The Last of the Mohicans

( 340 )

Overview

A massacre at a colonial garrison, the kidnapping of two pioneer sisters by Iroquois tribesmen, the treachery of a renegade brave, and the ambush of innocent settlers create an unforgettable picture of American frontier life in this imaginative, innovative, and classic eighteenth-century adventure--the most popular of James Fenimore Cooper's Leatherstocking Tales.
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The Last of the Mohicans

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Overview

A massacre at a colonial garrison, the kidnapping of two pioneer sisters by Iroquois tribesmen, the treachery of a renegade brave, and the ambush of innocent settlers create an unforgettable picture of American frontier life in this imaginative, innovative, and classic eighteenth-century adventure--the most popular of James Fenimore Cooper's Leatherstocking Tales.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"[Cooper's] sympathy is large, and his humor is as genuine—and as perfectly unaffected—as his art."— Joseph Conrad
Leon Jackson University of South Carolina
"James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans presents a double challenge to today's readers; a work of historical fiction, it has become, in itself, a historical artifact in need of explication. Paul Gutjahr's elegant introduction and judicious choice of secondary sources help to place Cooper's novel in its historical moment, while at the same time clarifying the novel's own engagements with American history. Accentuating Cooper's engagement with issues of race, gender, and hemispheric conflict, Gutjahr's edition reminds us of why Cooper's novel remains timely and even urgent. It will be the edition of choice for scholars, students, and casual readers alike."
David J. Carlson California State University
"Paul Gutjahr's edition of The Last of the Mohicans is a model text, ideally suited for the classroom or the general reader. The decision to print the novel in its original two-volume format foregrounds Cooper's careful structuring of the book. Gutjahr's informative introduction effectively explores the novel's formal structure and its engagements with colonial and antebellum American history. The contextual materials included are also well-chosen. Including excerpts of Cooper's ethnographic source material in the edition is extremely helpful, as this will aid readers in developing a deeper understanding of the novel's representations of colonial history. This is certainly an edition I will use and recommend."
PopMatters - Kerrie Mills
Nearly 200 years on, the tale of The Last of the Mohicans is still a part of the American consciousness.
PopMatters

Nearly 200 years on, the tale of The Last of the Mohicans is still a part of the American consciousness.
— Kerrie Mills

Children's Literature - Elizabeth Fronk
Set in colonial America during the French and Indian Wars, this story follows Alice Munro, Cora Munro, and Duncan Heyward as they travel with Magua to Fort William Henry. Along the way, they join a group of Mohicans named Uncas, Chingachgook, and Hawkeye. Due to the ongoing war between British and French, it is difficult to know who is a friend or who is an enemy. However, it soon becomes apparent that Magua is not to be trusted and intends to kidnap Heyward and the Munros. Cora learns that Magua wants to exact revenge on her father, and she offers herself to Magua; fortunately, the Mohicans come to their rescue. The women and Heyward are rescued, but they must hasten to the fort. When they arrive, Colonel Munro realizes that he cannot get reinforcements and must surrender to the French. Then, Huron Indians attack, and Magua is able to capture Cora. Cooper’s classic story has an exotic setting, adventure, and romance. It also has some unique observations about class and race. However, the stilted writing makes it difficult to follow. Also, the lush illustrations do not correspond to the page on which they appear; this might add to readers’ confusion. High school readers (or those wanting to compare this with the 1992 movie) might read this, especially given its handsome presentation. However, the book’s cost and the availability of other, free versions might still discourage examination of this rendition. Reviewer: Elizabeth Fronk; Ages 12 up.
From Barnes & Noble
Recounting the story of the bloody conflict between the British and the French on the early North American frontier, this classic narrative was written in 1826 by the man who is today considered our first great American novelist.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679847069
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 5/28/1993
  • Series: A Stepping Stone Book(TM) Series
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 352,078
  • Age range: 6 - 9 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.19 (w) x 7.61 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

James Fenimore Cooper

James Fenimore Cooper was the great professional American author. He was born on Septenber 15, 1789, in Burlington, New Jersey, and grew up in the frontier village of Cooperstown, New Yorrk, in the heart of the wilderness he was to immortalize in his frontier novels. A high-spirited youth, he was expelled from Yale because of a prank and was finally signed by the navy by his strong-willed father. In 1819 a trfling incident repordatly led to the writing of his first book. Reading aloud to his wife from a populr English novel, he exclaimed, “I could write you a better book myself!” The result was Precausion (1820), which followed in 1821 by his first real success, The Spy.

Cooper became a prolific writer, creating two unique genres that were to become staples in American literature–the sea romance and the frontier adventure story. The first of the famous Leatherstocking tales, The Pioneers, appeared in 1823 and introduced the wilderness scout Natty Bumppo. This detailed portrait of frontier life has been called the first truly American novel. In The Last of the Mohicans (1826) Natty Bumppo becomes the well-loved Hawkeye befriended by the noble Indian Chingachgook; the novel remains a favorite American classic. Other Leatherstocking tales were The Prairie (1827), The Pathfinder (1840) influenced both Herman Melville and Joseph Conrad and led to the use of the sea novel as vehicle for spiritual and moral explorations. Cooper also wrote political satire, romance, and the meticulously researched History of the Navy of the United States of America (1839). By the time of his death on September 14, 1851, he was considered America’s “national novelist.”

Biography

James Cooper (he added the Fenimore when he was in his 30s) was born September 15, 1789, in Burlington, New Jersey, to William Cooper and Elizabeth Fenimore Cooper. In 1790 the family moved to the frontier country of upstate New York, where William established a village he called Cooperstown. Although cushioned by wealth and William's status as landlord and judge, the Coopers found pioneering to be rugged, and only 7 of the 13 Cooper children survived their early years. All the hardship notwithstanding, according to family reports, the young James loved the wilderness. Years later, he wrote The Pioneers (1823) about Cooperstown in the 1790s, but many of his other books draw deeply on his childhood experiences of the frontier as well.

Cooper was sent to Yale in 1801 but he was expelled in 1805 for setting off an explosion in another student's room. Afterward, as a midshipman in the fledgling U.S. Navy, he made Atlantic passages and served at an isolated post on Lake Ontario. Cooper resigned his commission in 1811 to marry Susan Augusta De Lancey, the daughter of a wealthy New York State family. During the next decade, however, a series of bad investments and legal entanglements reduced his inheritance to the verge of bankruptcy.

Cooper was already 30 years old when, on a dare from his wife, he became a writer. One evening he threw down, in disgust, a novel he was reading aloud to her, saying he could write a better book himself. Susan, who knew that he disliked writing even letters, expressed her doubts. To prove her wrong he wrote Precaution, which was published anonymously in 1820. Encouraged by favorable reviews, Cooper wrote other books in quick succession, and by the time The Last of the Mohicans, his sixth novel, was published in 1827, he was internationally famous as America's first professionally successful novelist. Eventually he published 32 novels, as well as travel books and histories. Cooper invented the genre of nautical fiction, and in the figure of Nathaniel or "Natty" Bumppo (Hawkeye in The Last of the Mohicans) -- the central character in the five Leatherstocking Tales Cooper published between 1823 and 1841 -- he gave American fiction its first great hero.

Shortly after publishing The Last of the Mohicans, Cooper moved his family to Europe, but in 1833 he returned to America, moving back into his father's restored Mansion House in Cooperstown. He died there on September 14, 1851.

Author biography courtesy of Barnes & Noble Books.

Good To Know

Cooper was expelled from Yale due to his passion for pranks, which included training a donkey to sit in a professor's chair and setting a fellow student's room on fire.

Between 1822 and 1826 Cooper lived in New York City, and was a major player on its intellectual scene. He founded the Bread and Cheese Club, which had many high-profile members, including notable painters of the Hudson River School and writers like William Cullen Bryant.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      September 15, 1789
    2. Place of Birth:
      Burlington, New Jersey
    1. Date of Death:
      September 14, 1851
    2. Place of Death:
      Cooperstown, New York
    1. Education:
      Yale University (expelled in 1805)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter I

Mine ear is open, and my heart prepared; The worst is worldly loss thou canst unfold:— Say, is my kingdom lost? Richard II, III.ii. 93–95.

It was a feature peculiar to the colonial wars of North America, that the toils and dangers of the wilderness were to be encountered, before the adverse hosts could meet. A wide, and, apparently, an impervious boundary of forests, severed the possessions of the hostile provinces of France and England. The hardy colonist, and the trained European who fought at his side, frequently expended months in struggling against the rapids of the streams, or in effecting the rugged passes of the mountains, in quest of an opportunity to exhibit their courage in a more martial conflict. But, emulating the patience and self-denial of the practised native warriors, they learned to overcome every difficulty; and it would seem, that in time, there was no recess of the woods so dark, nor any secret place so lovely, that it might claim exemption from the inroads of those who had pledged their blood to satiate their vengeance, or to uphold the cold and selfish policy of the distant monarchs of Europe.

Perhaps no district, throughout the wide extent of the intermediate frontiers, can furnish a livelier picture of the cruelty and fierceness of the savage warfare of those periods, than the country which lies between the head waters of the Hudson and the adjacent lakes.

The facilities which nature had there offered to the march of the combatants, were too obvious to be neglected. The lengthened sheet of the Champlain stretched from the frontiers of Canada, deep within the borders of the neighbouring province of New-York, forming a natural passage across half the distance that the French were compelled to master in order to strike their enemies. Near its southern termination, it received the contributions of another lake, whose waters were so limpid, as to have been exclusively selected by the Jesuit missionaries, to perform the typical purification of baptism, and to obtain for it the title of the lake “du Saint Sacrement.” The less zealous English thought they conferred a sufficient honour on its unsullied fountains, when they bestowed the name of their reigning prince, the second of the House of Hanover. The two united to rob the untutored possessors of its wooded scenery of their native right to perpetuate its original appellation of “Horican.”*

Winding its way among countless islands, and imbedded in mountains, the “holy lake” extended a dozen leagues still farther to the south. With the high plain that there interposed itself to the further passage of the water, commenced a portage of as many miles, which conducted the adventurer to the banks of the Hudson, at a point, where, with the usual obstructions of the rapids, or rifts, as they were then termed in the language of the country, the river became navigable to the tide.

While, in the pursuit of their daring plans of annoyance, the restless enterprise of the French even attempted the distant and difficult gorges of the Alleghany, it may easily be imagined that their proverbial acuteness would not overlook the natural advantages of the district we have just described. It became, emphatically, the bloody arena, in which most of the battles for the mastery of the colonies were contested. Forts were erected at the different points that commanded the facilities of the route, and were taken and retaken, rased and rebuilt, as victory alighted on the hostile banners. While the husbandmen shrunk back from the dangerous passes, within the safer boundaries of the more ancient settlements, armies larger than those that had often disposed of the sceptres of the mother countries, were seen to bury themselves in these forests, whence they rarely returned but in skeleton bands, that were haggard with care, or dejected by defeat. Though the arts of peace were unknown to this fatal region, its forests were alive with men; its glades and glens rang with the sounds of martial music, and the echoes of its mountains threw back the laugh, or repeated the wanton cry, of many a gallant and reckless youth, as he hurried by them, in the noontide of his spirits, to slumber in a long night of forgetfulness.

* As each nation of the Indians had either its language or its dialect, they usually gave different names to the same places, though nearly all of their appellations were descriptive of the object. Thus, a literal translation of the name of this beautiful sheet of water, used by the tribe that dwelt on its banks, would be “The tail of the Lake.” Lake George, as it is vulgarly, and now indeed legally, called, forms a sort of tail to Lake Champlain, when viewed on the map. Hence the name. [1831]

It was in this scene of strife and bloodshed, that the incidents we shall attempt to relate occurred, during the third year of the war which England and France last waged, for the possession of a country, that neither was destined to retain.

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Table of Contents

Maps (Figures A-C)
Introduction
James Fenimore Cooper: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text
Figure D: Title Page of Volume I of The Last of the Mohicans
Prefaces (1826, 1831, 1850)
The Last of the Mohicans, Volume I
Figure E: Title Page of Volume II of The Last of the Mohicans
The Last of the Mohicans, Volume II
Appendix A: Illustrations (Figures F-J)
Appendix B: Cooper's Historical Sources
1. History, Manners and Customs of the Indian Nations by Rev. John Heckewelder (1819)
2. Travels Through the Interior Parts of North America, Third London Edition by J. Carver (1781)
3. Remarks, Made on a Short Tour Between Hartford and Quebec by Benjamin Silliman (1820)
Appendix C: Recollections and Appraisals of Cooper
1. Anonymous review of The Last of the Mohicans in the United States Literary Gazette (1826)
2. Anonymous review in Literary Gazette and Journal of the Belles Lettres, London (1826)
3. Review of The Last of the Mohicans in the North American Review by W. H. Gardiner (1826)
4. "Discourse on the Life, Genius and Writings of J. Fenimore Cooper" by William Cullen Bryant (1852)
5. Susan Fenimore Cooper on The Last of the Mohicans (1861)
6. "Fenimore Cooper's Further Literary Offenses" by Mark Twain (around 1895)
Appendix D: Historical Context - The Cherokee Removal
1. Indian Removal Act of the United States Congress (1830)
2. Andrew Jackson’s Second State of the Union Address (1830)
Select Bibliography
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Reading Group Guide

1. How do Cooper's characters, specifically Natty Bumppo and the Indian Magua, test the boundary between Indian and white cultures? What happens to these characters? How does the metaphorical racial boundary extend to that between wilderness and cultivated land, if at all?

2. What are the differences Cooper outlines between the Mohicans and the Delawares, and to what end? What role does Uncas play in the conflict between the two tribes? What is the significance of his relationship with Cora?

3. How does Natty Bumppo's view of society oppose Munro's, particularly at the novel's conclusion? How do Natty's views support or contradict his own existence, straddling two worlds as he does? How does this deep-rooted ambivalence about social and racial hierarchy inform the novel?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 340 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(127)

4 Star

(87)

3 Star

(51)

2 Star

(33)

1 Star

(42)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 341 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2006

    Wonderful

    I read a chapter, and almost put it back on the shelf. But if you can make past the first two chapters, you won't be disappointed. After the slow beginning, the pace never slackens, and the characters and plot are engaging and lively.

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2006

    You Won't Be Disappointed

    This by far is a great book. The first chapter is a bit hard to understand, but it grows from there to become a novel of suspense. I highly recommend this book for those who like a book that will keep you on the edge of your seat.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2003

    would you like some stone soup?

    The Last of the Mohicans was an interesting and very detailed portrayal of a small group in the middle of the French and Indian War. I liked it a lot and would like to read more of James Fenimore Cooper¿s novels sometime. I know that many people enjoyed the movie, but to get the whole picture, you really need to read the book. The movie is great, I agree, but I just liked to book better (then again, when is it that you ever like a movie more than the book?). Though not my favourite classic, it is still an amazing book, very worthy of anyone¿s reading time.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2004

    Historically Enchanting!

    James Fenimore Cooper's novel, The last of the Mohincans, tells the story of the colonial scout Hawkeye, real name Natty Bumppo, with his 2 Indian companions Changachgook (his Mohican father) and his mohican brother Uncas. They stumble onto a party of British soldiers conducting 2 fair maidens (names Alice and Cora) traveling to their father Colonel Munro, who is the commander of the British Fort William Henry during the French and Indian War. They are being treacherously lead by a huron scout Magua who intends to hurt the 2 girls in order to get to their father the Colonel. I thought that The Last of the Mohicans was a very interesting piece of work. The book has a compelling story and great characters. Any one that is interested in historical fiction should read this book. The aouther tells this story in chronological order and in third person. He was very descriptive and precise in writing this novel. It is filled with action and adventure. It has a heart felt story with a sad, but meaningful conclusion that is poignant and well thought out. It gives you a sence of guilt to anyone that is from a British/ French heritage. It makes you realize what is the real goal of English or French society, putting risk on lives and ancient cultural heritage of the Native American people? Or have a few extra acres of land? I think that anyone who loves reading and have a plot that makes their mind work a little, would have the privelege of reading this book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I almost don't know what to make of this story. At times I hate

    I almost don't know what to make of this story. At times I hated it but then there are other sections that I really loved. I enjoyed the character of Cora Munro and wish she said and did more in the book. I thought Cooper used way too much description when writing his scenes, and it distracted from the storyline. There are a lot of sections where he could have said the same thing in about half the time. The verbal assault he puts the reader through is annoying and it takes away from the actual plot. After reading the book I decided to watch the 1992 movie version, which surprisingly I enjoyed much more than the book. The movie isn't anything like the book, it has the same characters and the same overall plot, but other than that the movie has a totally different tone than the book did, and I think that's what appealed to my 21st Century brain. I'd recommend only if you want to broaden your knowledge of early American novelists and see just where American literature came from. If you're looking for pure entertainment, just watch the movie with Daniel Day Lewis.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    This is the childrens edition

    Its abridged and its not the adult version. This one was made for kids to read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

    Abridged and overly translated for children

    I'm embarrassed to admit I didn't check if it was simplified first. This probably would be great for kids but I lost my paperback copy and having names like le subtil translated to sly fox in this version seems hokey.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2013

    darn

    could not read becasue of typos

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2013

    Ink

    "Yes, Bri. But l'm mourning more cuz my own ster trie to bury Rinzler!"

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2013

    Mike tl melkor

    If he touches my daughter i am going to be really pis<_> sed if he touches anyine else in my family i will have to talk to

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2013

    To ink and sam

    Sam: oooh how friendly? To ink: *faints* omg

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2013

    A NOTE LAYS ON THE KITCHEN TABLE AND READS...

    I don't think i belong here anymore, i've only made things worse here. I've devastated my family, both my sister's hate me, my current bf hates me and yet i feel i'm never going to be enough. Hopefully this will be my last post here, for i have quit rping. Occassionaly you may see me at Scarlet Letter but i assure you that is it. Three days before my birthday i have screwed up my life majorly. I don't kbow wha to do anymore but to say my goodbye's. Leah, you were my mother, a friend, and family. You helped me out when i was clueless and i will never be able to repay you for that. You showed me what i can do to make myself happy and learned how to make other people happy around me. Take care! Roan, you were my stepfather, my daddy. I loved you too, but i didn't really know you so i can't say a bunch. Mike, you were my true father. You cared when other people didn't and you were the leader of my family. I found you at scarlet letter and wouldn't let go of your leg, and that's when you found Leah. I was the first chid of this family and hopefully the first to officially quit. Ink, you were my sister and you were there when i needed to spill out my heart. I aprreciated everyhing till i found out you hated me. I didn't know why and i still don't know why. But take care of my family. Love ya... Briana, take care of Sam. September, you were my first sister. The one i cared for the most. You tought me porno was not the best of things, ad since then i have quit love you and take care. Sam, you were my human and my brother-in-law. Wolfie won't be here unless i'm at Scarlet Letter. Bye.... illusion, i seem to feel i have done nothing but wrong in your life and seem like i'm making your life a living hell. I'm sorry for liking you, for making you apart of my family when you didn't want to. Take care of your Daughter and have a wonderfull life without me. Bella, you are my daughter and you know where to find me. If you need anything just go to our book. Everybody else, surely nobody else even cared to read down to here and i'm just asting your time. Live a strong and healthy life and live to your fullest. Most of you will be happy i'm finaly out of your lifes and others want me to stay till the end of time. But everytime i try to make things better it makes things worse. This is my last post at this house, my finally day at Scarlet Letter is on Wednesday, march 27th, my Birthday. Farewell and have a wonderfull exsistance without me.~Crystal

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2013

    Crysgal

    O.o Ooooohkaaaay. Gtgtb. Night.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2013

    Briana

    DADDY!!! *huggles*

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2013

    September to crystal

    Walks up the staurs and opens your door. Hey....cute baby.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    Uon

    "Nothing."

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    Briana

    What do ya wanna have? More doritos?grilled cheese?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2013

    Leah

    Hey

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2013

    Fvbcgcvbvbvbvvnghfhfggvbhvbvbvbbvvbbbbvbvbvbvvvvbbb

    M bvhvfjgyghffjfjccncncnnnvn b njbvhheeweediddeeeesdddjjjjdddjjjjdedjddjjdj?M?MMMMMM?MMMMM??MMMM?MMMMMMMMEEEEESKKIMDDJJJJDJDDJDJJJJJJDKDJUFJJJJDJJDJDJJJMMDJJJJJKJNXDJDDNDJESQQQJJJJJJJDBBB CXHCHBNNNNNNNCNXJNNNNNCCBNNCFNNNNDDNNNJNNNXMMMMM??MMMMMMHHJNNNMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMNMNMN?MMMMMMMMMM?MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM?MMMMMNKNKNKMMMMMJMMMMMJJJJJJJJJJNMNJJJFBghvbvhvbvbnvb nj vb bnvvnvbbvbvb bvbvb b bbbbv bhvv bbhvg b bvbgjvjvhbcj nnbn cvbvvvbvbcvvb bv jbnkk@mjgggghhimnnjnnnnnnnjjjjjnnnnkvvnvn

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Excellent read. Easy to read and Navigate on the nook. I will b

    Excellent read. Easy to read and Navigate on the nook. I will buy the rest of the series from this publisher.

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