Last Stop on Market Street

Last Stop on Market Street

4.8 4
by Matt de la Peña, Christian Robinson
     
 

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Winner of the 2016 Newbery Medal
A 2016 Caldecott Honor Book
A 2016 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book

A New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of 2015
A Wall Street Journal Best Children's Book of 2015


Every Sunday after church, CJ and his grandma ride the bus across town. But today, CJ

Overview

Winner of the 2016 Newbery Medal
A 2016 Caldecott Honor Book
A 2016 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book

A New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of 2015
A Wall Street Journal Best Children's Book of 2015


Every Sunday after church, CJ and his grandma ride the bus across town. But today, CJ wonders why they don't own a car like his friend Colby. Why doesn’t he have an iPod like the boys on the bus? How come they always have to get off in the dirty part of town? Each question is met with an encouraging answer from grandma, who helps him see the beauty—and fun—in their routine and the world around them.
 
This energetic ride through a bustling city highlights the wonderful perspective only grandparent and grandchild can share, and comes to life through Matt de la Pena’s vibrant text and Christian Robinson’s radiant illustrations.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Linda Sue Park
Robinson's simple shapes, bright palette and flat perspective belie a sophisticated use of acrylic and collage. His cityscape is diverse and friendly, without neglecting the grittiness: litter, graffiti, security grilles and a soup kitchen—CJ and Nana's destination. With this final detail, Last Stop on Market Street provides a gentle twist, letting readers in on the secret Nana and CJ have known all along: They're on the way to help others who have even less. But it's also the warmth of their intergenerational relationship that will make this book so satisfying, for both young readers and the adults sharing it with them.
Publishers Weekly
★ 10/27/2014
Like still waters, de la Peña (A Nation’s Hope) and Robinson’s (Gaston) story runs deep. It finds beauty in unexpected places, explores the difference between what’s fleeting and what lasts, acknowledges inequality, and testifies to the love shared by an African-American boy and his grandmother. On Sunday, CJ and Nana don’t go home after church like everybody else. Instead, they wait for the Market Street bus. “How come we don’t got a car?” CJ complains. Like many children his age, CJ is caught up in noticing what other people have and don’t have; de la Peña handles these conversations with grace. “Boy, what do we need a car for?” she responds. “We got a bus that breathes fire, and old Mr. Dennis, who always has a trick for you.” (The driver obliges by pulling a coin out of CJ’s ear.) When CJ wishes for a fancy mobile music device like the one that two boys at the back of the bus share, Nana points out a passenger with a guitar. “You got the real live thing sitting across from you.” The man begins to play, and CJ closes his eyes. “He was lost in the sound and the sound gave him the feeling of magic.” When the song’s over, the whole bus applauds, “even the boys in the back.” Nana, readers begin to sense, brings people together wherever she goes. Robinson’s paintings contribute to the story’s embrace of simplicity. His folk-style figures come in a rainbow of shapes and sizes, his urban landscape accented with flying pigeons and the tracery of security gates and fire escapes. At last, CJ and Nana reach their destination—the neighborhood soup kitchen. Nana’s ability to find “beautiful where he never even thought to look” begins to work on CJ as the two spot people they’ve come to know. “I’m glad we came,” he tells her. Earlier, Nana says that life in the deteriorated neighborhood makes people “a better witness for what’s beautiful.” This story has the same effect. Ages 3–5. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (Jan.)
From the Publisher
Praise for LAST STOP ON MARKET STREET:
Winner of the 2016 Newbery Medal
A 2016 Caldecott Honor Book
A 2016 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Book
A New York Times Bestseller
A New York Times Book Review Notable Children’s Book of 2015
An NPR Best Book of 2015

A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2015
A Wall Street Journal Best Book of 2015
A 2015 Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year
A Horn Book Best Book of 2015
BookPage’s “2015’s First Must-Read Picture Book”
The Huffington Post Best Overall Picture Book of 2015
A Boston Globe Best Book of 2015
A Chicago Public Library Best Book of 2015
Chosen for the New York Public Library’s 100 Books for Reading & Sharing List
A Miami Herald Best Children’s Book of 2015
A Raleigh News & Observer Best Children’s Book of 2015
An Atlanta Parent Best Book of 2015
A San Francisco Chronicle Holiday Gift Guide Pick

A Center for the Study of Multicultural Children’s Literature “Best Multicultural Books of 2015” Pick
A Scholastic Instructor 50 Best Summer Book
Chosen for the ALSC 2015 Summer Reading List
A Horn Book Summer 2015 Reading List Pick
Chosen for School Library Journal’s 2015 Top 10 Latin Books List
A Kansas City Star Thanksgiving 2015 Roundup Pick
A Winter 2014-2015 Kids' Indie Next Pick
2015 E.B. White Read Aloud Award Finalist
Nominated for the 2016 Washington Children’s Choice Picture Book Award

Nominated for the 2016 Kentucky Bluegrass Award
Four Starred Reviews!

“It’s also the warmth of their intergenerational relationship that will make this book so satisfying, for both young readers and the adults sharing it with them.”—The New York Times Book Review 

“That material poverty need not mean spiritual or imaginative poverty becomes beautifully clear in the quietly moving pages of ‘Last Stop on Market Street,” a picture book by Matt de la Peña filled with Christian Robinson’s vibrant naïf illustrations.”—The Wall Street Journal

“Matt de la Peña’s warmhearted story is musical in its cadences…Christian Robinson’s angular, bright illustrations are energetic and vibrant... [A] celebration of the joys of service, the gifts of grandmothers and the tenderness that the city can contain.”—The Washington Post

“The sharp illustrations — in bold, and cheerful primaries — get CJ’s restless energy and curious postures exactly right. The voices of CJ and his grandmother carry the story along in subtle point and counterpoint so that at this book’s quiet close you feel like you’ve been listening to a song.”—The Boston Globe

“This celebration of cross-generational bonding is a textual and artistic tour de force.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Like still waters, de la Peña and Robinson’s story runs deep. It finds beauty in unexpected places, explores the difference between what’s fleeting and what lasts, acknowledges inequality, and testifies to the love shared by an African-American boy and his grandmother.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

“De la Peña and Robinson here are carrying on for Ezra Jack Keats in spirit and visual style. This quietly remarkable book will likely inspire questions… it will also have some adult readers reaching for a tissue.”—The Horn Book, starred review

“The urban setting is truly reflective, showing people with different skin colors, body types, abilities, ages, and classes in a natural and authentic manner… A lovely title.”—School Library Journal

“It’s not often that you see class addressed in picture books in ways that are subtle and seamless, but Last Stop on Market Street, the affectionate story of a young boy and his grandmother, does just that…This ode to gratitude is 2015’s first must-read picture book.”—BookPage

“If Robinson doesn't win this year's Caldecott, then next year could be the one with his name on it. His remarkable Last Stop on Market Street (with Matt de la Peña), is an early favorite for the best picture book of 2015.”—Huffington Post Books

“With the precision of a poet, Matt de la Peña chronicles a boy's heartwarming Sunday morning routine with his nana. Christian Robinson's uplifting palette and culturally diverse cast brightens the rainy-day backdrop.”—Shelf Awareness, starred review

"Bright colors and streamlined shapes keep the urban setting and its denizens cheerful, emphasizing the positive message.”—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

“This story is full of figurative language and the art provides a distinct contemporary feel to support this urban story.”—SLC

School Library Journal
11/01/2014
K-Gr 2—After church on Sundays, CJ and his nana wait for the bus. It's a familiar routine, but this week CJ is feeling dissatisfied. As they travel to their destination, the boy asks a series of questions: "How come we gotta wait for the bus in all this wet?" "Nana, how come we don't got a car?" "How come we always gotta go here after church?" CJ is envious of kids with cars, iPods, and more freedom than he has. With each question, Nana points out something for CJ to appreciate about his life: "Boy, what do we need a car for? We got a bus that breathes fire." These gentle admonishments are phrased as questions or observations rather than direct answers so that CJ is able to take ownership of his feelings. After they exit the bus, CJ wonders why this part of town is so run-down, prompting Nana to reply, "Sometimes when you're surrounded by dirt, CJ, you're a better witness for what's beautiful." The urban setting is truly reflective, showing people with different skin colors, body types, abilities, ages, and classes in a natural and authentic manner. Robinson's flat, blocky illustrations are simple and well composed, seemingly spare but peppered with tiny, interesting details. Ultimately, their destination is a soup kitchen, and CJ is glad to be there. This is an excellent book that highlights less popular topics such as urban life, volunteerism, and thankfulness, with people of color as the main characters. A lovely title.—Anna Haase Krueger, Ramsey County Library, MN
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-10-22
A young boy yearns for what he doesn't have, but his nana teaches him to find beauty in what he has and can give, as well as in the city where they live. CJ doesn't want to wait in the rain or take the bus or go places after church. But through Nana's playful imagination and gentle leadership, he begins to see each moment as an opportunity: Trees drink raindrops from straws; the bus breathes fire; and each person has a story to tell. On the bus, Nana inspires an impromptu concert, and CJ's lifted into a daydream of colors and light, moon and magic. Later, when walking past broken streetlamps on the way to the soup kitchen, CJ notices a rainbow and thinks of his nana's special gift to see "beautiful where he never even thought to look." Through de la Peña's brilliant text, readers can hear, feel and taste the city: its grit and beauty, its quiet moments of connectedness. Robinson's exceptional artwork works with it to ensure that readers will fully understand CJ's journey toward appreciation of the vibrant, fascinating fabric of the city. Loosely defined patterns and gestures offer an immediate and raw quality to the Sasek-like illustrations. Painted in a warm palette, this diverse urban neighborhood is imbued with interest and possibility. This celebration of cross-generational bonding is a textual and artistic tour de force. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780698173330
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
01/08/2015
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
106,070
Lexile:
AD610L (what's this?)
File size:
19 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Praise for LAST STOP ON MARKET STREET:

A Winter 2014-2015 Kids' Indie Next Pick!

“This celebration of cross-generational bonding is a textual and artistic tour de force.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Like still waters, de la Peña and Robinson’s story runs deep. It finds beauty in unexpected places, explores the difference between what’s fleeting and what lasts, acknowledges inequality, and testifies to the love shared by an African-American boy and his grandmother.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review

“The urban setting is truly reflective, showing people with different skin colors, body types, abilities, ages, and classes in a natural and authentic manner… A lovely title.”School Library Journal

“It's also the warmth of [the]intergenerational relationship that will make this book so satisfying, for both young readers and the adults sharing it with them.”—New York Times Book Review 

Meet the Author

Matt de la Peña (www.mattdelapena.com) is the author of several critically-acclaimed young adult novels, as well as the celebrated picture book A Nation’s Hope: The Story of Boxing Legend Joe Louis. Matt lives in Brooklyn, NY. Follow him on Twitter @mattdelapena
 
Christian Robinson (www.theartoffun.com) is the winner of the 2014 Ezra Jack Keats New Illustrator Award, as well as the 2013 Marion Vannett Ridgeway Honor. Christian lives in San Francisco, California. 

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Last Stop on Market Street 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
This_Kid_Reviews_Books More than 1 year ago
This is a very inspiring book. It helps you see the wonders of the world, even in places you wouldn’t expect. Mr. Robinson’s art really compliments Mr. De La Peña’s story. It has that warm feeling and points to all the things that matter. I like how the twist at the end of the story reveals that CJ and his Nana go to help others. I noticed that CJ’s Nana never really shushes CJ for asking questions, like about a blind man – “How come that man can’t see?” and his Nana replies “…Some people watch the world with their ears.” That line made me smile. Mr. De La Peña has written a great picture book which makes me want to see the awesomeness in everything around me.
Anonymous 12 months ago
I love love this book! It is about a poor famliy who lives in the city. CJs grandma is right, you don't need money to be happy. ?! Absoultly good. T
Sandy5 11 months ago
There are terrific messages inside this book. I loved the way Nana shared her world with CJ, never preaching to him but showing him that there is something besides what you see on the outside. That you should judge something just by looking at it but you should discover more about that person or that item for everyone has a story or is more exciting than you think. She was patient person and she gave of herself. I also enjoyed the illustrations of the book, they showed lots of diversity and I loved the rich language the author used. The author strung words together to paint wonderful pictures in my mind as I read. Bright colors filled the pages with black font made this a wonderful storybook. As CJ is ushered out of church one Sunday with his Nana, he is tired of the same routine and as his voice echoes his complaints; his Nana shows him that the world around him is more than just what he sees. CJ wants what other individuals have and he is tired of same routine every Sunday. He does not everything and as child, he does not understand why he cannot have the few things that he wants. Nana personality is friendly and warm as they make their way to their destination. The destination is half the fun as Nana enjoys showing CJ interesting people and items along the way. Trees and buses are not just everyday items in her world for she makes them come alive and fun for CJ. CJ is all ears as he takes in everything Nana is sharing and he offers questions and comments along the way. CJ’s horizon is expanding. By listening to Nana, he begins to realize that what they do have works for them. It fits their lifestyle and it’s perfect for them. As they finally reach their destination, having viewed the streets along this path in a new light, CJ has a new outlook on his life and beauty has a new definition. 4.5 stars
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
Every Sunday after church, CJ and his grandmother get on the bus and ride it across town. None of CJ's friends do this. On the ride CJ wonders why they don't have a car like his friend Colby. Or an iPod like other boys on the bus. CJ wonders why they have to ride the bus all the way to the dirty part of town. Grandma answers each question thoughtfully as she reminds CJ that sometimes a journey is more important than the destination in Last Stop on Market Street (2015) by Matt de la Peña, illustrated by Christian Robinson. Last Stop on Market Street is de la Peña's first picture book. Brightly colored illustrations from Robinson make this book pop from the cover through to the last page. Robinson's bold, blocky style helps pictures pop--even from a distance if reading this to a group--and draws the reader's eye across each spread. De la Peña has an ear for dialogue which comes across in CJ's authentic conversations with his grandmother wondering about all the cool (to CJ) things that they lack. While I was surprised to see CJ's diction was never corrected when he asked "how come we don't got a car?" it did feel like a real kid talking throughout the story. CJ's grandmother reminds him to be grateful for little things (like an exciting bus, a guitarist on the bus who plays a song, and so on) while the pair rides across town to their final destination--a soup kitchen where CJ and his grandmother volunteer. Last Stop on Market Street is a fun story with enough text (and surprises) to make it a great choice for older picture book readers. Discussion points and Robinson's artwork also make it a great choice to read to a group. Hopefully the first of many picture books to come from de la Peña!