The Last Light of the Sun

The Last Light of the Sun

4.0 45
by Guy Gavriel Kay
     
 

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From the multiple award-winning author of Tigana, A Song for Arbonne, and the three-book Fionavar Tapestry that "can only be compared to Tolkien's masterpiece" (Star-Phoenix), this powerful, moving saga evokes the Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, and Norse cultures of a thousand years ago.

Author Biography: Guy Gavriel Kay has been awarded the International

Overview

From the multiple award-winning author of Tigana, A Song for Arbonne, and the three-book Fionavar Tapestry that "can only be compared to Tolkien's masterpiece" (Star-Phoenix), this powerful, moving saga evokes the Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, and Norse cultures of a thousand years ago.

Author Biography: Guy Gavriel Kay has been awarded the International Goliardos Prize for his work in the literature of the fantastic, is a two-time winner of the Aurora Award, and has been nominated three times for the World Fantasy Award. His works have been translated into 21 languages.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
The Barnes & Noble Review
Guy Gavriel Kay's The Last Light of the Sun is a compelling historical fantasy in which fate throws together three warring societies -- Anglcyn (Anglo-Saxon), Cyngael (Welsh), and Erling (Viking) -- in a brutal conflict that brings both heartrending sorrow and unexpected joy.

In a world where Erling marauders regularly raid Anglcyn and Cyngael villages and bloodshed is a part of everyday life, only the strong survive. Bern Thorkellson is a survivor, although his life can't exactly be described as fortunate; the son of an ill-tempered Erling named Red Thorkell, Bern recklessly seeks vengeance against the man who stole his father's prize horse. Aeldred, legendary king of the Anglcyn, struggles to protect -- and enlighten -- his countrymen against all odds. After witnessing the murder of his brother, the Cyngael prince Alun tries to save his soul from supernatural forces. Then the destinies of all three intertwine.

Adeptly researched with ingeniously intricate tangential plotlines ("…actions ripple, in so many ways, and for so long…"), this offering is sure to please and surprise fans of Kay's previous historical fantasies (Tigana, A Song for Arbonne, et al.). Gloriously complex and riveting, The Last Light of the Sun is archetypal Kay. Fans of first-rate historical fantasies like Marion Zimmer Bradley's Avalon sequence and Stephen R. Lawhead's Celtic Crusades trilogy who have yet to experience Kay's storytelling prowess should make it a point to pick up one of his novels immediately. Paul Goat Allen
The Washington Post
Kay's latest, The Last Light of the Sun, is a historical fantasy of the highest order, the work of a man who may well be the reigning master of the form … Kay's novel is an ambitious entertainment that transcends the historical record, offering cogent observations on fathers and sons, on the power of grief, on faith, courage, loyalty and the inevitability of change. — Bill Sheehan
Publishers Weekly
In this wonderfully imaginative historical fantasy from Kay (A Song for Arbonne), seemingly random deeds connect Erling (Viking) raiders and Anglcyn (English) and Cyngael (Welsh) princes: If only Bern Thorkellson hadn't stolen that horse in a desperate act of vengeance against his sorry fate; if only Dai ab Owyn hadn't stepped outside the safety of Brynfell right at the moment when the Erlings attacked; if only Ivarr Ragnarson hadn't been born ill-formed and downright cruel; if only Aeldred hadn't been king of the Anglcyn; if only Thorkell Einarson had murdered only one man and not the second; if only Alun ab Owyn hadn't stepped into that pool on a moonless night and seen the Queen of the Elves in procession. At first glance, each individual's act appears to be a normal human response. It's only later, as the characters' paths cross, that the pieces come together to weave a dazzling tapestry of conjoined fates. Solid research, filtered through vibrant prose, serves to convey a sense of how people really lived and died in Viking and Anglo-Saxon times and how they might have interacted with the realm of magic on a daily basis. Readers of lighter fantasy should be forewarned-the novel contains a lot of gruesome killing and the fairy world plays a relatively minor role, as do women. (Mar. 2) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Driven from his northern home for crimes committed by his father, Bern Thorkellson finds his destiny across the sea, in the lands of the Angles and the Gaels, traditional enemies of his people. Set during the time of the Viking raids, the latest historical fantasy by the author of Tigana and A Song for Arbonne brings depth and texture to the ancient tales of the Norse lands. Kay's consummate storytelling and fidelity to the spirit of his subject matter make this novel a solid addition to most fantasy collections and a good selection for fans of historical fiction and Celtic or Norse legends. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451459657
Publisher:
Roc Books
Publication date:
03/02/2004
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
6.38(w) x 9.18(h) x 1.59(d)

Meet the Author

Guy Gavriel Kay is an internationally bestselling author. He has been awarded the International Goliardos Prize for his work in the literature of the fantastic, is a two-time winner of the Aurora Award, and won the 2008 World Fantasy Award for Ysabel. His works have been translated into twenty-five languages.

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Last Light of the Sun 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Ronin27 More than 1 year ago
I read "Under Heaven" by Kay and was simply amazed by the writing, characters, and setting... simply awed... could not buy another Kay book fast enough... "The Last Light of The Sun" reads in a very clunky, unpolished manner... shallow characters... does not seem like same writer...
Jeffrey Lambert More than 1 year ago
Although this book doesn't hold a candle to Kay's 'Lions of al-Rassan' it is still a very good book. Kay does a particularly good job creating a world that mirrors the history of European kingdoms and their struggles with the Norsemen of the age.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been a huge fan of Guy Gavriel Kay since the first time I read Tigana, after which I scoured bookstores to find anything else he'd written. I must agree with one of the other reviewers, in that I was disappointed. The poetry of his other works is missing and I wasn't as drawn in they way I have been with his other works. While I don't regret buying this book, I don't think it will win him many new loyal readers. If you're already a fan, I'm sure you'll read it anyway. If someone else recommended that you read Kay, start with any of this other novels and come back to this one once you're hooked. I would hate for anyone to start with this one and miss out on his other works.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My copies of Kay¿s works are well-worn, well-read, and well-loved. 'The Last Light of the Sun' takes its place upon my shelf, but I do not feel as much affection for it as I do for his other works. The story is well told, the phrasing is flawless, and it is certainly enjoyable to read, but there is a certain flatness, a missing spark of magic that runs through most of his works. For lovers of Historical Fantasy, this is a must-read. For lovers of Kay¿s work, enjoy, but don¿t expect it to resonate as much as his other works.
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Looked up at the Imperator.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sighs and looks over at a bush. Sees blue eyes and pads over,curious
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Watch in the shadows
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