Lawn Boy Returns

( 57 )

Overview

Gary Paulsen’s funny follow-up to Lawn Boy is full of big surprises and big laughs.
 
Lawn Boy says: The summer I was twelve, mowing lawns with Grandpa’s old riding mower turned into big business. With advice from Arnold the stockbroker, I learned all about making money.
 
Six weeks and hundred of thousands of dollars later, life got more complicated. You see, the ...

See more details below
Paperback
$5.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (21) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $2.97   
  • Used (11) from $1.99   
Lawn Boy Returns

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Gary Paulsen’s funny follow-up to Lawn Boy is full of big surprises and big laughs.
 
Lawn Boy says: The summer I was twelve, mowing lawns with Grandpa’s old riding mower turned into big business. With advice from Arnold the stockbroker, I learned all about making money.
 
Six weeks and hundred of thousands of dollars later, life got more complicated. You see, the prizefighter I sponsor, Joey Pow, won a big fight. And a TV interview made me famous. As Arnold says, “Capitalism plus publicity equals monster commerce.” Even my best friends wanted a piece of the action. Meanwhile, some scary guys showed up at Joey’s gym. . . .
 

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Danielle Williams
Most twelve-year-olds do not spend their days attending business meetings and checking on their employees. Most twelve-year-olds, however, also do not have a business manager with a way with money. Despite the confidence he has in his business manager, Lawn Boy still finds himself subject to the shady dealings of people who want to take advantage of a child and his success in business. But they underestimate him and are forced to reevaluate their strategies when Lawn Boy, his business partners, and his friends quickly get the better of them. Throw in some unwanted publicity and questions about child endangerment from shady lawyers and the results are an action-packed story filled with clever children and funny misadventures. Paulsen's writing is very engaging. The characters he creates are compelling and make it difficult to put the book down. It is possible to read this sequel to Lawn Boy without reading the first book, but several situations might clarified if the books are read in order. Reviewer: Danielle Williams
School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—During the first six weeks of summer, Lawn Boy (2007) went from being an ordinary 12-year-old to a successful business owner and "hundred-thousand-aire." In Gary Paulsen's humorous sequel (2010, both Wendy Lamb Books), Lawn Boy realizes that with wealth comes responsibility. By the middle of July, the young entrepreneur finds himself besieged by lawyers, labor problems, and the IRS. To make things worse, his parents are out of town, his grandmother is threatened by gangsters, and girls keep hanging around his yard wanting his autograph. What is a seventh grade boy to do? Fans of the first book will welcome the return of Lawn Boy's zany friends and family, along with a few new colorful characters. Paulsen pushes the envelope of believability to its most humorous limits as he skillfully weaves wit and wisdom to bring the tale to a satisfying conclusion. Tom Parks recreates Paulsen's memorable characters with unique, recognizable voices. Overall, Parks's performance is entertaining, but sometimes it falls short of the book's comedic potential because he lacks subtlety. His characters speak at about the same pitch and cadence throughout and come across as caricatures rather than real people. Parks sometimes fails to recognize the punch lines of sarcastic comments or understatements. For a humorous story with more authentic teen voices, Tom Angleberger's The Strange Case of the Origami Yoda (Amulet Books, 2010; Recorded Books, 2010) is a good choice.—Donna Cardon, Provo City Library, UT
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553494303
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 4/5/2011
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 100,476
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Gary Paulsen is the distinguished author of many critically acclaimed books for young people. His most recent books are Lawn Boy, The Amazing Life of Birds, Mudshark, and Woods Runner.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Lawn Boy Returns


By Gary Paulsen

Wendy Lamb Books

Copyright © 2010 Gary Paulsen
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780385908993

Paulsen: LAWN BOY RETURNS

1

The Origins of Economic Collapse

I sponsor a great fighter: Joseph Powdermilk, Jr. His nickname is Joey Pow.

My grandmother is the kind of person who always thinks the best of everyone. She’s also very big on family.

So when this guy Zed approached Grandma and Joey at the gym and said, “Hey, Joey! It’s Zed, your second cousin once removed,” Grandma was thrilled.

Joey couldn’t hear what the guy was saying because his ears were still ringing from his sparring partner’s accidental haymaker. Cousin Zed threw his arm around the still-reeling Joey. “I’m one a yer dad’s stepbrother Sam’s boys from his second or maybe his third marriage. Could be the seventh one, hard ta keep track a Sam, he’s always been what ya call a bad boy, gotta real taste for the ladies.”

Grandma beamed at Joey and Joey got all excited because Grandma looked so happy. Grandma hugged Zed and then Zed hugged Joey, and bam, faster than one of Joey’s knockouts, Zed had weaseled himself into becoming part of Joey’s family.

Over the past few weeks, Grandma and Joey have developed a great and unusual friendship, even though they don’t appear to have much in common. She speaks really fast and he talks really slowly; he’s enormous and powerful, she’s small and gentle. But they’re both early birds, which is great because Joey likes to do his workouts at the gym in the morn- ing and Grandma likes to drink coffee and read the newspaper there to the sound of uppercuts to the chin and body punches.

Grandma’s learned a lot about boxing recently. I walked in on one of Joey’s training sessions the other day and saw her shadowboxing in the corner. She’s been pestering Joey to teach her to feint and jab. Joey likes to have someone look after him, fussing about whether or not he’s getting enough sleep and eating enough fiber and all those other grandmotherly things.

That morning, before Zed appeared, my mom and dad had left town for a few days to look at lakefront property up north; Arnold had told us that investing some of my earnings in land would be a good idea. Grandma was staying at our house to keep an eye on me while they were gone, so after Joey’s workout she brought Joey and Zed back to my house.

Zed’s broken-down pickup truck towed an ancient camper. He parked next to Joey’s old station wagon in our driveway.

Grandma is amazing and fun, but there are times when she makes no sense. Still, if you think really hard, you can usually figure out what she means. When she said, “I have always despised the taste and texture of olives,” and gestured to this dirty, hairy Zed person as he climbed out of his truck, I couldn’t figure out what Zed and olives had in common, but I got a bad feeling.

I think I have a good sense of whether or not a person can be trusted. For instance, I knew right off the bat that Arnold, my stockbroker, and Pasqual, my lawn-mowing business partner, were good guys. And even though Joey Pow is large and slightly terrifying in appearance, I appreciated his good qualities immediately.

I didn’t get the same vibe from Zed.

“Good ta meetcha.” Zed stuck his hand out and I forced myself to shake his grubby paw. “Yer granny tol’ me how ya sponsor Joey.”

“I did?” Grandma looked a little perplexed. “Oh well, it’s like I always say: people who are cut from the same cloth can’t see the forest for the trees.”

“I know a little somethin’ about the boxin’ biz.” Zed threw a few fake punches and zipped his feet back and forth like he was bobbing and weaving to avoid an opponent in the ring.

Grandma beamed at him. Joey wasn’t paying any attention; he was petting the neighbor’s cat. Next to the cat, Joey looked, as always, ginormous.

I turned back to Zed, who had made himself comfortable in my mother’s lawn chair. He leaned back, farted once, burped twice and gave a mighty scratch in an area most parents urge toddlers not to touch in public. Charming. I moved upwind once I caught a whiff of him.

“So, uh, where do you live?” I asked.

“Oh, ya know, here ’n’ there. I was passin’ through town and heard about my cuz Joey from a buddy.”

“Uh-huh. What, exactly, did you hear?”

“I heard Joey’s gettin’ ready for a big fight. Bruiser Bulk—ain’t he the Upper Midwest heavyweight champ? From what I hear, Joey’s got a shot at takin’ the title.”

I looked over at Grandma and Joey. She’d put her hands up in front of her face and Joey was, very gently, tapping them with loose fists as she taunted him. “Is that all you’ve got? C’mon, let’s see some speed and power.” Never mind that if Joey so much as flicked her with his forefinger and thumb, he’d propel her into next week.

I looked back at Zed, who had been studying me with the same look that I see in the neighbor’s cat’s eyes when she watches baby birds learning to fly.

“I heard how ya got stinkin’ rich this summer.” Zed smiled, and I got a chill down my spine when I saw his teeth. They looked like he’d sharpened them with a file.

I thought: I’m not the only one who needs someone to keep an eye on them for the next few days.

“So, what do you do for a living?” I asked.

“Oh, ya know, this ’n’ that. I’m between jobs now an’ it seems to me Joey could use a good corner man, and who’s better to have on yer side than fam’ly? Plus I don’t go all squeamish at the sighta blood ’n’ guts.”

Uh-huh.

“Hey, bud.” Zed looked around and nodded. “Ya got a nice spread. Figger I can park my rig here? The parkin’ lot at Joey’s place don’t have much room.”

“You could, um, probably stay here while you’re in town. For a few days. I guess. Because Joey’s real busy getting ready for the fight.” And I’d rather have you where I can see you, I silently finished. Looking out for Joey’s interests was part of my sponsorship responsibilities.

“That’s real sportin’ of ya, pal, don’t mind if I do.” Zed looked way too happy about the chance to park in our driveway.

I broke up Grandma and Joey’s boxing lesson. “Zed’s going to park here for a few days.” Grandma didn’t seem to be bothered that we had just brought down the property values of the entire neighborhood by offering to host this rusted-out piece of garbage. Meanwhile, Joey helped Zed plug in the world’s longest extension cord from his camper to our garage.

Then Joey took off for his midmorning train- ing session (not to be confused with his early- morning workout and, of course, nothing like his late-morning weight lifting). Grandma went inside to rest her eyes (that’s what she calls taking a nap), and Zed—after blowing his nose without using a tissue, sending a snot rocket onto the perfectly mowed lawn—thumped up the step into his “rig” and started to fry up some roadkill he’d scraped off the interstate. At least that’s how it smelled.

And that was how the bad part started.


From the Hardcover edition.

Continues...

Excerpted from Lawn Boy Returns by Gary Paulsen Copyright © 2010 by Gary Paulsen. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 57 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(44)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 58 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 23, 2011

    Lawn Boy

    I've recently reas Lawn Boy, the first book and ended up loving it! It's full of humor and suspense i was stuck in a page turning frenzy. I highly recomend this book to all kidsfrom 6th grade and above. I hope everyone reads this book!

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 28, 2011

    Great

    I bought this on my new nook because i read Lawn Boy and Lawn Boy is awesome.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2012

    Awesome

    I loved this book. It a great follow up from the first book. Overall this book is awesome.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 27, 2010

    Lawn boy Returns

    I think that this book is very interesting.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Warning

    THE MAFIA.
    *****************
    (-(-(-(-(• •)-)-)-)-)
    ******************
    THEY ARE WATCHING YOU.
    NOBODY KNOWS WHERE THEY WILL STRIKE NEXT.
    ********************************************
    HIDE YOUR CHILDREN.

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    Great book

    Read it every day! I would recommend it to people who have read the first book.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2011

    AMAZING!

    This book teaches you all about money stocks and bonds. This book i would recomend it to kids 10 and up.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 28, 2011

    it is asome

    it is a grate book for kids 10+. it is funny and cool also i like this book becuase i like money so if you like money this us the book for you.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2011

    love it!!

    this biook is awesome

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2011

    read it

    i thought this book was good but u should read the return.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2013

    Awesome

    Awesome book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2013

    Bad

    Very bad

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2013

    I realy like this.

    You should read #1

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    Anonymous

    LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2013

    Lawn boy returns

    Amazing book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2013

    Goob book

    This was one of my faviort books

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2013

    warthog

    funniest book. The boys grandma is so funny and so is what his boxer does to some guys. HILARIOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Id say its great.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2012

    Like it alot :)

    I read the first one for readers rally at my school and now we r reading it in my social studies class so i thought i might read this one while i read the first one :) love the series, great books for all ages, definently a great buy.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2012

    Awesome

    Very good book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2012

    Lawn boy

    Great book

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 58 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)