 'Captain America', 'The Hulk' and 'Sgt. Fury' (with John Severin), to name but a few. In the late 1970s and early 80s he also worked freelance on 'Archie' comics.

Richard Ayers also was a teacher at the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art and gave classes at the Guggenheim Museum. After a break, he returned to comics in 1996 to do the thriller 'Dr. Wonder', and is still active in the comics field today.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Last Days Of Pompeii 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think everyone should read this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Bulwer Lytton was fascinated by the discovery of bodies preserved by lava and ash, and he constructed this story almost like a mystery, so that it accounted for the manner of death for several of the bodies that were excavated. He made use of the academic understanding of his day in his descriptions of settings. However... he made most of his lead characters Greek (not Roman), he threw in some wildly improbable events, and he told the story in verbose Victorian melodramatic style. It's fun to read as a period piece, but if you want background for a trip to Pompeii, this won't help you much.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Couldnt get past page 47- no action- dull and full of archaic language