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Laughing Boy
     

Laughing Boy

3.6 3
by Oliver La Farge
 

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This Pulitzer Prize-winning novel captures the essence of the Southwest in the early 1900s-and depicts a young Native American couple experiencing all the uncertainties and joys of first love. Laughing Boy is one of the most powerful novels in American fiction.

"Lucid beauty, vital artistic imagination, and a clear, almost hypnotic style."-New York

Overview

This Pulitzer Prize-winning novel captures the essence of the Southwest in the early 1900s-and depicts a young Native American couple experiencing all the uncertainties and joys of first love. Laughing Boy is one of the most powerful novels in American fiction.

"Lucid beauty, vital artistic imagination, and a clear, almost hypnotic style."-New York Times

"Daring...triumphantly successful!"-Owen Wister, author of The Virginian

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451524676
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/01/1971
Series:
Signet Classics Series
Edition description:
REISSUE
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
4.28(w) x 6.86(h) x 0.54(d)
Lexile:
810L (what's this?)
Age Range:
15 - 17 Years

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Laughing Boy: A Navajo Love Story 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Where you live decides the way you live. In Oliver La Farge's novel 'Laughing Boy,' the differences between the Indian land and the white man's town are literally the differences between life and death. They are two separate ways of life, and cannot successfully be combined.

Laughing Boy is the ideal Indian, but he falls in love with Slim Girl, a 'school-girl,' and moves to the white man's town. While he is there, he becomes an alcoholic, loses the holy way of life, shoots someone and becomes hunted by the white man. La Farge indirectly draws attention to the fact that if Laughing Boy had stayed on the Indian land, he would still be living the holy life and would not be hunted by any white man.

Setting plays a huge part in who each person is. Where we live decides who we are by influence. Laughing Boy is an Indian, and should have stayed with his people, Slim Girl is a school girl and should have stayed with the white man. Had they both stayed where God had put them, neither would have been hurt, or touched by sorrow and death.