Last Night
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Last Night

by Hyewon Yum
     
 

A little girl doesn't like her dinner and is sent to her room. She seeks comfort from her friend Bear and falls asleep. So begins a fantastic dream voyage deep into the forest, where the girl and her friend dance and play all night. And in the morning, mother and child make up.

With brilliant linocut illustrations and not a single word to break the spell, this

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Overview

A little girl doesn't like her dinner and is sent to her room. She seeks comfort from her friend Bear and falls asleep. So begins a fantastic dream voyage deep into the forest, where the girl and her friend dance and play all night. And in the morning, mother and child make up.

With brilliant linocut illustrations and not a single word to break the spell, this picture book marks an impressive American debut for Hyewon Yum.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“This wordless story is a very clever re-visitation of the landscape of Where the Wild Things Are.” —The Chicago Tribune

“Yum has made this book distinct with her art, which manages to be charming and eerie at the same time.” —The Oklahoman

“With so much depth and emotion, the art makes words superfluous. Their absence gives kids room to think.” —Starred, Booklist

“This is a great book for children not quite able to read, but eager to pick up a book.” —Sacramento Book Review

“In stunning linoleum block prints, debut artist Yum imagines a little girl who dreams of a night in the forest with her teddy bear . . . Some picture books are written for children; this one gives a sense of what it's like to be one.” —Starred, Publishers Weekly

“Many adults will view this book as a useful tool to encourage children to explore and cope effectively with feelings of anger as they compose their own explanations for the series of events so vividly represented in this eloquent book.” —School Library Journal

“Linocut illustrations, done in a muted palette and printed with a grainy texture, have a raw quality; each image captures a narrative beat.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The technique used, employing several blocks of different color combinations for each illustration, requires much planning and time-consuming execution, yet the result looks spontaneous and intimate.” —The Horn Book

Publishers Weekly

In stunning linoleum block prints, debut artist Yum imagines a little girl who dreams of a night in the forest with her teddy bear. Pleasure and anxiety intertwine through the wordless spreads; the prints are like a diary in which Yum records everything the girl feels. Rough-cut figures are backlit with eerie pinks and yellows. Full-bleed spreads give the sense that there's nowhere to hide. Hunched in a corner, addressed by a mother represented only by her looming shadow, the girl is sent to bed for not finishing her dinner. As she sleeps, her teddy bear grows huge and awakens her. After a moment's doubt, she follows him into the woods, where, in a series of joyful double-page spreads, they cavort with two foxes, and the bear feasts on fish. Soon, though, the girl longs for home. An owl startles her in the dark. Instead of cuddling up to her furry companion, she lies awake in the forest until morning finds her back in her bed and eager for a hug from her mother. Some picture books are written for children; this one gives a sense of what it's like to be one. Ages 3-6. (Oct.)

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Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
In a tale reminiscent of Where the Wild Things Are, a young girl refuses to eat her dinner and is sent to bed. No words are needed to follow the story across the double pages. She cuddles her teddy bear and falls asleep. The bear grows to life size, taking her away with him into the magical moonlit night. There they meet and dance with animals, catch fish, enjoy a fire, fall asleep. When she wakes up the next morning, bear is back to normal size. It is time to smile with a reassuring hug from mother. Linocuts create areas of color that emphasize shape and texture rather than line. The girl's hair is a single helmet-like black shape, her dress a bright red. The bear is a very bulky dark brown with white touches for features. The trees and other animals are similarly formed. There are textures throughout the book that add liveliness to the shapes and tend to unify the various parts of each scene. Images only suggest the specifics of the story, encouraging the reader to personalize the adventure; the final scene delivers a satisfactory comfortable solution to any variation. Readers should check out the difference between the front and back end pages and the contrast between the jacket and the cover. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3

In this wordless picture book, an unhappy child sits at a table holding a fork over a plate of food. She obviously isn't excited about her supper and is sent to her room. After she goes to sleep, her stuffed bear awakens her and takes her on a walk. They meet up with some wild animals and play until finally the bear falls asleep and the girl lies down close to him. The next morning, she looks at her stuffed bear still sprawled on his back, and then walks downstairs and hugs her mom. Yum's evocative linocut illustrations offer ample context for a child to imagine what the little girl is feeling, and how her mood changes over the course of the night. White, pink, and yellow tones blend and contrast in her face to sometimes resemble a mask. Not all children will fully appreciate the indistinct look of the pictures; however, their sweet poignancy is palpable. Many adults will view this book as a useful tool to encourage children to explore and cope effectively with feelings of anger as they compose their own explanations for the series of events so vividly represented in this eloquent book.-Kirsten Cutler, Sonoma County Library, CA

Kirkus Reviews

In this intimate wordless volume, a naughty little girl is sent to her room and soon falls fast asleep. As she slumbers, her teddy bear grows to life-size, and when she wakes he beckons her out into the moonlit night. Together, they frolic with a lion and foxes, but as the animals grow more raucous, the girl becomes emotionally removed. Showing signs of remorse, she huddles away from the bear. In the morning, the young protagonist finds herself—and her toy bear—safe in her own room. Down the stairs and into her mother's arms, she is happy and content at last. Both plot and the main character's emotional arc are in direct parallel to Where the Wild Things Are, but where Sendak's beloved book captured the exuberance of the 1960s, Yum's interpretation is more sober. Her linocut illustrations, done in a muted palette and printed with a grainy texture, have a raw quality; each image captures a narrative beat. With its striking compositions and hauntingly lovely endpapers, Yum's work is a somber reworking of a classic. (Picture book. 5-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374343583
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
09/30/2008
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

HYEWON YUM was born in South Korea and studied painting and printmaking at Seoul National University. She received her master of fine arts at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, and presently lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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