The Late Age of Print: Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control

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Overview

Ted Striphas argues that, although the production and propagation of books have undoubtedly entered a new phase, printed works are still very much a part of our everyday lives. With examples from trade journals, news media, films, advertisements, and a host of other commercial and scholarly materials, Striphas tells a story of modern publishing that proves, even in a rapidly digitizing world, books are anything but dead.

From the rise of retail superstores to Oprah's phenomenal ...

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The Late Age of Print: Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control

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Overview

Ted Striphas argues that, although the production and propagation of books have undoubtedly entered a new phase, printed works are still very much a part of our everyday lives. With examples from trade journals, news media, films, advertisements, and a host of other commercial and scholarly materials, Striphas tells a story of modern publishing that proves, even in a rapidly digitizing world, books are anything but dead.

From the rise of retail superstores to Oprah's phenomenal reach, Striphas tracks the methods through which the book industry has adapted (or has failed to adapt) to rapid changes in twentieth-century print culture. Barnes & Noble, Borders, and Amazon.com have established new routes of traffic in and around books, and pop sensations like Harry Potter and the Oprah Book Club have inspired the kind of brand loyalty that could only make advertisers swoon. At the same time, advances in digital technology have presented the book industry with extraordinary threats and unique opportunities.

Striphas's provocative analysis offers a counternarrative to those who either triumphantly declare the end of printed books or deeply mourn their passing. With wit and brilliant insight, he isolates the invisible processes through which books have come to mediate our social interactions and influence our habits of consumption, integrating themselves into our routines and intellects like never before.

Columbia University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Choice

A solid work of scholarship that fills in several significant gaps... Highly Recommended.

Booklist

Forget the premature obituaries for books and reading. Striphas insists that books remain a vital presence in the twenty-first century.

Sacramento Book Review

The Late Age of Print is an important history of the book and their impact on (mostly) American culture.

Critical Flame
It is rare to say of a university press hardcover that it is a "must-read," but for those interested in the confluence of culture and economics as it relates to books, that is what The Late Age of Print is.

— Richard Nash

Information Today
This book is a gold mine of information and thought about book culture in the 20th and 21st centuries.

— Gwen M. Gregory

Choice

A solid work of scholarship that fills in several significant gaps... Highly Recommended.

Publishing Research Quarterly

A magnificent achievement that makes a compelling series of arguments about the continuing importance of books and book publishing.

Books and Culture

Striphas does an excellent job.

— Alan Jacobs

Technology and Culture

What is it that you purchase when you buy a book? In describing the answer, [Striphas]is admirably clear about the choices publishers or booksellers made, and why.

Books & Culture
Striphas does an excellent job.

— Alan Jacobs

Critical Flame - Richard Nash

It is rare to say of a university press hardcover that it is a "must-read," but for those interested in the confluence of culture and economics as it relates to books, that is what The Late Age of Print is.

Information Today - Gwen M. Gregory

This book is a gold mine of information and thought about book culture in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Books and Culture - Alan Jacobs

Striphas does an excellent job.

Publishers Weekly
Attempting to short circuit the perennial chorus of eulogies for the publishing industry, the book, and/or print media as a whole, Striphas explores the culture of books and book reading in a time of rapid change-not just in media technology, but in "patterns of work and leisure, ... laws governing commodity ownership and use," and elsewhere-without presuming the medium faces "a full-blown crisis." A communications and cultural studies professor, Striphas (of Indiana University) traces the modern evolution of the book as it has been affected by commercial phenomena like the big box bookstore, mass distribution, e-books and Oprah's book club, managing to craft an accessible and entertaining narrative out of a highly academic history (oddly enough, the world-wide legal adventures of Harry Potter are especially captivating). Though he can get repetitive, Striphas sees the culture clearly in its parts and as a whole, and this collection of historical and commercial analysis should fascinate those seriously involved with book culture and/or the industry.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231148153
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 1/4/2011
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 966,674
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Ted Striphas is assistant professor in the Department of Communication and Culture and adjunct professor of American Studies and Cultural Studies at Indiana University. He is the coeditor of the book Communication as... : Perspectives on Theory and a special issue on intellectual property published by the journal Cultural Studies. To learn more, visit his Web site at www.thelateageofprint.org.

Columbia University Press

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgmentsIntroduction: The Late Age of Print1. E-books and the Digital Future2. The Big-Box Bookstore Blues3. Bringing Bookland Online4. Literature as Life on Oprah's Book Club5. Harry Potter and the Culture of the CopyConclusion: From Consumerism to ControlNotesIndex

Columbia University Press

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Customer Reviews

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