Lays of Ancient Rome [With ATOC] [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Lays of Ancient Rome (1842) is a once-famous collection of four lays (short narrative poems) by Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859) describing semi-mythical heroic episodes in Roman history with strong dramatic and tragic themes. To them are added two poems dealing with more recent European history, "Ivry" (1824) and "The Armada" (1832).

The poems were composed by Lord Macaulay during his spare time ...
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Lays of Ancient Rome [With ATOC]

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Overview

The Lays of Ancient Rome (1842) is a once-famous collection of four lays (short narrative poems) by Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-1859) describing semi-mythical heroic episodes in Roman history with strong dramatic and tragic themes. To them are added two poems dealing with more recent European history, "Ivry" (1824) and "The Armada" (1832).

The poems were composed by Lord Macaulay during his spare time whilst he was the "legal member" of the Governor-General of India's Supreme Council (1834–1838). He wrote about them:
"The plan occurred to me in the jungle at the foot of the Neilgherry hills; and most of the verses were made during a dreary sojorn at Ootacamund and a disagreeable voyage in the Bay of Bengal."
The Roman ballads have short but learned introductions discussing the legends and justifying the poems as being like ballads that might have been sung in ancient Roman times.
The Lays were originally published by Longmans in 1842; they became immensely popular in Victorian times, and were a popular subject for recitation, a common pastime of the era. They were set reading in British public schools for more than a hundred years. Winston Churchill memorised them when at Harrow School, to show that, his academic performance notwithstanding, he was capable of certain mental prodigies.


Contents

Horatius

The Battle of the Lake Regillus

Virginia

The Prophecy of Capys
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013393806
  • Publisher: Ladislav Deczi
  • Publication date: 9/20/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 147
  • File size: 295 KB

Meet the Author

Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay PC (25 October 1800 – 28 December 1859) was a British poet, historian and Whig politician. He wrote extensively as an essayist and reviewer, and on British history. He also held political office as Secretary at War between 1839 and 1841 and Paymaster-General between 1846 and 1848.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2013

    Great book!

    I gave it four stars for being slow to start and hard to understand, but a good book!

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