The Last Time I Wore a Dress

( 6 )

Overview

At fifteen years old, Daphne Scholinski was committed to a mental institution and awarded the dubious diagnosis of "Gender Identity Disorder." She spent three years—and over a million dollars of insurance—"treating" the problem...with makeup lessons and instructions in how to walk like a girl. Daphne's story—which is, sadly, not that unusual—has already received attention from such shows as "20/20," "Dateline," "Today," and "Leeza." But her memoir, bound to become a classic, tells the story in a funny, ironic, ...

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Overview

At fifteen years old, Daphne Scholinski was committed to a mental institution and awarded the dubious diagnosis of "Gender Identity Disorder." She spent three years—and over a million dollars of insurance—"treating" the problem...with makeup lessons and instructions in how to walk like a girl. Daphne's story—which is, sadly, not that unusual—has already received attention from such shows as "20/20," "Dateline," "Today," and "Leeza." But her memoir, bound to become a classic, tells the story in a funny, ironic, unforgettable voice that "isn't all grim; Scholinski tells her story in beautifully evocative prose and mines her experiences for every last drop of ironic humor, determined to have the last laugh." (Time Out New York)

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Editorial Reviews

Laura Green

The boom in first-person narrative has produced a frightening subgenre that testifies to our cultural obsession with controlling expressions of gender and sexuality. This subgenre, which includes Leslie Feinberg's Stone Butch Blues and Susanna Kaysen's Girl, Interrupted as well as Daphne Scholinski's new book The Last Time I Wore a Dress, details the punishments -- including physical assault, sexual abuse and institutionalization -- visited upon young women who fail to live up to prevailing definitions of femininity. Scholinski's mordant memoir recounts the three years she spent paying for this failure in facilities for the psychiatric treatment of adolescents, where her tomboyish appearance and history of minor delinquency earned her the diagnosis of "Gender Identity Disorder."

Scholinski was 15 when her parents committed her. Her artistic mother left her marriage when Scholinski was in sixth grade, aiming to "find herself" in the '70s counterculture. Her father, a Vietnam vet haunted by memories of a "killing rage," took to punishing Scholinski's household infractions with a belt. Scholinski's search for comfort had her turning to gang members and sexual predators. Her amusements included shoplifting, petty theft and truancy. By the time she found herself on the way to her first hospital admission, she writes, "If I felt anything ... it was a stab of hope."

Her memoir records the betrayal of this hope. Rather than treating the psychic scars of neglect and physical and sexual abuse, her doctors increasingly focused on her lack of conventional femininity. At her second hospital, Scholinski's "treatment plan" included spending 15 minutes every morning applying make-up with her roommate. Wearing eye shadow and hugging male staff members earned her institutional privileges. At the third and final facility, her therapists considered her close, quasi-romantic friendship with another female patient evidence of "regression," and banned eye contact between the two. Scholinski left this last facility at the age of 18 with a high-school diploma, a legacy of night terrors and a mental storehouse of images of tormented bodies that she now reworks in paintings and drawings.

The Last Time I Wore a Dress demonstrates both the strengths and the weaknesses of the confessional memoir. Scholinski intersperses the narrative of her institutional journey with scenes of her childhood and excerpts from official diagnoses and evaluations. Bleak humor and jump-cut organization give readers breathing room in the miasma of inattention and violence surrounding her. We take comfort in the implied presence of the current Daphne Scholinski, the healthy consciousness selecting, arranging and reflecting on her experience.

Yet this very selectivity and fragmentation inevitably limit our understanding of the people and events in the book. For example, Scholinski's mother comes through as her most important, and ambiguous, adult influence, but their relationship is portrayed only glancingly. As a person, of course, I understand that Scholinski's relationships are my business only so far as she chooses to share them. As a reader, however, I regret that her story sometimes stretches thin around gaps it might cost her too much to fill in. Nevertheless, if it causes us to question the rigidity of our cultural definitions of gender, it can certainly be called a success story. -- Salon

BUST Magazine
Any...gal who reads The Last Time I Wore a Dress is bound to see at least one of Daphne's symptoms in herself.
Kirkus Reviews
This patient's-eye view of life in a psychiatric hospital in the 1980s draws on the techniques of Susanna Kaysen's Girl, Interrupted but offers an original perspective on the dubious diagnosis Scholinski was given: Gender Identity Disorder.

With a depressed mother and a father traumatized by service in Vietnam, Scholinski had an adolescence marked by physical and emotional abuse at home, teasing by schoolmates about her tomboyish appearance, and sexual molestation by strangers and others in positions of authority. She was turned over to the care of a mental hospital by parents who could not handle her minor acts of juvenile delinquency. Faced with the challenge of diagnosing her problems, doctors at the Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago decided the short-haired, ripped-jeans-and-rock-T-shirt-attired Scholinski was not "feminine" enough. When she became close friends with a new girl on the ward, she was accused of lesbianism. Thus she spent her high-school years locked up and marooned among the delusional, the suicidal, and the schizophrenic, being given "girly lessons" in makeup, dress, flirting, and other feminine skills. Former Boston Globe reporter Adams helps create an intimate narrative wherein the complex, ironic voice of the misunderstood young woman takes center stage (speaking of the $1 million price tag of her three-year treatment and her roommate's makeup lesons, Scholinski writes, "For the price, I would have thought they'd bring in someone really good, maybe Vidal Sassoon"). The reprinting of institutional evaluative documents, à la Kaysen, provides effective context for the author's retellings of the hospital experience. Scholinski is now a San Francisco artist and activist who, though she continues to struggle with depression, is free to dress and wear her hair and choose her partners as she wishes.

A notable book. Scholinski is a pychiatric memoirist with a powerful voice and a mission: to debunk doctors who continue to diagnose gender identity disorders.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781573226967
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/28/1998
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 320,801
  • Product dimensions: 9.04 (w) x 5.46 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Daphne Scholinski is an artist who lives in San Francisco. She is also an activist who speaks at colleges and universities about psychiatric abuse of gay and lesbian teenagers. She was a speaker at the NGO Conference on Women in Beijing, and her story has appeared on ABC-TV's 20/20.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 21, 2012

    This book is so amazing. Although the subject matter is dark, t

    This book is so amazing. Although the subject matter is dark, the matter of fact way the author relays her harrowing experience is both unique and refreshing. She could have made it just another "woe is me" type story, but instead she shows her resilience and empathy for others who are in even worse situations. I didn't want to put this book down and was sad when I finished reading it. This would make an excellent movie. I would want Ellen Page to play Daphne. ******

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  • Posted August 8, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great comment on our society...

    I am now getting my daughter to read this book. I read it about eight years ago and could not put it down. The author tells her story so well and it is a great comment on how our society defines women by how they look, not by what they do.

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  • Posted April 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    my new favorite book

    wow what to say? hmm...honestly im one of those read half the book then put it down kind of kids however i couldnt with this book. read it(x3) youll love it i promise i actually stayed up till 3 am (in that mindless unaware state of how many pages id read) its amazing and so touching. 10/5 stars!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2008

    A reviewer

    This is the first book I've read in a long time that I just couldn't put down. I felt more compelled to read this than to sleep, and finished it in two days. Scholinski tells a moving story, and the book is very well written.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2004

    A story wonderfully told

    I would fully recommend this book for anyone; it's great if you're just looking for something to read or if you're reading it to fill in your studies (I'm a gender studies major and it pertains to some of my discussion groups).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2003

    Excellent Read

    Very good book. First person perspective with opinions make this book and entertaining and informative read.

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