Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation

Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation

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by Ray Suarez
     
 

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As the largest minority in the country, Latino Americans make up an integral part of American history and continue to make major social, cultural, and political contributions. Latino Americans shares their story, revealing the personal struggles and successes of immigrants, poets, soldiers, and others who have made an impact on history.

Author and

Overview

As the largest minority in the country, Latino Americans make up an integral part of American history and continue to make major social, cultural, and political contributions. Latino Americans shares their story, revealing the personal struggles and successes of immigrants, poets, soldiers, and others who have made an impact on history.

Author and acclaimed journalist Ray Suarez explores the lives of Latino American men and women across a five-hundred-year span, encompassing an epic range of experiences from the early European settlements to Manifest Destiny; the Wild West to the Cold War; the Great Depression to Globalization; and the Spanish-American War to the Civil Rights movement.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This companion book for the PBS series of the same name also stands on its own as a source of valuable information about this large, and growing, group of Americans. . . . [Suarez] does a terrific job. . . . [He] succeeds in his stated goal of getting listeners to think differently about this country and to appreciate the Latino contributions to our history.”
AudioFile

“Suarez . . . reads with passion about his subject. Recommended to fans of the documentary series or those looking for a powerful overview of Latino Americans’ substantial contribution to American history.”
Library Journal

Library Journal - Audio
12/01/2013
PBS Newshour senior correspondent Suarez wrote and performed this ambitious audio companion to the eponymous documentary series. The encyclopedic narrative covers 500 years of Latino American historical figures, from early explorers to modern-day personages. Suarez weaves the story of the Latino community's rise and struggle into the larger American narrative through broad trend descriptions as well as intimate portraits of individuals. His chronological approach is comprehensive but can make the narrative sound like a textbook. Suarez is a competent narrator and reads with passion about his subject. VERDICT Recommended to fans of the documentary series or those looking for a powerful overview of Latino Americans' substantial contribution to American history.—Mark John Swails, Johnson Cty. Community Coll., Overland Park, KS
Kirkus Reviews
An earnest, informative companion to the PBS series on the largest and fastest-growing minority in the United States: Latinos, now numbering more than 50 million. Journalist and PBS commentator Suarez (The Holy Vote: The Politics of Faith in America, 2006) notes that, among nations, only Mexico contains more Hispanics than the U.S. "At some point in the 2040s," writes the author, "a slim majority of Americans will trace their ancestry to people who arrived in this country from someplace other than Europe." Beginning in the 17th century, Suarez reminds readers that when Englishmen arrived at Massachusetts and Virginia to settle or look for riches while despoiling and killing Indians, Spaniards and colonists from Mexico had been doing the same for 50 years in Florida and the Southwest. After a review of Spanish New World exploration and capsule histories of Mexico, Cuba and Puerto Rico that emphasize their usually painful relations to the U.S., Suarez concentrates on America's Latino legacy from the 19th century to the present. Two themes predominate: racism and immigration. Although not as murderous as that against blacks, discrimination against Latinos has an equally long and troubled history that turns out to be no less true for white America's fear of being overwhelmed with Hispanics pouring across our border. True to TV documentary format, Suarez includes the story of an individual with every section. Few will be familiar, yet many should be--e.g., José Martí, the hero of Cuban independence, or Juan de Oñate, founder of the first white settlement in the Southwest. Matters improve greatly as the author approaches the present day and points with pride to famous Latinos from Desi Arnez to Albert Pujols. More journalistic guide than history, the book provides a satisfying antidote to average readers' disturbing ignorance of America's Hispanic heritage.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781622312542
Publisher:
HighBridge Company
Publication date:
09/03/2013
Edition description:
Unabridged; 9.5 hours
Pages:
570
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 5.90(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Broadcast journalist RAY SUAREZ is a senior correspondent for PBS NewsHour, and host of the public radio show America Abroad. He has also been host of Talk of the Nation on NPR and a correspondent for CNN.

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Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
K
HenryBeemis More than 1 year ago
This book should not be referred to as history. There are no citations and there is no index. It may be considered a book of anecdotes at best. The appearances of Desi Arnaz and Freddie Printz on television shows of the era are a poor measurement of progress for Latinos. Cesar Chavez and his efforts should be highly commended by all......................Even though the book is a companion to the television documentary it should stand alone on its merits, it does not.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has technical format problems. The Nook reader hangs up when I get to a new chapter and it requires fiddling to regain control and then going directly to the chapter from the contents. Suarez writes a history of Latino Americans that is a combination of historical facts and personal stories. Put together, it is an important part of the US history highlighting the ugly ethnic discrimination that is part of human nature. At times, it made me sad and angry; then I came back to realize that it is just homo sapiens at its worst. Two bones to pick: It drags at times and I had to force myself to continue reading; and it fails to fully acknowledge and describe one more reason for migration to the US: looking to be able to exercise basic civil rights, such as freedom of sexual orientation expression. Sadly, this motivator, like the economic motivator are becoming less relevant or worse, reversed. Gay marriages were legal in Mexico City before California and the economic downturn has reversed the migration between the US and Mexico as Suarez properly point out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You a boy or girl
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not interested