Later Travels (I Tatti Renaissance Library)

Overview

Early Renaissance humanists discovered the culture of ancient Greece and Rome mostly through the study of classical manuscripts. Cyriac of Ancona (Ciriaco de' Pizzecolli, 1391-1452), a merchant and diplomat as well as a scholar, was among the first to study the physical remains of the ancient world in person and for that reason is sometimes regarded as the father of classical archaeology. His travel diaries and letters are filled with descriptions of classical sites, drawings of buildings and statues, and copies ...

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Overview

Early Renaissance humanists discovered the culture of ancient Greece and Rome mostly through the study of classical manuscripts. Cyriac of Ancona (Ciriaco de' Pizzecolli, 1391-1452), a merchant and diplomat as well as a scholar, was among the first to study the physical remains of the ancient world in person and for that reason is sometimes regarded as the father of classical archaeology. His travel diaries and letters are filled with descriptions of classical sites, drawings of buildings and statues, and copies of hundreds of Latin and Greek inscriptions. Cyriac came to see it as his calling to record the current state of the remains of antiquity and to lobby with local authorities for their preservation, recognizing that archaeological evidence was an irreplaceable complement to the written record.

This volume presents letters and diaries from 1443 to 1449, the period of his final voyages, which took him from Italy to the eastern shore of the Adriatic, the Greek mainland, the Aegean islands, Anatolia and Thrace, Mount Athos, Constantinople, the Cyclades, and Crete. Cyriac's accounts of his travels, with their commentary reflecting his wide-ranging antiquarian, political, religious, and commercial interests, provide a fascinating record of the encounter of the Renaissance world with the legacy of classical antiquity. The Latin texts assembled for this edition have been newly edited and most of them appear here for the first time in English. The edition is enhanced with reproductions of Cyriac's sketches and a map of his travels.

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Editorial Reviews

New York Review of Books

As Cyriac crossed and recrossed the Mediterranean, catching rides on Venetian and Genoesc naval ships as one might now take suburban commuter trains and calmly examining gems with their captains, he pursued his lifelong effort "to speak with the dead"—a vocation that took him through the Aegean, down to Egypt, and into mainland Greece and led him to record his adventures in richly detailed letters as well as the notebooks in which he copied inscriptions. Cyriac documented his two stays at Cyzicus with characteristic care.
— Anthony T. Grafton

New York Review of Books - Anthony T. Grafton
As Cyriac crossed and recrossed the Mediterranean, catching rides on Venetian and Genoesc naval ships as one might now take suburban commuter trains and calmly examining gems with their captains, he pursued his lifelong effort "to speak with the dead"--a vocation that took him through the Aegean, down to Egypt, and into mainland Greece and led him to record his adventures in richly detailed letters as well as the notebooks in which he copied inscriptions. Cyriac documented his two stays at Cyzicus with characteristic care.
New York Review of Books
As Cyriac crossed and recrossed the Mediterranean, catching rides on Venetian and Genoesc naval ships as one might now take suburban commuter trains and calmly examining gems with their captains, he pursued his lifelong effort "to speak with the dead"--a vocation that took him through the Aegean, down to Egypt, and into mainland Greece and led him to record his adventures in richly detailed letters as well as the notebooks in which he copied inscriptions. Cyriac documented his two stays at Cyzicus with characteristic care.
— Anthony T. Grafton
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674007581
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 12/1/2003
  • Language: Latin
  • Series: I Tatti Renaissance Library Series , #10
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 1,408,831
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.22 (h) x 1.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Edward W. Bodnar is Professor of Classics, Emeritus, Georgetown University.
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Table of Contents

Introduction

Map

Illustrations

December 1443 to 4 May 1444: Ascoli Piceno to Foglia Nuova
1. To Emperor John VIII Palaiologos, after 26 February 1444, off Euboea

2. To Cardinal Giuliano Cesarini, 3 December 1443, Ragusa

3. To Andreolo Giustiniani-Banca, 29 March 1444, Chios

4. To Andreolo, 2 April 1444, Foglia Nuova

5. To Andreolo, 27 March 1444, Manisa

6. To Andreolo, 24 April 1444, Foglia Nuova

7. To Andreolo, 4 May 1444, Foglia Nuova

22 May to 21 July 1444: Adrianople and Constantinople

8. To Andreolo, 22 May 1444, Adrianople

9, 9a, 9b1. To Andreolo, 12 June 1444, Adrianople

9b2. To Andreolo, 18 June 1444, Adrianople

10. To John Hunyadi, 12 June 1444, Adrianople

11. To John Hunyadi, 24 June 1444, Galata/Pera

12. To Andreolo, 19 July 1444, Constantinople

13. To Andreolo, 21 July 1444, Constantinople

25 July 1444 to 25 February 1445: The Propontis and Northern Aegean

Diary I: Travels in the Propontis, 25 July to 12 August 1444 (including letter 14)

14. To Raffaele Castiglione, 12 August 1444, Perinthus

15. To Andreolo, 27 August 1444, Constantinople

16. To Giuliano Cesarini, 12 and 19 September 1444, Constantinople

Diary II: Travels in the Northern Aegean, 20 September 1444 to January 1445 (including letters 17 and 18)

17. To George Scholarios, 29 September 1444, Imbros

18. To an unknown addressee, 29 September 1444, Imbros

19. To Giovanni Pedemontano, January 1445, Ainos

20. To Boruele Grimaldi, 19 January 1445, Ainos

21. To Andreolo, 25 February 1445, Lemnos

April to December 1445: The Cyclades and Crete

22. To Andreolo, 4 April 1445, Mykonos

Diary III: Travels in the Cyclades, April 1445

23. To Niccolò Zancarolo, 5 July 1445, Cydonia, Crete

24. To Andreolo, 15 July 1445, Cydonia

Diary IV: Travels in Crete, July to October 1445 (including letters 25 and 26)

25. To Melchiore Bandini, 12 August 1445, Candia, Crete

26. To M. Lepomagno, October 1445, Candia

27. To Andreolo, 7 November 1445, Candia

28. To Andreolo, December 1445, Paros

13 January to 8 April 1446: Chios, Miletus, Lesbos, Foglia Nuova

29. To Andreolo, after 13 January 1446, Chios

30. To Andreolo, after 1 February 1446, Miletus

31. From Andreolo to Buonaccorso Grimani, 12 February 1446, Chios

32. To Andreolo, 2 March 1446, Khardamyla, Chios

33. To Andreolo, 6 March 1446, Kalloni, Lesbos

34. To Andreolo, 13 March 1446, Mytilene, Lesbos

35. To Andreolo, 8 April 1446, Foglia Nuova

20 April to August 1446: Manisa, Foglia Nuova, Galata/Pera

36. To Andreolo, 20 April 1446, Manisa

37. To Andreolo, 11 May 1446, Foglia Nuova

38. To Franzesco di Drapieri, 15 August 1446, Galata/Pera

39. To Baldassare Maruffo, after 21 August 1446, Galata/Pera

13 February to 18 May 1447: Chios and Environs

40. To Andreolo, 13 February 1447, Foglia Nuova

41. To Andreolo, 20 February 1447, Foglia Nuova

42. To Andreolo, 22 February 1447, Foglia Nuova

43. To Andreolo, 16 April 1447, Homerica, Chios

44. To Cyriac in Chios from Domenico Grimani, 20 May 1447, Rhodes

45. To Andreolo, 28 May 1447, Chios

30 July 1447 to October 1448: The Peloponnesus, Epirus

Diary V: Travels in the Peloponnesus, 30 July 1447 to 17 April 1448

46. Diary fragment: Account of a royal hunt, 8-13 September 1448, Arta in Epirus

47. To Niccolò Ansalone from Pasquale Sorgo, 11 September 1448, copied by Cyriac in Arta

48. Diary fragment: Dodona and Rhogous, 18 October 1448, Arta

49. To Egidio of Megara, after 19 October 1448, Arta

24 June to 8 July 1449: Return to Italy

50. To Roberto Valturio, 24 June 1449, Ravenna

51 To Roberto Valturio, after 24 June 1449, Ravenna

52. On Donatello's statue of Gattamelata, June 1449, Padua

53. In praise of Rogier van der Weyden, 8 July 1449, Ferrara

Biographical Notes

Note on the Texts

Notes to the Text

Notes to the Translation

Bibliography

Index

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