The Last Invisible Boy [NOOK Book]

Overview

MY NAME IS FINN GARRETT AND THIS IS MY STORY.

I don't want to give anything away, so I'll tell ...
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The Last Invisible Boy

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Overview

MY NAME IS FINN GARRETT AND THIS IS MY STORY.

I don't want to give anything away, so I'll tell you what you could probably guess from looking at the cover and flipping through the book.

1. It's about an invisible boy. Obviously. That's me. Actually, I'm not totally invisible. Yet. But I'm getting there.

2. There are a bunch of my drawings.

3. There are some really funny, really happy moments.

4. Just so you know, there are also some sad moments.

5. Everything in here is the truth. So if you like stories about true things, you might like this book.

That's all I'm going to tell you. All the stuff about my dad and my mom and my brother Derek and my friend Meli and whether or not I actually turn invisible or become completely visible again or figure out how to use my invisibility for the good of all mankind or just disappear altogether, you're going to have to read to find out.

So, let's get started. Just remember: This is my story, and anything can happen.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Were Jeff Kinney's Wimpy Kid to be suddenly bereaved, his next diary might approximate this painful but often funny novel, written by the author of the adult work Wolf Boy and illustrated by a debut graphic artist. Keeping a notebook, 12-year-old Finn Garrett explains in an early entry that a few months before, "a giant eraser fell from the sky and flattened me.... It's been erasing me from the world ever since." His father has died unexpectedly (in circumstances described only near the end), and Finn's black hair and pink complexion are gradually turning white (Coovert's cartoon shows a gray Finn looking into a mirror and seeing a vampire reflected back). As Finn remembers perfect moments with his father, avoids school as long as possible and compares his mother's and paternal grandfather's attitudes about death, he is made to see his pediatrician as well as a kindly school psychologist, who have their own theories about the "whiteness thing." Precise in his metaphors and his characterizations, Kuhlman delivers a study in coping with loss that middle-schoolers will want to absorb and empathize with. Ages 10-14. (Nov.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Melissa Zanot
If you or any of your students have read the book by Sherman Alexie titled The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, you have seen how powerful illustrations can be when telling the story of a young boy. Finn believes that after the death his father he is turning invisible. Finn's hair turns white, his skin grows paler, and people begin to notice the changes. Finn worries that he might be really turning invisible so he sits down to start writing and illustrating his life story. The book talks about his friends, family and the death of his father. The book does an excellent job of showing how an unexpected death can upset the routine of a family. The illustrations are well done and clearly show what Finn has a hard time telling. These illustrations allow Finn a chance to demonstrate his feelings, which are difficult for him to express. Kuhlman offers readers an opportunity to see and read the story of a boy who might remind them of themselves. Reviewer: Melissa Zanot
School Library Journal

Gr 5-7

This illustrated novel, reminiscent in style of Jeff Kinney's Diary of a Wimpy Kid (Abrams, 2007), is sure to have huge appeal. Finn Garrett tells the tender yet humorous story of how he begins to disappear following his beloved dad's sudden death. The 12-year-old awakens the morning after the day when everything changes to find a strand of white hair and less "pinkness" to his skin. Each day he grows whiter and less visible. He begins to write a memoir, which is really an account of his and his family's grief over their devastating loss. While poignant and sad, the book is ultimately upbeat as they begin to heal. At times Finn feels he is being erased because he failed to save his dad. At other times he wonders if he is aging in order to get closer to him. He recounts memory after memory, ultimately realizing the importance of them, and of being the keeper of his father's stories. Finn sees a therapist, and eventually he, his mother, his grandpa, his little brother, and his friend Melanie move beyond their initial pain. Finn's invisibility reverses itself and he becomes a boy who has managed to hold on to the world. The book's engaging, intimate tone is enhanced by Finn frequently addressing readers. Stop signs placed at points when he is overwhelmed with feeling add to the tenderness. The language and style are pitch-perfect middle school, and the illustrations ably capture the boy's memories and moods.-Connie Tyrrell Burns, Mahoney Middle School, South Portland, ME

Kirkus Reviews

Grief-stricken after the sudden death of his father, Finn starts turning invisible in this magical-realism tale of recovery. Finn's story starts in media res, his father dead and his invisibility far progressed, with his skin the color of paper and his formerly brown hair whitening. When he returns to school sometime after the death, the bullying jeers about his freakish new coloring are his only distraction from the awkward attempts at sympathy from teachers and friends. Through a series of brief vignettes illustrated by Finn's own cartoons, he recalls his picture-perfect relationship with his father, from games of midnight baseball to father-son motorcycle rides. It takes time for Finn to recognize the grief of others—his mother, his grandfather—and to start on the path to recovery along with his mother and kid brother. Finn's poignant story is a quietly believable tale of one family's journey through grief. Coovert's cartoons add a nice touch of bittersweet humor. (Fiction. 10-12)

From the Publisher
"The Last Invisible Boy is at turns heartbreaking and uplifting...A gutsy book that will stay with me a long time." — Jeff Kinney, author of Diary of a Wimpy Kid

"The Last Invisible Boy may be written as a journal, but it's no blog. Protagonist Finn isn't writing for an audience — he's writing to a friend. Sad, funny, and sincere." — Hope Larson, Eisner Award-winning creator of Chiggers

"If you're looking for a tender, redemptive story told by a fierce, fragile protagonist, meet Finn Garrett, the Last Invisible Boy. You'll love him." — Susan Patron, author of the Newbery Medal-winning The Higher Power of Lucky

* “This illustrated novel, reminiscent in style of Jeff Kinney's Diary of a Wimpy Kid, is sure to have huge appeal.” -SLJ, *STAR

* “Precise in his metaphors and his characterizations, Kuhlman delivers a study in coping with loss that middle-schoolers will want to absorb and empathize with.” -Publishers Weekly, *STAR

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416999089
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 11/24/2009
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 629,094
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 930L (what's this?)
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

J. P. Coovert attended the Center for Cartoon Studies. This is his first illustrated work for children. You can see more of his work at www.onepercentpress.com.
Evan Kuhlman is the author of Brother from a Box, the critically acclaimed The Last Invisible Boy, Great Ball of Light, and the highly lauded novel for adults Wolf Boy. He lives in Ohio. Visit him at EvanKuhlman.com.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 29 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(6)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2012

    If you like sad books...

    This book is sad at parts but it will still be an enjoyable read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2012

    Sad

    I mean,it was well written and agreat read,but i honestly thought it would be like diary of a wimpy kid. It was sad and a depressed boy but it is really good please read it!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2012

    Read this book!

    This is a very sweet book about a quirky boy, Finn Garrett. After what he calls " The Terrible Day That Ruined Everything" Finn starts going through a strange change. His hair is going from black to white and his skin is turning paler. No one knows why its happening, but Finn tries to go with it.
    This book is a bit like diary of a wimpy kid, what with the drawings, but it is very different. There are a lot of deep moments in this book about loss and grief, not that Finn is completely depressed. There are also moments of love and complete giddiness. Finn is a very thoughtful boy, who thinks deeply about everything. This book is his journal, where he writes down all the sad and happy moments of his life. Lots of funny moments, a few sad ones, mild language. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE READ THIS BOOK!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 2, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The cover was cool and I expected this to be a kind of emotional

    The cover was cool and I expected this to be a kind of emotional story about a boy who's heart is slowing cracking from the loss of something dear, but it wasn't very well-written so I didn'tt get as sad I would have wanted. (Yes, I actually like feeling sad during books). It's an okay book though, but would not be in my top 100. Ever.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    MY opinon

    One of the best books ever made! I hpoe there are mord books of this!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    Very sad and not at all what the back cover represents

    I expected this book to be a bit of an adventure, based on the back cover. It's actually a diary of a boy who is depressed over the death of his father. The boy describes the day his dad dies, the funeral, and how he goes to the gravesite everyday. It was not at all entertaining, and I would not have read it if I knew what it was about. I read the whole thing, hoping it would get better. It sort of did, at the end. As better as it can get after a child loses a parent. My son also felt it was awful (he's 10 and a strong reader) and was sorry he'd wasted his money on it.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2013

    Rdd

    Cool story bro :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2013

    Awsome

    I got this book in a paperback on June 13th 2013 and im still reading it. Im on chapter 72 but when im reading the book in the car or in my room I can't stop reading it. Its about the story of Finn Garett and how he thinks hes turning invisible. It can get sad it can cuss and it can get romantic. I give it 5 stars

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    Yelnats

    Good

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2013

    Good

    Good book
    Sad
    Meaningful
    Moving
    You should read it.
    Its a book about the things that matter and overcoming grief

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2012

    Fantastic

    I read this book in sixth grade and in seventh grade I had to do a book report. I remembered this book and I did my report on it. This is the best book I probably ever read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    Suck saids paige

    It is the worst book l have ever read

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    Horrible

    This book isn't what I thought it was going to be. Don't get it no matter what!!

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 25, 2011

    Bad sample

    I wanted to get the sample to see how it was and i wish it gave me a little more for it but a sample is a sample but it was still good

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2011

    sorry

    i am sorry about the and i n the other text.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    did not meet expectations

    The Last Invisible Boy was a cute story, but was not at all what I expected. The back cover made the book seem interesting and full of adventures of a young boy through his school years. It made you want to read it because of the way the boy portrayed himself, mysterious, humorous, and interesting. This book is definitely aimed more towards 7-10 year olds than anything and would definitely be a good read for them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 18, 2010

    Awesome Book! You should check it.

    I am doing a project on it. It is sweet.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 Customer Reviews

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