Latin Prose Composition for College Use by Walter Miller | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Latin Prose Composition for College Use

Latin Prose Composition for College Use

by Walter Miller
     
 

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The book has no illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website (GeneralBooksClub.com). You can also preview excerpts of the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select

Overview

The book has no illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher's website (GeneralBooksClub.com). You can also preview excerpts of the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge.
Original Publisher: Leach, Shewell and Sanborn;
Publication date: 1891;
Subjects: Latin language; Foreign Language Study / Latin;

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940027154073
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
145 KB

Read an Excerpt


EXERCISES FOR WRITTEN TRANSLATION. CICERO, LAELIUS. Chapter I. 1 The book in which Cicero sets forth his views 'on the subject of friendship is, like the Cato Major, a dialogue made to rest on the authority of men of 2 the olden times. This essay, 2as well as the other, Cicero dedicated to his friend Atticus, who had often urged him to write a book of this sort, and8 at whose request he had, not many months4 before, composed 3 his treatise5 on old age. In the latter6 work,7 Cato, almost the oldest and certainly the wisest man of his times, was just the character to take that part in a discussion on old age in which Cicero introduced 4 him; for he was an old man for many years and refers to Synonyms. 250, Hem.: A. and S. 415: G. 400: H. 423. 1 de. and disputatio. 2 i.e. also. 6 What pronoun ? See A. and 8 When translated ? SeeSyn., G. 102, a: A. and S. 181 (4): G. B.v., note 2. 290, Eem. 1: H. 450, 2. What case ? See A. and G. 7 Why not opus ? in his very age lie was eminently happy. In the 1 former,1 Laelius, surnamed " the Wise " and far-famed for his intimate friendship with Scipio, discusses friendship. After the death of Scipio, 2B.c. 129, the eyes of all 2 were turned to Laelius to see8 how he bore his affliction. A wise man like him ought to find his virtue 3 superior to all the changes and chances of mortal life. But people8 feared that he did not bear his 4 grief as became5 the true philosopher; for, inasmuch 5 as he had been absent from the last meeting of the college of augurs, they thought that in his deep sorrow he 'had been unfaithful to a duty which at all other times he had performed most scrupulously. But 6 they 7were unjust to accuse8 a manof so sound a character of neglecting9 his duty; for it was his 7 health and ...

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