Last Rights

Last Rights

by Grady Klein
     
 

Birdy thought she knew her family and friends.

She was wrong.

Birdy’s grandfather is dead — shot by her childhood nanny, Patricia. Her father is bent on bringing Patricia to justice: her mother’s having an affair with the minister who has come to bury Birdy’s grandfather: her best friend Louis is an escaped slave: and the

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Overview

Birdy thought she knew her family and friends.

She was wrong.

Birdy’s grandfather is dead — shot by her childhood nanny, Patricia. Her father is bent on bringing Patricia to justice: her mother’s having an affair with the minister who has come to bury Birdy’s grandfather: her best friend Louis is an escaped slave: and the local doctor’s mind has clearly jumped the tracks somewhere along the way.

Who can Birdy turn to for help with her grief and confusion? Who can she trust?

The latest volume in this brightly colored, thought-provoking series brings new challenges and intrigues to The Lost Colony as everyone’s secrets begin to unravel and nothing is quite what it had seemed.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Klein continues his masterful political fantasy The Lost Colony by turning the spotlight on frontier religion’s exploitative powers. Protagonist Bird, a rambunctious child who is doted on by many former slaves, surviving Indians, and the Chinese immigrant scientist Dr. Wong, has a terrible time this outing. She is coping with sad memories of her deceased grandfather, struggling to make sense of the newly arrived, insipid, and dangerous preacher Buck Swagger; and fighting with her true friend, Louis. As ever, the Lost Colony’s environment is filled with surface sweetness and light, not to mention magic rock-bones, cute bugs, and sassy nineteenth-century costumes setting off big hair and soulful eyes. Readers who enjoy political satire will find this a treat, while graphic novel aficionados who have waited a year for this episode will be delighted to find it continues to pack unexpected punches. Newcomers to the series will want to begin with volume one, The Snodgrass Conspiracy (2006), to get a grip on Bird’s world. — Booklist

Like some fairy tale take on the Old South, peopled with fantastic characters and lightly leavened with satire, Klein’s third Lost Colony volume is a treat from start to finish. On the titular utopian island, where verdant fields are bounded by lushly blooming trees and picturesque mountains that initially obscure the dark past of the humans living there, spoiled princess Birdy isn’t sure where to turn with her problems. The loving flashbacks she has of her recently murdered grandfather are challenged by the eruption of truth about his violently racist character, while her stuckup mother appears smitten by the appearance of an old flame, the oleaginous Reverend Swagger. Meanwhile, Birdy, a spoiled and repentant tyke, continues to mistreat her one true friend, the ex-slave Louis. Klein’s mixture of the real (shades of the antebellum Southern racism) and the fantastic (magical rock sprites who inhabit the island and work in mysterious ways), combined with his wondrously bright visuals, make for a heady and occasionally even educational mixture. — Publisher's Weekly

In this third installment of a planned ten-book series, Birdy Snodgrass’s life is clearly getting more complicated. The “lost” island’s location has been betrayed by her own mother, who sends a letter to Buck Swagger, her former lover and minister of dubious repute. Meanwhile Birdy is trying to come to grips with the death of her grandfather. Was he truly killed by her former nanny, Patricia, or the rock bugs that seem intent on protecting the island? As she struggles with questions of whom can she trust, what happens when people die, and what Dr. Wong is truly trying to do in his island laboratory, Birdy’s father sends guards to capture both Patricia and Louis John, much to Birdy’s dismay and confusion.

Unquestionably there is a lot going on in this series. Coming in to the third volume without familiarity with the first two is inadvisable. Klein’s artwork is clever and has depth, while his ongoing tale provides another look at issues of American history, slavery, religion, politics, and corruption. Besides reading it on its own, it would be an interesting series to pair with Twain’s look at early America or to bring into an AP American History class. Libraries that have started purchasing this series certainly need to satisfy their readers curiosity as to how the travails of how Birdy are evolving. — VOYA

Publishers Weekly

Like some fairy tale take on the Old South, peopled with fantastic characters and lightly leavened with satire, Klein's third Lost Colony volume is a treat from start to finish. On the titular utopian island, where verdant fields are bounded by lushly blooming trees and picturesque mountains that initially obscure the dark past of the humans living there, spoiled princess Birdy isn't sure where to turn with her problems. The loving flashbacks she has of her recently murdered grandfather are challenged by eruptions of truth about his violently racist character, while her stuckup mother appears smitten by the appearance of an old flame, the oleaginous Reverend Swagger. Meanwhile, Birdy, a spoiled and tempestuous tyke, continues to mistreat her one true friend, the ex-slave Louis. Klein's mixture of the real (shades of antebellum Southern racism) and the fantastic (magical rock sprites who inhabit the island and work in mysterious ways), combined with his wondrously bright visuals, make for a heady and occasionally even educational mixture. (Oct.)

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VOYA - Mary Ann Darby
In this third installment of a planned ten-book series, Birdy Snodgrass's life is clearly getting more complicated. The "lost" island's location has been betrayed by her own mother who sends a letter to Buck Swagger, her former lover and possibly Birdy's father, and a minister of dubious repute. Meanwhile Birdy is trying to come to grips with the death of her grandfather. Was he truly killed by her former nanny, Patricia, or the rock bugs that seem intent on protecting the island? As she struggles with questions of whom she can trust, what happens when people die, and what Dr. Wong is truly trying to do in his island laboratory, Birdy's father sends guards to capture both Patricia and Louis John, much to Birdy's dismay and confusion. Unquestionably there is a lot going on in this series. Coming in to the third volume without familiarity with the first two is inadvisable. Klein's artwork is clever and has depth, while his ongoing tale provides another look at issues of American history, slavery, religion, politics, and corruption. Besides reading it on its own, it would be an interesting series to pair with Twain's look at early America or to bring into an AP American History class. Libraries that have started purchasing this series certainly need to satisfy their readers' curiosity as to how the travails of Birdy are evolving. Reviewer: Mary Ann Darby
Kirkus Reviews
An absurdly whimsical graphic novel devised with more style than substance. The inhabitants of a mysterious unnamed island emerge once again to prevent strangers from infiltrating and to maintain peace on their clandestine homestead. Young Birdy Snodgrass, still grieving over her grandfather's murder, seeks to find answers. Everyone on the island has a secret, though none prove particularly shocking nor interesting as their past indiscretions come to light. The island shivers with an undercurrent of magic, and its curious rock bugs, little anthropomorphized jumbles of pebbles, may have a connection to the death of Birdy's grandfather. Her father, however, believes that Birdy's former nanny is the assailant and plans to see the woman brought to justice. The island's inhabitants lack direction, and it's hard to relate to this cacophonous mess of patchwork caricatures seemingly running amok. Lacking any cohesion other than some overarching social commentary against racism, Klein's latest does little to enliven a bizarre series. Oddly (though not entirely unpleasantly) stylized with bright hues and blocky characters, it looks-and reads-like nonsensical alternative history devised on an acid trip. Visually engaging, but otherwise an utter mess.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596430990
Publisher:
First Second
Publication date:
09/30/2008
Series:
Lost Colony Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Grady Klein is an award-winning freelance illustrator, designer, and animator. His work has appeared in print and on screen all over the world. THE LOST COLONY 3 is his third book.

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