Law, Decision-Making, And Microcomputers

Overview

The rise of microcomputers and the power that they've brought have revolutionized nearly every professional discipline, not the least of which is the field of law. This work presents a survey of microcomputers and decision-aiding software in law practices and the legal process, offering a variety of perspectives from contributors around the world. The book defines decision-making software as having the ability to aid in the processing of a set of law-related alternatives, relative criteria, or rules for ...

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Overview

The rise of microcomputers and the power that they've brought have revolutionized nearly every professional discipline, not the least of which is the field of law. This work presents a survey of microcomputers and decision-aiding software in law practices and the legal process, offering a variety of perspectives from contributors around the world. The book defines decision-making software as having the ability to aid in the processing of a set of law-related alternatives, relative criteria, or rules for determining which alternative should or will be chosen and the relationship between each alternative and criterion. These basic ideas are applied to the work of various members of the legal community, including practicing lawyers, legal policy-makers, and legal scholars.

Following a detailed introduction that provides an overview of the nature, trends, and costs/benefits of decision-making software, the book focuses on the different members of the legal community and the normative and predictive questions that microcomputers and software can help to answer. Part One deals with the practicing lawyer, who must decide whether to go to trial or settle out of court, and predicts the outcome of going to trial or the effects of alternative contract clauses. The legal policymaker, who must decide among alternative statutes and predict the effect of legal policy, is addressed in Part Two. Topics of discussion here include the role of computers in federal tax compliance and using computers to assist in sentencing. Part Three examines the legal scholar and law training, covering subjects such as the American legal computer education and using microcomputers in case-method teaching. Finally, Part Four provides analyses that cut across all three parts of the legal profession, with special concentration on legal prescription and prediction that apply to a wide variety of legal fields, countries, and purposes of the law. This volume will be of particular interest to practicing lawyers in government and private practice, law professors and students, and legal researchers and librarians. Public, academic, and law libraries will also find it to be a valuable addition to their collections.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780899305035
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/1991
  • Pages: 378
  • Lexile: 1530L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Meet the Author

STUART S. NAGEL is professor of political science at the University of Illinois, and the publications coordinator of the Policy Studies Organization.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Decision-Aiding Software and the Law

The Practicing Lawyer

Information Retrieval Research: How It Might Affect the Practicing Lawyer by Alan Smeaton

Expert Systems--Lawyers Beware! by Ronald Stamper

Repercussions of Computer Technology on United States Law and Lawyers by James V. Vergari

Practical Applications of Document Assembly Systems by Ronald W. Staudt

Microcomputers, Decision-making and Case Evaluation by Richard Graham

The Legal Policymaker and Public Sector Uses

The Growing Role of Computers in American Federal Tax Compliance and Administration by William J. Turnier

Computerization in the Prosecution Service in Scotland by Robert G. Donaldson

A Computer System to Assist in Sentencing Convicted Offenders by David I. Bainbridge

The Courthouse of the Future by George Nicholson

The Legal Scholar and Law Training

Courses on Computers and Law in American Law Schools by Sanda Erdelez and Paul M. Hillman

Using Microcomputers in Case-Method Law Teaching by Stuart S. Nagel

The LEXICAL System for Computer-Aided Legal Instruction by Philip Leith

A Hypertext System for Teaching Legal Research by I. Trotter Hardy

The Computer in American Legal Education by Donald T. Trautman

Cross-Cutting Analyses of the Law

Implementation of Expert Systems as an Aid to Legal Decision-Making by Antonio A. Martino

Automatic Generation of a Legal Expert System by Layman E. Allen and Charles Saxon

Thes-Maker: A Tool for Legal Thesaurus Building by Constantino Ciampi

The Problem of Finding a Precedent by Jon Bing

Computers in Legal Decision-Making by David I. Bainbridge

Bibliography

Index

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