Le Morte D'Arthur (Volume 2)

Le Morte D'Arthur (Volume 2)

3.8 24
by Thomas Malory
     
 

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This volume includes books X through XXI, plus the glossary, of the Professor Rhys edition of "Le Morte d'Arthur."

Overview

This volume includes books X through XXI, plus the glossary, of the Professor Rhys edition of "Le Morte d'Arthur."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781434470966
Publisher:
Wildside Press
Publication date:
05/30/2008
Pages:
412
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.06(d)

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Le Morte D'Arthur 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Joel_M More than 1 year ago
This is not the "prettied up" Victorian (or later) King Arthur full of justice and nobility...at least not by current standards of justice and nobility. This is the story of King Arthur and his knights as translated/adapted/compiled (mostly from much older French manuscripts) by Sir Thomas Malory during the chaotic days of the Wars of the Roses. Most of the main characters are deeply flawed. This is even true of Arthur who spends most of his "screen time" being manipulated by either Merlin or Sir Gawain. The main character traits which get someone labeled as a "noble/worshipful knight" seem to be: 1. He fights well 2. He fights fairly 3. He speaks courteously 4. He is of noble birth Possess these four characteristics and just about anything else can be overlooked (the occasional rape, murder, adultery, etc.). Malory does not seem to comment one way or the other on this morality other than in the quest for the Sangreal where only the three (mostly) sinless (and virgin) knights are acceptable to God. I found the main story arcs interesting, but most of the minor events of which they were composed were repetitive in the extreme. Each story arc was a series of episodes most of which involved the protagonist fighting other random knights at battles, tournaments, or in single combat; sometimes to right a wrong, sometimes just for the sake of fighting. These encounters are all described using the same dozen or so stock phrases. This is a common device in older writing, I think, but it becomes quite tedious after a while. In my opinion, the last third of the book was much more interesting than the preceding 600 or so pages. It described the quest for the Sangreal and the events which led up to the death of Arthur in a much more cohesive manner than the other stories (the story of Sir Tristram and La Beal Isoud which takes up the middle third of the book was especially fragmentary). I would definitely recommend this book to fans of the Arthurian mythos as being closer to the source material than modern retellings, but I do not know whether the average reader would enjoy it or not.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I ordered this book to simply have a bare bones edition until the Norton critical edition is published this fall. It arrived today and I am disappointed to find that it will not meet my needs. Baines states in the preface: 'the purpose of this book is to proivide a concise and lucid rendering of Le Morte d'Arthur in modern idiom for the benefit of those 'students and general readers who wish to obtain a firm grasp of the whole, but lack the time and enthusiasm necessary to perform this task for themselves' and that 'my procedure throughout has been to retell each tale 'in my own words''. If you are looking to do any scholarly work, this translation may not meets your needs either. I can't speak to the effectiveness of the translation for the general reader as I will not be reading it. It would have been nice if Barnes & Noble had included this bit of information about the translation in their description of this edition.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She concentrated with her eyes closed. When she opened them she had three different snowballs in the air. Chuckling she pelted them at Neveren.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The sky is cloudless and the moon is but a slender cresent in the deep darkness. Stars twinkle and shine above, and, on occasion, a shy comet may be seen. With a beautiful night sky comes the bite of cold, however. The temperature has dropped to nearly freezing and the dew turns to pale frost. Thin particles of ice begin to form on the bank of the lake which oozes warm steam into the frigid air. <p> ~ Sunset Scarlet
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It may be free, but this is not the version for you!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whatever this book was, its nothing but computer gibberish now
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kinda confuing book....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sub par.