The Last Talk with Lola Faye

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Overview

Middling historian Lucas Paige visits St. Louis to give a sparsely attended reading—nothing out of the ordinary. Except among the yawning attendees is someone he did not expect: Lola Faye Gilroy, the “other woman” he has long blamed for his father’s murder decades earlier.
 
Reluctantly, Luke joins Lola Faye for a drink. As one drink turns into several, these two battered souls relive, from their different perspectives, the most searing ...

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Overview

Middling historian Lucas Paige visits St. Louis to give a sparsely attended reading—nothing out of the ordinary. Except among the yawning attendees is someone he did not expect: Lola Faye Gilroy, the “other woman” he has long blamed for his father’s murder decades earlier.
 
Reluctantly, Luke joins Lola Faye for a drink. As one drink turns into several, these two battered souls relive, from their different perspectives, the most searing experience of their lives. Slowly but surely, the hotel bar dissolves around them and they are transported back to the tiny southern town where this defining moment—a violent crime of passion—is turned in the light once more to reveal flaws in the old answers. As it turns out, there is much Luke doesn’t know. And what he doesn’t know can hurt him. Trapped in an increasingly intense emotional exchange, and with no place to go save back into his own dark past, Luke struggles to gain control of an ever more threatening conversation, to discover why Lola Faye has come and what she is after—before it is too late.
 
A taut literary thriller in the gothic tradition of Master of the Delta.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this tightly coiled, intellectual drama, Cook (The Chatham School Affair) unwinds a marvelously tense story of belated redemption. While in St. Louis for a book tour, Luke Page, a middle-aged writer of lackluster histories, agrees to meet with a long-forgotten acquaintance, the “little hayseed tramp” he believes triggered a bloody tragedy that befell his family decades earlier. The story alternates between Luke’s recollections of his hometown; the “heady ambition” of the despicably cruel, contemptuous younger Luke, who wants to go to Harvard and gets swept up “in the lethal tide of [his] own grand dream”; and the numb, disillusioned academic who sits down for a drink with Lola Faye Gilroy. A vertiginous precipice eventually materializes in front of Luke, who must finally confront the true nature of his father’s heinous murder and its equally tragic aftermath. The younger Luke is without a doubt one of the more convincing modern villains, a single-minded overachiever devoured by raging oedipal loathing and equally consumed by narcissistic ambition. (Aug.)
From the Publisher
"In this tightly coiled, intellectual drama, Cook (The Chatham School Affair) unwinds a marvelously tense story of belated redemption. While in St. Louis for a book tour, Luke Paige, a middle-aged writer of lackluster histories, agrees to meet with a long-forgotten acquaintance, the "little hayseed tramp" he believes triggered a bloody tragedy that befell his family decades earlier. The story alternates between Luke's recollections of his hometown; the "heady ambition" of the despicably cruel, contemptuous younger Luke, who wants to go to Harvard and gets swept up "in the lethal tide of [his] own grand dream"; and the numb, disillusioned academic who sits down for a drink with Lola Faye Gilroy. A vertiginous precipice eventually materializes in front of Luke, who must finally confront the true nature of his father’s heinous murder and its equally tragic aftermath. The younger Luke is without a doubt one of the more convincing modern villains, a single-minded overachiever devoured by raging oedipal loathing and equally consumed by narcissistic ambition."
—Publishers Weekly, STARRED
Library Journal
While on a book promotion tour in St. Louis, history professor Lucas (Luke) Page has managed to unload a single autographed copy of his latest tome onto a rather dowdy but delightfully irrepressible older woman who introduces herself as Lola Faye Gilroy. She's the woman he's regarded for years as the reason for his father's murder decades before in the small town of Glenville, AL. Her appearance opens the floodgates of memory as surely as if she were Proust's madeleine. The remainder of the novel is the extended conversation between the two, fueled (for him) by glasses of pinot noir and (for her) by appletinis with occasional forays into calamari ("it's like a cross between a French fry and a rubber band"). During the evening, she develops a taste for both as the pair unearth the sins, lies, blindness, and odd murders that have brought them to where they are.Verdict Edgar and Barry Award winner Cook (The Chatham School Affair, Red Leaves) has described himself as "one of the best-known unknown writers"; with his latest he'll likely retain his title for, in this genre-driven world, mystery fans will find him discursive, while he may well be overlooked by his real audience, fans of quirky small-town fiction of the type written by Richard Russo. However, those seeking a good, old-fashioned, character-driven storyteller who offers something to mull over would do well to seek out Cook on his next book tour.—Bob Lunn, Kansas City, MO
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781602858954
  • Publisher: Center Point Large Print
  • Publication date: 11/1/2010
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Edition description: Large Print Edition
  • Pages: 366
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

THOMAS H. COOK was born in Fort Payne, Alabama. He has been nominated for Edgar Awards seven times in five different categories. He received the Best Novel Edgar, the Barry for Best Novel, and has been nominated for numerous other awards.

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Read an Excerpt

So, Luke, what’s the last best hope of life?
 The memory surfaced as it often did, out of the blue, for no apparent reason: Julia, my lost wife, glances up from something she’s been reading, takes off her glasses, and, knowing that nothing will ever open inside me until I answer it, she bluntly poses her question.
 I was standing before a glass display case filled with old frontier blankets when this memory last came to me. The blankets were thick and rough, and I imagined those first westward settlers curled up beneath them, whole families pressed together as they waited out the night. How fiercely the prairie winds must have lashed their little wagons, shaking the spindly frames and billowing out the canvas. Later they’d no doubt used these same blankets to ward off the frigid cold that had so ruthlessly whipped the plains, spreading them over the dirt floors of their dugouts, or layering them over their own shivering bodies, where they’d huddled with their dogs as the wind howled outside. How much warmth these blankets must have provided, I thought. How often they must have seemed the only warmth.
 It was this sense of physical suffering in the service of some great hope that had once formed the basis for all my human sympathy, the one deep feeling that was truly mine, and that had once fired my dream—boyishly, perhaps, but yet more powerfully for that—of writing my own great books.
 In those books, I’d hoped to portray the physical feel of American history, its tactile core: the searing bite of a minié ball, the sting of a lash, the muscular ache of hard labor and the squint of small chores—what it had actually felt like to pick cotton, hew a tree, fire a locomotive, thread a needle made of whalebone, shape a candle by another candle’s light. Mine would be histories with a heartbeat—palpable, alive, histories that pulsed with true feeling.
 I’d done none of that, I knew, as I turned from that glass case, those neatly stacked frontier blankets. I’d written a few books, the most recent to be published just three months from now, but I’d never created anything that approached the works it had been my youthful ambition to write.
 It’s one thing to bury an old dead dream, however, and quite another to attempt, again and again, to resurrect a dream you can’t let die, which is what I’d done, always beginning with a passionate concept, then watching as it shrank to a bloodless monograph. I’d repeated this process many times, and later that same afternoon, only a few minutes after I’d stood before those frontier blankets, I prepared my desk for yet another run at my old best hope, but stopped and found myself thinking about where it had all begun.
 Then, rather suddenly, it came to me, a memory of my mother’s wedding ring. Just before leaving Glenville, I’d picked it up and looked at it closely, like a jeweler, recalling all the times I’d seen her delicately remove it before washing dishes because she feared it might slip off and disappear down the drain. At the heart of those memories, I should have felt some gritty aspect of her life: the weight of an iron as she pushed it across a shirt, the oily touch of dishwater, the gooey damp of batter, and if not these, then at least I should have been able to infuse the ring she’d cherished with that power of time and remembrance we trivialize with the phrase sentimental value.
 Surely, I should have felt something at such a moment, but tellingly, I hadn’t. Unless one could call numbness a feeling, for that was the only sensation I’d actually had, a numbness at the core, everything dry, brittle, dead, all of which should have told me that no matter how many times I tried, I would never write the deeply sentient books it had been my dream to write, that I was, and always would be, as Julia had once said, a strangely shriveled thing.
 Standing at my desk, recalling the unfeeling way with which I’d stared at my mother’s ring, I heard again her earlier question: So, Luke, what’s the last best hope of life?
 I glanced out the window, into the chill September rain, and thought again of how life’s darkest acts pool and swirl, but never go under the bridge.
 So, Luke, what’s the last best hope of life?
 I’d had no answer then.
 Now I do.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 6

Part 1 Making Life Miserable for the Liberal Party 9

Part 2 Keating's Way with Words 38

Part 3 KEATING! The Musical We Had to Have 174

Further Reading 184

Acknowledgments 186

Illustration Sources 187

Index 189

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Customer Reviews

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( 15 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 21, 2010

    One of the best mysteries written

    As a former book buyer/wholesale distributor I have probably read more mysteries than most because I was inundated with them. It is without reservation that I enthusiastically pick Tom Cook's The Last Talk With Lola Faye as one of my favorite reading experiences. That's 50 years of mystery reading.

    What makes this mystery so exceptional? Firstly, it takes a master to make a convincing book out of a conversation between two people, primarily in one location. But this conversation is filled with intense mystery and suspense and gives the reader a visual panorama of ALL the characters that are in the book. It is a cinematic retrospective-the vivid and fascinating recollections of two people. The character development is simply breathtaking. Gradual revelations and racheted tension make this book a mystery lover's dream.

    Secondly, this author's use of the English language is second to none. His style is simple and direct and what he packs into a page in insightfulness, perspicacity and wisdom makes the book worth reading. As a piece of literature it is elegantly written with an exactness with words and an eloquence of expression.

    When all is said and done this is a wonderful book about realization, transformation and redemption. Simply put, a GREAT read!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2010

    Best book I have read in a long time.

    I am a fan of Thomas H. Cook. This book was thought-provoking and insightful. I couldn't put it down-it was a real page-turner. It was a book that made you think and will stay in your mind for a long time after finishing it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 11, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Another Great Mystery by Thomas H. Cook

    What would you do to get what you want? How far would you go to make someone pay for something they purportedly did? What is the extent of human behavior? That's what Thomas H. Cook delves into in The Last Talk With Lola Faye.

    Once Luke's teacher, Ms. McDowell, tells him he has the potential to go to Harvard on scholarship, that's all Luke thinks of. Getting out of Glenville, AL at any cost. Unfortunately, his lofty goals of writing a stirring, emotional tribute to the every day person was never reached. Instead, he is visiting St. Louis, talking to a museum crowd about his latest dull book on fateful decisions in battle.

    Lola Faye Gilroy, his father's assistant at the money losing Variety Store is also in St,. Louis, there to kill two birds with one stone, see the St. Louis arch and have a last conversation with Luke. It was presumed that Lola Faye was having an affair with Luke's father, Doug. Her estranged husband, Woody, killed Doug and later himself. While the Sheriff attributed it to murder/suicide, Cook plants enough suspense and innuendo to make the reader wonder.

    Luke's and Lola Faye's conversation at the bar in his hotel twists and turns, flashes back to events in Glenville, makes Luke wonder about Lola Faye's motives both then and now. His writing always has this air about it...mystical, meandering, cloudy, ruminating. As the conversation advances, readers will be unsure as to who might have done what.

    While The Chatham School Affair, for personal reasons, will always be my favorite Cook book, this and Master of the Delta are right up there. Take every opportunity to read a Thomas H. Cook mystery.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    a remarkable story of regret and redemption

    Poetic...dark...suspenseful...satisfying. For this reader each of these words aptly describe award winning author Thomas H. Cook's beautifully written novel THE LAST TALK WITH LOLA FAYE. Reading it is a bit like watching an absorbing two person play as the story is revealed in a conversation between two characters - Lucas "Luke" Page and Lola Faye Gilroy.

    Luke is a fair to middling professor and writer who has come to St. Louis to deliver a lecture at the Museum of the West. It's a dreary, wet December evening, and he doesn't anticipate much of a crowd - there seldom is at his lectures. However, the last person he expected or wanted to see was Lola Faye Gilroy, his father's mistress. Her husband had shot and killed his father, and then killed himself. All of this in Glenville, Alabama, a tired Southern town where his father ran a variety store.

    Now, Glenville was not your pretty little town but a place pockmarked by abandoned storefronts "their empty windows staring like blinded eyes onto deserted sidewalks....and a windowless library housed in the basement of the police department." Plus "a trailer park perpetually pulsing in the light of a police cruiser, diesel trucks sitting like exhausted mastodons in red-dirt driveways." It was a place Luke couldn't wait to leave - of course, he would leave because he was considered to be "the smartest kid in town." As far as he was concerned Glenville limited his intellectual prowess; he believed that some day he would write a great novel. Yet here he was some years later addressing a sparse audience, and unable to turn Lola Faye down when she urged him to have a drink with her.

    As one drink turns into several and their conversation moves on Luke becomes introspective, looking back upon events, mistakes he had made, remembering Fitzgerald saying "you lose yourself in pieces." He wonders if his first small deceit was where the first piece of him had fallen away.

    Luke had believed he knew all about his father, an uninspired man who wasn't even able to run a small store efficiently, and left his mother alone for trysts with Lola Faye. He was a man Luke was never able to please, Yet, as the story progresses we find out just how little he really knows about his family or himself.

    THE LAST TALK WITH LOLA FAYE is a landmark novel, a story of regret and redemption that will remain with you long after closing the last page.

    - Gail Cooke

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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