Last Friend

Overview

"Tangiers, the late 1950s. Two teenagers, Mamed and Ali, strike up an intense friendship that will last a lifetime. But lurking just beneath the surface is a deep, unspoken jealousy in danger of destroying them both." "Decades later, the two friends, wiser and world-weary, offer differing accounts of their relationship's twists and turns, from their rebellious youth spent subverting the rigid moral strictures of the day to harrowing months spent together as political prisoners, and their eventual settling into conventional family lives. Only then ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$21.29
BN.com price
(Save 3%)$21.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $2.50   
  • Used (13) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

"Tangiers, the late 1950s. Two teenagers, Mamed and Ali, strike up an intense friendship that will last a lifetime. But lurking just beneath the surface is a deep, unspoken jealousy in danger of destroying them both." "Decades later, the two friends, wiser and world-weary, offer differing accounts of their relationship's twists and turns, from their rebellious youth spent subverting the rigid moral strictures of the day to harrowing months spent together as political prisoners, and their eventual settling into conventional family lives. Only then do the real differences between them emerge, culminating in an unimaginable and unforgettable act of betrayal." The Last Friend is both a coming-of-age story and a portrait of Morocco in an era of repression and disillusionment. Ben Jelloun captures the complexities and contradictions of a lifelong friendship and a singular threat to its existence.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In his affecting new novel, Moroccan-French novelist Ben Jalloun (The Blinding Absence of Light) eloquently portrays postcolonial political unrest in Morocco through the long, ultimately ruptured friendship between two men. The novel is set over 40 years of Moroccan history, beginning in 1960 (a few years after Moroccan independence from France), when the two friends, Ali and Mamed, attend a French school in Tangier. The story tracks their joint political activism and imprisonment in the mid-'60s, professional and romantic successes, and marital disappointment. The two voices share the narrative evenly: first, Ali, an academic, tells his side of their falling-out. Mamed, a doctor who in later years moves with his family to Sweden, ails from a "strange, neurotic relationship with [his] homeland" and, eventually, from lung cancer. Mamed precipitates a self-protective rift with Ali before dying. A long posthumous letter to Ali explains that Mamed had hoped to spare their friendship from the ravages of death-and yet, has Mamed acted finally from jealousy and spite? Their friendship becomes a journey through their Moroccan heritage, skillfully navigated by Ben Jalloun. (Feb.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Can a 30-year friendship be destroyed by a letter? In the latest by Moroccan-French novelist Jelloun, winner of the International Dublin/IMPAC Award in 2004, an ordinary friendship between two men is challenged during a time of great political uncertainty in Morocco. The effect of the letter-and its effect on the friendship-is known from the start, but the contents of the letter is kept secret for most of the book. The story begins in 1960s Tangier, when Ali and Mamed meet as 15-year-old classmates. Their relationship initially revolves around sexual experimentation and the questioning of authority and tradition. Ali then moves to Canada to study film, and Mamed goes to medical school in France. When they return for summer vacation, they are imprisoned as student activists, and their shared ordeal seals their friendship. Mamed eventually becomes a doctor, moving to Stockholm and getting a position with the World Health Organization; Ali stays in Morocco and becomes a professor of geography. The narrative is told from two viewpoints: first Ali recounts their history, then Mamed tells his side of the same story. A mutual friend, Ramon, shares his perspective in a short chapter that reconciles the two versions. Reminiscent of Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner, this very literary novel is recommended for academic libraries or serious literature collections in large public libraries.-Debbie Bogenschutz, Cincinnati State Technical & Community Coll. Lib. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In this consideration of the meaning of friendship, desertion and lies become an expression of loyalty. Mamed and Ali have been best friends since their school days in Tangiers. They discover sex together, in brothels and with their willing but necessarily circumspect peers-girls who cheerfully embrace sodomy as a means of preserving their virginity for marriage. Through aimlessness as much as conviction, they become involved in left-wing politics, and both are imprisoned. In prison, each man saves the other's life. Although both marry women who are jealous of the friendship, it survives, remaining the main relationship in the men's lives even after Mamed leaves Tangiers to take a long-term job in Stockholm. One day, without warning and for apparently fanciful reasons, Mamed turns on Ali, brutally accuses him of using the friendship to steal from Mamed's family, and refuses to ever see or speak to him again. Ben Jelloun (Islam Explained, 2002, etc.) tells his story in three first-person narratives: The first is from the perspective of Ali, the abandoned friend; then Mamed tells the same history, exposing the reason for his rejection of Ali; finally, a mutual friend of both adds a postscript. This structure is employed to depict the delicate shades of difference between similar minds. The tone is placid, at times almost bored. The only characters of importance are the friends, and the book suggests that the ultimate significance of a life can be expressed in a single relationship. In making that relationship humdrum, passionless and lacking in substance, the author has produced a work that may be likened to a long, disappointed sigh. A gentle, intelligent exercise in nihilism: Life,Jelloun seems to say with a pained smile, is hardly worth discussing.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781595580085
  • Publisher: New Press, The
  • Publication date: 2/1/2006
  • Pages: 186
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 5.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Tahar Ben Jelloun was born in Fez, Morocco, and immigrated to France in 1961. A novelist, essayist, critic, and poet, he is a regular contributor to Le Monde, La Républica, El País, and Panorama.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)