Law Library Collection Development in the Digital Age

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Overview

While the digital revolution has touched every aspect of law librarianship, perhaps nowhere has the effect been more profound than in the area of collection development. Many of the materials law libraries traditionally collected in print form are now available in electronic format.

Digital technology has affected the way we select, order, and process legal materials. The World Wide Web has created an explosion of both commercial and private online publishing. The cost of electronic publishing has caused many traditional law book publishers to sell their companies rather than invest in the needed technologies to compete in the 21st century. Small publishers and book jobbers have been forced to reinvent themselves. The amount of legal information available and its costs continue to soar. Law Library Collection Development in the Digital Age deals with these and other issues related to law library collection development. Chapters range from the theoretical to the practical.

Inspired by Penny Hazleton’s seminal paper “How Much of Your Print Collection is Really on Lexis or Westlaw?” the editors and chapter authors of Law Library Collection Development in the Digital Age endeavor to expand on professor Hazleton’s work, with examinations of:

  • the role of law libraries in strategic planning for distance learning
  • Web mirror sites
  • trust vs. antitrust issues
  • access vs. ownership issues
  • how law libraries deal with electronic court records, dockets, and filings
  • the growth of e-journals as they relate to legal publishing
  • how the Hein Greenslips and Blackwell North America’s Bookservice cover legal materials
  • past, present, and future roles of specialized book jobbers
  • and more!
Anyone interested in law librarianship or the information industry will find this book informative and useful. Make it a part of your professional collection today.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Tapping the expertise of some of the best minds in law librarianship, editors Chiorazzi and Russell, both law library directors and professors of law, have assembled an impressive compilation of essays on the impact of digital publishing on law libraries and their collection development practices. Margaret Maes Axtmann and Edmund Edmonds contribute a chapter on their planning process for the creation of a new law library at St. Thomas School of Law. Claire Germain explores the role of web mirror sites in the dissemination of legal information and discusses recent efforts at Cornell Law Library to make such sites available to researchers for free. Richard Danner, dean and professor of law at Duke University, discusses the growth of distance learning in law schools and its implications for academic law libraries. Other chapters cover access to electronic court records, the role of book jobbers in the future, the use of electronic law journals, copyright, and antitrust issues. This book is essential reading for law librarians, their supervisors, and anyone interested in legal publishing and access to legal information.-Joan Pedzich, Harris Beach LLP, Rochester, NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789020239
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 12/28/2003
  • Pages: 340
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Books, Bytes, Bricks and Bodies: Thinking About Collection Use in Academic Law Libraries 1
Re-Engineering the Law Library Resources Today for Tomorrow's Users: A Response to "How Much of Your Print Collection Is Really on WESTLAW or LEXIS-NEXIS?" 29
Availability of Works Cited in Recent Law Review Articles on LEXIS, Westlaw, the Internet, and Other Databases 55
Strategic Planning for Distance Learning in Legal Education: Initial Thoughts on a Role for Libraries 69
Web Mirror Sites: Creating the Research Library of the Future, and More ... 87
Legal Scholarship and Digital Publishing: Has Anything Changed in the Way We Do Legal Research? 105
Trust v. Antitrust: Consolidation in the Legal Publishing Industry 123
Access versus Ownership: A Changing Model of Intellectual Property 153
A Law Library in the New Century: The Creation of the University of St. Thomas Law Library 177
Electronic Journals in the Academic Law Library - Law Reviews and Beyond 189
Book Selection Services: One Law Library, Two Vendors 259
Changes in the Courthouse-Electronic Records, Filings and Court Dockets: Goals, Issues and the Road Ahead 275
The Changing Role of Law Library Vendors: The William S. Hein & Company Perspective 301
Index 307
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