Last of the great scouts (Buffalo Bill)

Last of the great scouts (Buffalo Bill)

3.7 7
by Helen Cody Wetmore
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
)LAST OF THE GREAT SCOUTS CHAPTER I THE OLD HOMESTEAD IN IOWA A PLEASANT, roomy farm-house, set in the sunlight against a background of cool, green wood and mottled…  See more details below

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
)LAST OF THE GREAT SCOUTS CHAPTER I THE OLD HOMESTEAD IN IOWA A PLEASANT, roomy farm-house, set in the sunlight against a background of cool, green wood and mottled meadow—this is the picture that my earliest memories frame for me. To this home my parents, Isaac and Mary Cody, had moved soon after'their marriage. The place was known as the Scott farm, and was situated in Scott County, Iowa, near the historic little town of Le Clair, where, but a few years before, a village of the Fox Indians had been located; where Black Hawk and his thousand warriors had assembled for their last war-dance; where the marquee of General Scott was erected, and the treaty with the Sacs and Foxes drawn up; and where, in obedience to the Sac chief's terms, Antoine Le Clair, the famous half-breed Indian scholar and interpreter, had built his cabin, and given to the place his name. Here, in this atmosphere of pioneer struggle and Indian warfare—in the farm-house in the dancing sunshine, with the background of wood and meadow—my brother, William Frederick Cody, was born, on the 26th day of February, 1846. Of the good, old-fashioned sort was our family, numbering five daughters and two sons—Martha, Samuel, Julia, William, Eliza, Helen, and May. Samuel, a lad of unusual beauty of face and nature, was killed through an unhappy accident before he was yet fourteen. He was riding "Betsy Baker," a mare well known among old settlers in Iowa as one of speed and pedigree, yet displaying at times a most malevolent temper, accompanied by Will, who, though only seven years of age, yet sat his pony with the ease and grace that distinguished the veteran rider of the future. Presently Betsy Baker became fractious and sought to throw her rider. In vain did she rear and plunge; he kept his saddle. Then, s...

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940018757528
Publisher:
New York, Grosset & Dunlap
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
522 KB

Read an Excerpt


)LAST OF THE GREAT SCOUTS CHAPTER I THE OLD HOMESTEAD IN IOWA A PLEASANT, roomy farm-house, set in the sunlight against a background of cool, green wood and mottled meadow this is the picture that my earliest memories frame for me. To this home my parents, Isaac and Mary Cody, had moved soon after'their marriage. The place was known as the Scott farm, and was situated in Scott County, Iowa, near the historic little town of Le Clair, where, but a few years before, a village of the Fox Indians had been located; where Black Hawk and his thousand warriors had assembled for their last war-dance; where the marquee of General Scott was erected, and the treaty with the Sacs and Foxes drawn up; and where, in obedience to the Sac chief's terms, Antoine Le Clair, the famous half-breed Indian scholar and interpreter, had built his cabin, and given to the place his name. Here, in this atmosphere of pioneer struggle and Indian warfare in the farm-house in the dancing sunshine, with the background of wood and meadow my brother, William Frederick Cody, was born, on the 26th day of February, 1846. Of the good, old-fashioned sort was our family, numbering five daughters and two sons Martha, Samuel, Julia, William, Eliza, Helen, and May. Samuel, a lad of unusual beauty of face and nature, was killed through an unhappy accident before he was yet fourteen. He was riding "Betsy Baker," a mare well known among old settlers in Iowa as one of speed and pedigree, yet displaying at times a most malevolent temper, accompanied by Will, who, though only seven years of age, yet sat his pony with the ease and grace that distinguished the veteran rider of the future. Presently Betsy Baker became fractious andsought to throw her rider. In vain did she rear and plunge; he kept his saddle. Then, s...

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Last Of The Great Scouts 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
knightoftheforrest More than 1 year ago
A great read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago