The Last Nazi

( 5 )

Overview

The author of the blockbuster New York Times bestseller The Fourth Procedure weaves a terrifying story about a virus turned weapon of mass destruction.

Stan Pottinger goes where no one else dares—taking crucial medical and social issues and turning them into riveting thrillers. Melissa Gale is an attractive, ambitious lawyer and investigator for the Office of Special Investigations, the Justice Department’s “Nazi Hunters.” Her quarry, known only by the name “Adalwolf,” was the ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Audiobook)
  • All (11) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $33.64   
  • Used (7) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$33.64
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(94)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Audiobook CD New 1559279702 Brand New in the original manufacturers wrap-I ship FAST with FREE tracking! !

Ships from: Waresboro, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$47.95
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(24)

Condition: New
CD New Box Set of 5 CDs Audiobook Brand New in Excellent Condition! ! Factory Sealed. Exactly As Shown in Picture and As Product Details. Read by Paul Hecht & Maggy-Megg Reed. ... Running time: 6 hours on 5 CDs. 'The Last Nazi (Audio CD Audiobook) [5 Audio CDs]' ISBN # 1559279702. Ship with Signature Delivery Confirmation. Fast Shipping, Reliable Service, Customer Satisfaction and Money Back Guaranteed! ! Thank You! ! Read more Show Less

Ships from: Prospect, CT

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$51.49
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(362)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$58.77
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(213)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

The author of the blockbuster New York Times bestseller The Fourth Procedure weaves a terrifying story about a virus turned weapon of mass destruction.

Stan Pottinger goes where no one else dares—taking crucial medical and social issues and turning them into riveting thrillers. Melissa Gale is an attractive, ambitious lawyer and investigator for the Office of Special Investigations, the Justice Department’s “Nazi Hunters.” Her quarry, known only by the name “Adalwolf,” was the brilliant young protégé of Dr. Josef Mengele, the Butcher of Auschwitz. Presumed dead for almost fifty years, Adalwolf has suddenly reappeared in the United States to take the lives of three people in a chilling, unusual way. Drawing on research started in the Nazi labs, Adalwolf is about to unleash a terrifying virus using Melissa’s soon-to-be born baby as a trigger. The tension builds unbearably as Melissa’s race to save her baby and stop Adalwolf forces her to confront the boundaries of good and evil.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
It's difficult to come up with a fresh Nazi scenario without resorting to the cloning gambit, but Pottinger (The Fourth Procedure; A Slow Burning) succeeds admirably in this hair-raising thriller. His villain, Adalwolf, the 16-year-old foster son of Dr. Josef Mengele, joins the short list of fiction's baddest bad boys from the very first sentence. The setting is Auschwitz, Christmas Eve, 1944: "He heard a soft voice, a little girl's voice, singing quietly in the operating room. When it stopped, Adalwolf told her to keep singing, there was no need to be afraid, everything was going to be fine." The reader understands that nothing from here on out is going to be fine. Fifty-eight years later, gutsy Melissa Gale, a lawyer for the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations, joins a SWAT team as they blast through the door of an apartment where the elderly Adalwolf is hiding. Melissa has been hunting this particular Nazi for five years, and he's taunted her throughout the chase. Adalwolf has murdered three people in the process of cooking up a deadly virus that threatens to kill every Jew in the world. The concept of a designer virus dedicated to wiping out one particular ethnic or racial group has been fielded, but Pottinger's take is by far the best of the bunch. Add a kidnapped child, more cold-blooded murder and a pregnant heroine who may be carrying the deadly plague along with her baby, and you've got a lethal prescription for a stay-up-all-night read. Agents, Joni Evans and Owen Laster. (Aug.) Forecast: St. Martin's is laying on a four-city author tour and a national radio advertising campaign to get the word out on this one. That plus Pottinger's past readership should push him onto some lists. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
In 1944, Adalwolf, the foster son of Dr. Mengele, is responsible for calming children who are slated to undergo fatal medical experiments at Auschwitz-Birkenau. Fifty-eight years later, Adalwolf is living in the United States under an assumed identity. In public, he is a doctor with his own fertility clinic; in private, he is working on a deadly virus that functions only when certain genetic markers are present. Melissa Gale, a lawyer for the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations (the "Nazi hunters"), is trying to have a baby with her journalist husband, David. What seems at first a well-developed subplot soon reveals itself to be a major issue. Melissa learns that she is about to be turned into an ethnic biological weapon of mass destruction, capable of wiping out the 13 million Jews in the world. On this premise, rendered believable by thorough research and convincing characterization, Pottinger (The Fourth Procedure) spins a tale that grabs the reader by the throat as it takes stunning twists and turns in its drive to a heart-stopping conclusion. Be prepared to feel horror for a villain who is not only the last Nazi but also one of the most terrifying. Highly recommended.-Ronnie H. Terpening, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781559279703
  • Publisher: Macmillan Audio
  • Publication date: 8/1/2003
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Abridged
  • Product dimensions: 5.64 (w) x 5.02 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

Stan Pottinger is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School. He practiced law in California and served as director of the Office for Civil Rights at the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and as assistant attorney general of the Civil Rights Division, Department of Justice, in Washington, D.C. He is the New York Times bestselling author of The Fourth Procedure. Mr. Pottinger lives in the New York City area.

 

Paul Hecht is a Canadian stage, film, and television actor. His was nominated for a Tony award for his performance in the Broadway play Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead. He's also performed in 1776, The Rothschilds, The Great God Brown, Caesar and Cleopatra, Noises Off, and The Invention of Love. He garnered an Obie Award for his performance in the off-Broadway production of Enrico IV. On television, Paul has been seen on Kate and Allie, Law & Order, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, As the World Turns, Starsky and Hutch, Remington Steele, Miami Vice, and Queer as Folk. Paul’s long career in audiobooks spans dozens of titles and authors as varied as Ray Bradbury and Gore Vidal, Jack Finney and Thomas Mann. In reviewing his performance in Stan Pottinger's The Last Nazi, published by Macmillan Audio, AudioFile magazine said, "Paul Hecht and Maggi-Meg Reed deliver a chilling tale with voices that speed up with the intensity of the plot and mesh well with each other. A must listen."

 

Maggi-Meg Reed has performed as an actress and singer both on and off Broadway. She is the narrator of numerous popular audiobooks including Alex Kava's One False Move, Sebastien Japrisot's A Very Long Engagement, and Audrey Niffenegger's The Time Traveler's Wife. Maggi-Meg is a multiple Audie nominee, Earphones winner, and AudioFile Featured Narrator. In 2008, she was named the Best Voice in Fiction & Classics by AudioFile magazine. Her voice is also heard on television and radio commercials across the country. She lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

The Last Nazi

CHRISTMAS EVE, 1944

Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp Poland

He heard a soft voice, a little girl's voice, singing quietly in the operating room. When it stopped, Adalwolf told her to keep singing, there was no need to be afraid, everything was going to be fine. Twelve-year-old Ben didn't need to guess what was going on in there. He knew.

Sitting in the darkened anteroom, Ben stared out the frosted windows, anxiously waiting for a kapo to come and take him back to his barracks. It was ten o'clock at night, and a blanket of snow had turned the camp unusually quiet. The boilers in the clinic had been turned off, leaving it bone-chillingly cold, and Crematorium V was working at reduced capacity so that more SS officers could be home with their families. Ben wondered why Adalwolf, the sixteen-year-old foster son of Dr. Mengele, wasn't one of them, but evidently this was where he preferred to be. Apparently this was his Christmas present to himself.

Ben nervously fingered an ivory pendant hanging on a chain around his neck, then unwrapped a piece of chocolate and held it lightly on his fingertips to keep it from melting. The door to the operating room was slightly ajar, casting a long shard of light across the anteroom floor. He could hear Adalwolf still trying to convince the little girl that everything was fine, but to no avail. And no wonder: That was Ben's job. Lacking the warmth to tell a comforting lie, Adalwolf had conscripted him to calm the children who were about to undergo one of Dr. Mengele's procedures. Sometimes Ben did it by teaching them a song; sometimes by giving them a piece of chocolate or a toy that Dr. Mengele had made available. Regardless of how he did it, he knew what to do—so why hadn't Adalwolf asked him to talk to the girl? Why bring him here if he wasn't going to use him?

He ran his hand through his dirty hair. Maybe he should knock and let him know he was here. Then he caught himself.

Rule number one in the camp: Don't volunteer. For anything. Ever.

He wiggled his toes nervously in his thin shoes. Snow had melted down his ankles, turning the leather soggy. He'd been there for nearly half an hour. Where was that kapo?

The snowflakes were coming down harder now, blanketing the muddy paths and powdering the trees in the Little Wood. Ben wondered if he'd ever see another snowfall in his hometown of Vakhnovka, wondered if he'd smell the flowers in the cornfields in spring. He wondered about many things until he remembered it was better not to wonder about any.

He lifted the ivory pendant—it had come from a woman prisoner—and kissed it for good luck, even though he didn't believe in luck anymore. Survival in this place didn't depend on good fortune, hard work, or any of the virtues he'd been taught as a child. Survival depended on one thing: obedience. Calming frightened children was simply doing what he'd been told, although, as far as he was concerned, it was also a good deed. If ever he was in their shoes, he hoped someone would do the same for him.

He exhaled impatiently, then stood up and crept over to the operating-room door, careful not to touch it for fear of making it creak. What was there to be curious about? He'd been inside the room many times and knew it well: the holding cots, the operating tables, the metal autopsy islands, the countertops with bell-shaped jars and stainless-steel tools, the formaldehyde, the gooseneck lamps lighting bare walls.

He peeked through the crack and saw the little girl sitting on a sheet-covered gurney, shivering and scrawny from rations of stale bread, margarine, and black coffee. In her hands was a red-and-silver Christmas tree ornament that reminded Ben of a fishing pole bobber about to be dropped into a summer pond. A summer in a different life, a pond in a forgotten world.

Adalwolf's white lab coat moved in front of the slender opening, blocking Ben's view. Even though he was only sixteen, Adalwolf's uniform and chiseled face gave him the bearing of a grown-up Nazi doctor.

"Sing to me," Adalwolf said, prompting the girl with a few bars of "Silent Night."

Instead, she sat quietly.

"Come, come, Rochele," Adalwolf said. "If you sing, everything will be fine." He held her hand and, after a little more cajoling, she stopped sniffling and tried again.

"Stille Nacht ... Heilige Nacht ..."

The little girl kept singing softly, clutching the Christmas tree ornament against her belly.

"Alles schaft, einsam wacht ..."

Ben heard the hiss of a bottle being opened. As he craned his neck to see where Adalwolf had gone, tears filled his eyes, some from the chemical fumes, some from the ache in his heart. He squeezed the pendant through his shirt and stuffed it into his mouth. The aroma of melted chocolate on his fingers mingled with the smell of chloroform.

The little girl was singing the last stanza now: "Schlafe in himmlischer Ruh." Ben held his breath, closed his eyes, and waited for what was to happen next.

It didn't happen.

The door opened abruptly, bumping Ben's shoulder and jolting open his eyes. Adalwolf stood in the doorway looking down at him, a chloroformfilled syringe held in one rubber-gloved hand while the other reached for Ben's chocolate-covered fist. He pried the boy's fingers off the pendant, lifted it from around his neck, and held it up between them.

"You shouldn't have taken it, Ben," he said, dropping it into his lab coat pocket.

Ben volunteered nothing. His flushed cheeks did it for him.

"Don't worry," Adalwolf said, "your punishment will fit the crime." He laid his hand on Ben's shoulder and pushed him into the room.

THE LAST NAZI. Copyright © 2003 by Stan Pottinger. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles or reviews. For information, address St. Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10010.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 6, 2010

    Not To Be Put Down

    A great read with many twists and turns. It has you guessing what will happen next. The first Pottinger book I have read and I plan to read his other books. This story would make a great movie with the audience at the edge of their seats.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2003

    Suspense Fell Short

    OK, with all the positive reviews I read, I thought this book would be a true nail-biter. It wasn¿t. Though not always predictable, it was one of those annoying stories that paints the FBI as bumbling idiots. Melissa, our heroine, is made to look like the head buffoon. OK, so I'm Melissa and I have a mad Nazi chasing me who has created a deadly plague. Do I go into hiding? Do I have police watching me 24 hours a day? Do I have security alarms and/or cameras set up in my house? Do I even bother to keep my cell phone charged? NO. I personally am more cautious in my every day life than Melissa is with some psycho chasing after her. It drove me insane. Sorry, I just found her character too unbelievable. I doubt she could find her car keys, never-mind an illusive Nazi who¿s been hiding for nearly 58 years. Either I¿m getting too jaded in my reading or good thrillers are not what they used to be.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2003

    Whew! What a Book

    Many a book of fiction has been written about WWII. Some great, some not so great, some repetitive and mediocre. Put this clever novel at the top of the heap. Great story line and will keep you spell bound. Read it in two nights. I generally ignore dusk cover comments as part of the marketing of the book. Not so, here. Do not want to spoil any of this for you so I have but one suggestion - buy it and enjoy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2003

    AN EPIC READING OF AN EPIC THRILLER

    Just when we thought all fears of Nazi terrors had long been laid to rest 'Adalwolf' appears in our country. His given name is not known. What is known is that he is a genius, and was once the diabolic young protege of the Butcher of Auschwitz, Josef Mengele. The world believed him dead for almost half a century. Yet, he is very much alive and has killed three people. Melissa Gale is an attorney and investigator for the Office of special Investigations, the entity known as 'Nazi Hunters.' She is on the trail of 'Adalwolf,' little knowing that he is stalking her. It is only through Melissa and her personal medical history that this deadly psychopath can create a virus capable of mass destruction. The two readers cast for this epic thriller deserve a hearty high five. Paul Hecht invests his delivery with appropriate menace, and Maggi-Meg Reed is a sterling Melissa.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Exciting thriller

    Though he is a foster son, sixteen years old Adalwolf behaves like a chip off the old block, emulating the worst traits of his mentor research scientist Dr. Josef Mengele. He calms down the young victims undergoing inhuman experiments. When the Nazis lose, everyone assumes that Adalwolf died in the final days.<P> Almost six decades later, agents of the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations accompany a SWAT team trying to capture the evil but brilliant Adalwolf. Among the squad of ¿Nazi Hunters is attorney Melissa Gale, who has hunted the butcher for several years while having trying to have a baby with her journalist husband. However, she is soon going to learn how diabolical her foe is as he has developed a virus that will wipe out the entire global Jewish population with Melissa as his carrier.<P> This is a taut thriller that may turn out to be the year¿s best with its brilliantly developed story line that cleverly spins into an incredible moral dilemma. From the beginning to the end Adalwolf proves to be one of the more infamous villains in a long time. His final solution is frightening yet seems plausible because the creation of designer viruses is a potential by-product of the genome mapping. Fans who read THE LAST NAZI will not make this the last Stanley Pottinger novel they ever read as he raises the thriller bar to unbelievable heights.<P> Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)