Latin American Fiction and the Narratives of the Perverse: Paper Dolls and Spider Women

Overview

Latin American Fiction and the Narratives of the Perverse contains analysis of sexual perversion and narrative creativity in fictions from the Latin American Boom and post-Boom. Latin American novelists of the twentieth century tell stories about extreme male sexualities—machismo, homosexuality, fetishism, masochism, transvestism-in complex negotiations with the stories told by Freud and other sexologists, exemplifying some and queering others. O'Connor undertakes close readings of Puig, Lezama Lima, Cortázar, ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$104.55
BN.com price
(Save 4%)$110.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $21.85   
  • New (4) from $53.57   
  • Used (5) from $21.85   
Sending request ...

Overview

Latin American Fiction and the Narratives of the Perverse contains analysis of sexual perversion and narrative creativity in fictions from the Latin American Boom and post-Boom. Latin American novelists of the twentieth century tell stories about extreme male sexualities—machismo, homosexuality, fetishism, masochism, transvestism-in complex negotiations with the stories told by Freud and other sexologists, exemplifying some and queering others. O'Connor undertakes close readings of Puig, Lezama Lima, Cortázar, Fuentes, Donoso, and Sarduy in search of a perverse literary history of Latin America.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Paper Dolls and Spider Women proposes superbly uncanny readings of some of the most important Latin American texts written in the second half of the 20th century. With admirable energy and deceptive ease, Pat O'Connor sets out to queer these texts, illuminating his readings through well-articulated reflections on psychoanalysis, gender theory, and literary history. He has a gift for discovering unexpected relations among these "narratives of the perverse," for engaging in provocative and fruitful digression, and for establishing off-beat genealogies that, on closer look, appear irrefutable. This is a stunning book, intelligently articulated and beautifully written." -Sylvia Molloy, Albert Schweitzer Chair in the Humanities, New York University

"Patrick O'Connor's literary history of the perverse repositions Latin American literature of the latter half of the 20th century, most particularly that of the boom, vis-à-vis its treatment of queer desires. The emblematic figure of the spider woman inspires his readings of homosexuality, fetishism, sadism, masochism, transvestitism and other perversions in the works of many of the greatest writers of the 50s, 60s and 70s. Delightfully original, this book is highly recommended to scholars and fans of Latin American literature and queer studies alike." —Robert McKee Irwin, Tulane University

"Employing a sensitive understanding—and a critique—of Freudian theory and its derivatives, O'Connor shows us how representations of male deviance—homosexuality, voyeurism, fetishism, sadism, and transvestism—have shaped the trajectory of the Latin American literary canon. At the same time, Latin American Fiction and the Narratives of the Perverse foregrounds the role of the queer theorist, whose task it is to interpret and to challenge the categories by which we define what is normal or aberrant. Ultimately, O'Connor makes a case for a particular erotics of reading: one that is itself representative of the perverse in its finding pleasure in alternative cultural forms." — Carlos J. Alonso, Professor of Romance Languages, University of Pennsylvania

"Stunning, witty, and elegantly written. O'Connor examines recent Latin American literature and comes up with a timely re-reading of major works. A superb work of scholarship, the book seduces the reader with a sophisticated web of perversions seldom critically examined in Latin American fiction." — Jose Quiroga, Emory University

"Sophisticated and original...[O'Connor] shows that, even when some of the authors on whom he focuses have been widely studied in the Latin American and North American academies, their most disturbing aspects have tended to be erased in order to make them fit in a certain representation of what is supposed to be characteristic of Latin American literature."—Reinaldo Laddaga, University of Pennsylvania

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781403966780
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 12/28/2004
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Patrick O'Connor is Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies at Oberlin College.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Enter the Spider Woman: An Introduction to the Narratives of the Perverse
• The Impenetrability and the Glory: Ellipsing Lezama Lima
• The Moving Target of Fixated Desire: Felisberto's Paper Dolls
• Fashionable and Unfashionable Perversions on the Latin American Rive Gauche: Cortázar and Pizarnik Read the Bloody Countess
• (Triple) Cross-Dressing the Boom: Fuentes, Donoso, Sarduy and the Queer Sixties
• Lip-Synching "Woman"
• Severo Sarduy's Flaming Creatures
• Conclusions: Perverse Narratives on the Border

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)