Leader of the Pack (Andy Carpenter Series #10)

( 36 )

Overview

Over the course of his legal career, Andy Carpenter has lost a few cases. But that doesn’t mean he forgets his clients. Andy has always been convinced that Joey Desimone, a man convicted of murder nine years ago, was innocent and believes that Joey’s family’s connections to organized crime played a pivotal role in his conviction. While there isn’t much Andy can do for him while he serves out his prison sentence, Joey suggests that he check up on Joey’s elderly uncle. He’d rather not, but as a favor to Joey, Andy ...

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Leader of the Pack (Andy Carpenter Series #10)

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Overview

Over the course of his legal career, Andy Carpenter has lost a few cases. But that doesn’t mean he forgets his clients. Andy has always been convinced that Joey Desimone, a man convicted of murder nine years ago, was innocent and believes that Joey’s family’s connections to organized crime played a pivotal role in his conviction. While there isn’t much Andy can do for him while he serves out his prison sentence, Joey suggests that he check up on Joey’s elderly uncle. He’d rather not, but as a favor to Joey, Andy agrees to take his dog, Tara, on a few visits.

The old man’s memory is going, but when Andy tries to explain why he’s there, it jogs something in the man’s mind, and his comments leave Andy wondering if Uncle Nick is confused, or if he just might hold the key to Joey’s freedom after all this time.

Andy grabs on to this thread of possibility and follows it into a world where the oath of silence is stronger than blood ties, and where people will do anything to make sure their secrets are kept.

Riveting, suspenseful, and highly entertaining, Leader of the Pack is bestseller David Rosenfelt’s latest entry in his much-beloved Andy Carpenter series.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Rosenfelt walks a line between pulse-pounding suspense and laugh-out-loud humor. . .One of the best in the business.”

—Associated Press on One Dog Night

“A blessed anomaly in crime fiction. . .Andy is like a gulp of cold water on a steamy day. . .Rosenfelt peels back the layers of puzzlement ever so skillfully, tantalizing us throughout until, finally, both Andy and the reader are enlightened, simultaneously. A gem.”

Booklist (starred review) on One Dog Night

“Winning. . .Andy does his usual sterling—and amusing—performance in the courtroom. . .[It] will keep readers turning the pages.”

Publishers Weekly on One Dog Night

“Heartwarming to dog lovers, absorbing to fans ofcourtroom byplay.”

Kirkus Reviews on One Dog Night

“Readers who enjoy a juicy courtroom mystery like the best of Perry Mason will find welcome surroundings in "Dog Tags." What sets Rosenfelt apart from his legal compatriots is an underlining sense of laugh-out-loud humor mixed with suspense. . .Rosenfelt's love of furry friends shines in the story, creating a read that will appeal to the pet lover in everyone.”

—Associated Press on Dog Tags

“Terrific legal thriller. . .Andy Carpenter [is] one of the most engaging legal minds in mystery. . .I was captivated.”

The Globe and Mail on Dog Tags

"A funny, warm-hearted mystery, NEW TRICKS moves quickly and playfully - almost puppylike-through mounting crimes, a long-distance love affair and a secret science project that threatens to thwart [Andy] Carpenter's best efforts. Three Stars."

People on New Tricks

"Rosenfelt concocts a taut thriller full of whiplash plot twists and wisecracking dialogue. . .proving that he's long since earned his crime-novelist pedigree."

Entertainment Weekly on Play Dead

 

Library Journal
Lawyer Andy Carpenter (Dog Tags) is back reinvestigating a case he lost. He believes that his client Joey Desimone, now serving a life sentence in prison for murder, is innocent. The problem is that Joey is the son of a local Mafia don. Joey asks Andy to visit Joey's elderly uncle with Tara, his golden retriever. As always, Tara connects with the uncle, a former mob enforcer whose mental faculties are declining, but the uncle makes some statements that might hold clues to Joey's freedom. Nothing if not persistent, Andy follows that thread into a violent and troubled world. VERDICT Rosenfelt writes with sarcasm and a self-deprecating humor that is hard to resist. Although dogs take a backseat to the story, the author takes the suspense up a notch, and the riveting plot won't disappoint fans.—Susan Hayes, Chattahoochee Valley Libs., Columbus, GA
Kirkus Reviews
Dog-loving Andy Carpenter, Paterson, New Jersey's gift to the criminal bar, gets another chance at a murder case he lost six years earlier. Not even Joey Desimone disputes that his father, Carmine, runs one of central New Jersey's dominant crime families, or that Joey carried on an adulterous affair with Karen Solarno, or that he was angry and hurt when she broke it off to give her marriage another shot. But Joey vigorously disputed prosecutor Dylan Campbell's accusation that he rang the Solarnos' doorbell and gunned down Karen and her husband, Richard. Despite Andy's best efforts, Joey's story didn't sway a jury of his peers, and he's already done six years of his life sentence when Andy, following an unwitting tip he's gotten from Carmine's aging brother and enforcer Nicky Fats, realizes that Richard Solarno was up to his gizzard in gunrunning and that a group of his clients, paramilitary survivalists who deemed a shipment he supplied short on firepower, had threatened his life--facts that Lt. Kyle Wagner of the Montana State Police not only knew, but duly reported to Dylan Campbell six years ago. Even Henry "Hatchet" Henderson, the irascible judge who seems to preside over all Andy's trials (Dog Tags, 2010, etc.), acknowledges that the prosecution's concealment of such exculpatory evidence constitutes grounds for a new trial. If only the trail weren't so cold--and cooling further every day, thanks to the executions of Nicky Fats, Carmine and associates as far away as Peru at the hands of Simon Ryerson, a Harvard MBA who thinks the time is ripe for a hostile takeover of the Desimone empire and doesn't mind stepping on Joey's toes in order to close the deal. The mob intrigue, as is customary with Rosenfelt (On Borrowed Time, 2011, etc.), is unconvincing, and, despite the title, there's not much for dog fanciers this time around. But Andy is as effervescent as ever, and the courtroom byplay is consistently entertaining.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781410453129
  • Publisher: Gale Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 12/26/2012
  • Series: Andy Carpenter Series , #10
  • Edition description: Large Print
  • Pages: 507
  • Sales rank: 1,059,721
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 5.80 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

DAVID ROSENFELT is the Edgar and Shamus Award-nominated author of four stand-alones and nine previous Andy Carpenter novels, most recently One Dog Night. He and his wife live in Maine with the twenty seven golden retrievers that they’ve rescued.

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Read an Excerpt

 

 

By the time Peyton Manning threw the pass, Richard Solarno was dead.

When Richard got up to answer the doorbell, Manning was directing the Colts in the no-huddle offense. Consistent with his style of play, Manning surveyed the defense while at the line of scrimmage, calling audibles based on what he saw before him.

As was often the case, Manning could do this for at least twenty-five or thirty seconds, until the play clock was about to run out.

Since Solarno had bet a lot of money on the Colts, and they were down by four on the Patriots’ eighteen-yard line with thirty seconds to play, he wasn’t happy about leaving the television at all. Chances are it was just a deliveryman, and he could deal with it and be back without missing a play. At least that’s what he hoped.

That’s not how it worked out. He opened the door, and managed to get out the words “what are you” before the bullet hit him in the chest, sending him falling backward.

There was a silencer on the gun, so the killer knew that no neighbors were calling 911. Solarno was technically still alive when he hit the floor, but likely dead by the time Manning threw the interception, effectively costing the Colts the game. But that was no longer Solarno’s problem; he wouldn’t be paying bookmakers ever again.

The killer heard a noise from the top of the stairs, so he entered the house, closing the door behind him. He then headed straight up the stairs, and within three minutes ended the life of Richard’s wife, Karen, as well.

That had not been part of the plan, but it had to be done.

“So, what’s on tap for today?”

Laurie’s question, while seemingly innocuous, represents something of a problem, because my “tap” for today is not something she is likely to approve of.

“Well, I’m going to take Tara for a walk. Then I’m going to run over to the market for some beer, be back here by noon for the NFL pregame shows. I’ll call my bookie, Jimmy Rollins, at twelve thirty to bet the games; then I’ll order a pizza. At one I’ll watch the Giants-Redskins game, switching to other games during time-outs.

“Then, at four, it’ll be mostly San Diego against the Jets, again switching where necessary. That takes me to seven, when I’m hoping you’ll have dinner ready. From eight thirty to eleven thirty tonight is Dallas-Philadelphia on NBC; then, if I’m lucky, you’ll be in the mood for some sexual frolicking from eleven thirty until midnight.”

That is what I would say if I had any semblance of courage or honesty, but since I don’t, I opt for, “I haven’t really done a tap check for today yet, but I’m sure I’ll come up with something productive. Every day is a chance for a new adventure.”

“Then let me guess,” she says. “You’re going to take Tara for a walk, get some beer, place some bets, order a pizza, and watch football all day.”

“You make it sound really appealing,” I say. “How did you come up with all that?”

“It’s exactly what you did yesterday.”

I snap my fingers. “I knew it sounded familiar. But yesterday was college football, today is pro. Apples and oranges.”

“You’re incorrigible.”

“Actually, I’m partially corrigible. I’m not watching football tomorrow at all during the day.”

“What about Monday-night football?”

“That’s not during the day; it’s at night. Hence the name. Oh, and I’m making the prison rounds Tuesday and Wednesday.” Laurie knows what that means; I visit former clients of mine who were found guilty at trial and are in prison. I don’t want them to think they’ve been forgotten.

“So what do you have on tap for today?” I ask, trying to pull the old switcheroo.

“I’m going running, then a spinning class, then Pilates, and then this afternoon I’m volunteering at the hospital.”

“You know, I can’t decide which of those things sounds the most awful.”

“I’ve got an idea, Andy.”

Uh, oh. Laurie’s ideas often involve my expending energy by actually doing things, and today I really just want to plant myself in front of the large-screen TV in the den. I’m so looking forward to total relaxation that I bought a bag of already-popped popcorn so I don’t have to deal with the microwave.

“I hope it’s a long-range, down-the-road, futuristic kind of idea, because we’re talking Giants-Redskins,” I say.

“Well, it might be a way for you to really do something productive, something that you would also enjoy.” She quickly adds, “But definitely not today; I understand we’re talking Giants-Redskins.”

My name, Andy Carpenter, is listed under “Attorneys” in the phone book, assuming phone books still exist. But since my desire to work is really low, and my bank account is really high, I haven’t taken on any clients in almost six months, so I’m a little leery about what Laurie might be driving at.

“As long as what you’re going to suggest doesn’t include judges, courthouses, depositions, or briefs, and if I can bring Tara, I’m all ears,” I say.

“It doesn’t include any of those things, and Tara’s actually the key to it.”

I relax the cringe I’ve been doing since the conversation began. Tara is my best friend, right up there with Laurie. She is also a golden retriever, the greatest one on Earth. My interest is officially piqued.

She continues, “I think you should take Tara to the hospital as a therapy dog.”

This could be worse, but it ain’t great. I know a little bit about the therapy dog process, and while I think it’s a great thing to do, it’s especially great for other people to do, with other people’s dogs.

I can’t speak, or bark, for Tara, but I’m not anxious to start spending time in hospitals.

“Doesn’t Tara need some special training for that?” I ask.

She shakes her head. “Not this one; I’ve checked it out. All they require is a mellow disposition and friendliness on the part of the dog, plus human compassion. Tara is mellow and friendly, and she has enough of the human compassion part for both of you.”

“Sounds great. But there must be a huge waiting list for something like that. I don’t want to cut in line.”

Laurie shakes her head. “Nope.”

“And I suppose you’ve already talked about it with Tara?”

She nods. “She was quite enthusiastic about it.”

I look over at Tara, who does in fact seem fine with everything, and doesn’t appear surprised. This has all the earmarks of a setup.

I’m not going to win this, so I might as well try to make it pay off. “How is this going to impact my life sexually?” I ask.

Laurie smiles. “I find the prospect of you doing this to be very erotic.”

I return the smile. “My cup of human compassion runneth over.”

If I hadn’t seen it, I wouldn’t have believed it.

I’ve been in the hospital room occupied by the very frail Mrs. Harriet Marshall for thirty-five minutes. When I got here, she seemed barely awake, and her mumbling speech was impossible to understand.

I told her who I was, and she showed no reaction whatsoever. I could have told her the room was on fire and I wouldn’t have gotten a response. She was depressed, numbed, and mostly lifeless, sort of how I felt after the Redskins beat the Giants yesterday.

She had absolutely no interest in me, had nothing to say to me, and barely acknowledged my existence. In terms of dealing with females, it felt like I was back in high school.

Then Tara walked over to her, and everything changed. It took three or four minutes, during which Tara sniffed her and put her nose against her arm.

Harriet resisted, until Tara pulled out the big move … the combination “lean-against nuzzle, with a slight lick and an adoring glance.” In dog-land the move has a degree of difficulty of nine point seven, and as far as I know, there is no known defense against it.

So within five minutes Harriet was petting Tara with both hands. She was using a “reverse pet,” which means she would stroke her head from front to back, and then from back to front. I know from personal experience that Tara is not a huge fan of that, but she was graciously allowing Harriet to do it.

The transformation has been amazing. Harriet went from silent and sullen to outgoing and borderline gregarious. In fact, I don’t think I could shut her up if I wanted to, which I don’t.

First, all she wanted to talk about was Tara, asking where I got her and whether she was always this sweet. I told her that I got her from an animal shelter seven years ago when she was two years old.

“So she’s only nine now?” she asked.

Unfortunately, “only” is not the appropriate word. Nine years is starting to get up there for a golden. “Yes,” I said, “though in dog years that’s fifty-two,” I said. Many people think that each year a dog lives counts as seven, but that’s not the correct way to figure it. The first year counts as twenty-one, and each one thereafter counts as four.

The entire concept would be depressing if not for the fact that Tara is going to live forever.

“Fifty-two? I’ve got stockings older than that.” Then she laughed, and I was immediately glad that I let Laurie talk me into doing this.

She went on to tell me everything about every one of her relatives, and she has about thirty thousand of them. Her granddaughter Cynthia just won a regional spelling bee, but the region was in Seattle, so Harriet was bummed that she didn’t get to go.

“Do you have family around here?” I asked.

“Yes.”

“Do they come to visit?”

She shrugged. “They want to, but I don’t let them. I’m too busy feeling sorry for myself.”

“Because you’re sick?” I didn’t know what was wrong with her, so it was a question I probably shouldn’t have asked.

“Because I’m old, and because things in my body don’t work like they should anymore.” She smiled. “I’m not afraid of death, but dying is going to be a pain in the ass.”

We’ve talked for over an hour, and I really don’t want to leave, but she’s clearly getting tired, so I put Tara’s leash on her to lead her out.

“Will you come back to see me?” Harriet asks.

“Definitely.”

“And you’ll bring Tara?”

“She’ll bring me.”

“I had a dog when I was growing up,” she says. “Her name was Sarah. I remember everything about her.” She laughs. “I can’t remember a single boyfriend; hell, I can’t remember what I had for breakfast today. But I remember everything about Sarah.”

“Dogs are the best,” I say.

She nods and pets Tara’s head for the thousandth time. “And Tara’s the best of the best. Just like Sarah.”

I nod. “Exactly like Sarah.”

The prison up in Rahway is maybe my least favorite place on Earth, with the possible exception of Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia. Actually, the two places remind me of each other. For starters, they’re both enormous, often overcrowded, and serve mediocre food.

Rahway houses murderers and thieves, the lowest of the low, worthy of society’s scorn and revenge. The stadium in Philadelphia houses the Philadelphia Eagles.

Six of one, half a dozen of the other.

I’m heading for the prison, as I promised Laurie, but keeping that promise is not my motivation. I have friends here, friends that rely on me. Unfortunately, relying on me is part of the reason they’re here in the first place.

I’ve had a very successful legal career; you can count the number of cases I’ve lost on one hand. Well, actually it’s more like two or three hands, and a couple of feet. But I know defense attorneys who can’t remember the last time they won a case, and I’m actually on a winning streak.

But the losses bug me, especially in cases where I truly felt the client was innocent.

I’m financially independent now, and therefore able to pick and choose from prospective clients. Mostly I choose not to work at all, but if I do, it’s only because I consider the person innocent of the crime they’re charged with. In my older, poorer days, I didn’t have that luxury, so sometimes I’d wind up with guilty clients, and, more often than not, the jury sealed the deal.

But Joey Desimone was different. He stood accused of the cold-blooded murder of a husband and wife in Montclair. The evidence was clearly against him, and I understood the jury’s finding him guilty, but every instinct I had said he didn’t do it.

Weighing heavily in the jurors’ minds, though they would never admit it and the judge specifically told them not to consider it, was the fact that Joey is the son of Carmine Desimone, the head of an organized crime family in Central Jersey.

Joey was widely thought to have distanced himself from his family’s “occupation,” and I believed then, and still do, that he had nothing to do with the criminal enterprise. But it was a mark against him, as was the fact that Joey was having an affair with the woman who died in the attack, Karen Solarno.

Public outrage at the crime was widespread; I was even castigated for representing him. The jury climbed on the anti-Joey bandwagon and gave him life without the possibility of parole. They would have given him the death penalty, but New Jersey doesn’t have one. Joey’s continuing to live actually became an issue in the next gubernatorial campaign, with one of the candidates pointing to it as a prime reason for a reinstatement of the ultimate punishment.

That candidate lost, and retreated to his previous post on Wall Street. Joey, in the meantime, spends twenty-three of every twenty-four hours sitting in a seven-by-ten-foot cell.

So I visit him. Not that often, maybe three or four times a year, and not for any reason other than to let him know he’s not forgotten. Early on I could see the look of hope on his face that I was bringing him some news that might help get him out of prison, and then the disappointment when that obviously wasn’t the case.

Now we just have easy conversations, friends talking about whatever. He’s managed to keep up to date on the news of the day, especially sports, so the conversation flows smoothly.

I don’t bother asking him how things are in the prison anymore. The answer is always a shrug and “getting by.” I know that he doesn’t get hassled by other inmates, for a few reasons. First of all, he minds his own business. Second, he’s a former Marine who can handle himself as well as anyone in the place.

Third, and by far the most important, everyone knows who his father is. Joey has often told me how distressed his father is that his son is behind bars, and that he was unable to prevent it. He is, however, more than powerful enough to have effectively put the word out that Joey is not to be messed with.

Joey is a football Giants fan, another mark in his favor, but he takes it to a level well past me. I know who the starters are, and am generally aware of their strengths and weaknesses. Joey knows everyone on the roster, including the practice squad, and he can talk at length about any one of them. Which is fine, because when it comes to football talk, I can listen at length.

I mention my experience with Tara, the Therapy Dog, and Joey finds it hilarious. “So you bring a dog right into the hospital? Isn’t that unsanitary or something?”

“Unsanitary? Tara?” I ask. “You start talking trash about Tara and it won’t do you any good to smile when you say it.”

He laughs, apparently not cowed by my threat. “Sorry, but I can’t picture it. The world has changed a lot since I’ve been in here.”

He probably doesn’t know how true that is, but I decide that his comment is not banter material, so I don’t try it. “I doubted it myself, but the first person I did it with, Tara really made her feel better. It’s like she came alive.”

His eyes light up with an idea. “Hey, does the person have to be in a hospital?”

“No, I don’t think so. Could be an old-age home, even in someone’s house. Wherever.”

“Would you try it with my uncle Nick?”

There’s pretty much no favor I wouldn’t grant Joey, but bringing Tara to visit Nick Desimone is pushing it. “Nicky Fats,” as he has been known to the tabloids, his family, his friends, police, and probably most of the people he has killed, has been Carmine Desimone’s right-hand man since Carmine assumed control of the family.

Carmine has been known to be ruthless in stamping out his enemies, a throwback to the days when the accepted mode of operation was to shoot, stab, and club first, and ask questions later. According to the lore, Nicky Fats makes Carmine look like Mary Poppins, and apparently moves with a deadly dexterity that belies his three-hundred-fifty-pound girth.

“You want me to do dog therapy with your uncle Nick?” I try to make my voice sound as incredulous as possible, but I can’t get it to the level that I really feel.

“You don’t want to?” he asks.

“What if Tara sheds on him?”

He laughs again. “What … you think he’ll kill you if she sheds on him?”

“Not necessarily kill, but ‘maim’ and ‘torture’ briefly entered my mind.”

“Don’t worry about it. Shedding would be fine; just don’t have Tara pull a knife on him. But seriously, Andy, he used to call me all the time. Now I talk to him maybe once a month, and he’s not like himself. Really down, you know? And not so sharp anymore. He forgets stuff; sometimes doesn’t make sense. And it’s getting worse.”

In a courtroom, even under tremendous pressure, I can think on my feet and verbally and strategically react to anything that might happen. But in this case, talking about taking a dog to visit an old fat man, I freeze up like a Fudgsicle.

“Sure. Happy to do it,” I say. In terms of level of truthfulness, that statement would rank with something like, “Damn, I’m going to be traveling to Saturn that day to go giraffe hunting.”

“Great. I’ll set it up.”

 

Copyright © 2012 by David Rosenfelt

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 36 )
Rating Distribution

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(28)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 22, 2012

    A Must Read

    David Rosenfelt is a briliant writer of mystery. I love a good mystery, but have a hard time finding many that just grab me. Leader of the Pack is the 10th book in the Andy Carpenter series, but can be enjoyed as a stand alone if you so choose. Andy is a rescuer of Golden Retrivers and lawyer who is well off enough to pick when he takes a case. Leader of the Pack is full of twists and turns to keep you guessing. I was so rivited with the 10th book in the series I will defenantly be starting from the beginning of the Andy Carpenter series, Open and Shut. David Rosenfelt has captured my heart with Leader of the Pack and I now where to turn for my mytery fix.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 1, 2012

    The usual spell-binding Rosenfelt noval.

    Wish Rosenfelt could write more rapidly or didn't sleep. His books leave you wanting more, and more and more.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A reader can always expect two things when reading an Andy Carpe

    A reader can always expect two things when reading an Andy Carpenter novel: a lot of wit and an unanticipated ending. This latest entry in the series is no exception, as the dog-loving attorney pursues a case that has haunted him for six years. Joey Desimone, son of a mafia boss, was convicted of a double murder of which Andy believes him innocent. And almost by mistake, he learns something that sets off his investigation in order to gain a new trial.

    While Andy gets a retrial, he really, as usual, lacks the facts and evidence to prove Joey’s innocence. Meanwhile, during the course of the investigation, this, of course, continues while the trial goes on, he trips over a bigger crime, making for an exciting double-barreled story.

    This book is perhaps the most complicated of the entire series, raising a deep moral issue for the lawyer, which he resolves handily. The humor continues to be light and wholesome, while the cast of familiar characters provides excellent backup to the main protagonist.

    Recommended.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2012

    Recommend

    Have read all of the "Andy Carpenter Series". and will be waiting for his next book. This series is about a lawyer who doesn't really like to work, defending clients he believes innocent, but getting himself in some bad situations trying to get proof. Situations are serious but he has a humorous side. I have read other books by this author that were not part of this series and I have also enjoyed those.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    LOVE IT!

    I have read each one of David Rosenfelts' books and I love them. Andy Carpenter is a great character that isn't perfect but is totally loveable. And I adore Tara. The plots are well thought out and always contain surprises. This is the 10th Andy Carpenter book I've read and I haven't been bored yet. I'm always waiting for the next one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2013

    Flame

    Prowls around jordens encapment

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2013

    Jordan

    *Sets on a cot with his rottweilers, Rosko and Boz.*

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2013

    Fawnkit

    Ok

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2013

    Lilypelt

    Gtg bbt

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2013

    JOIN GREYCLAN

    WE ARE A EVIL CLAN AD HATE BLAZECLAN WE SEND PATROLS DAILY JOIN AT GREY MAN FIRST RESULY

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2013

    GoldenStar to Quickslit

    Hi.. sorry I haven't been on can't find the result we used to talk at..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2012

    ARTIMIS

    Where is my pack?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2012

    IDIOT

    IT'S SPELLED ARTEMIS, NOT ARTIMIS!!!! LEARN TO SPELL!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2012

    Stranded

    Stays some distance away from the others, thinking about how different it is now.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2012

    Incade

    He looks at golden.hey.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2012

    Soul

    Looks at incade.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2012

    Eagle

    Eagle came. "Animal tribe is in lessons. Hurry, to lessobs, first results!"

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2012

    Shiverchrome

    *Rolls eyes*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2012

    Daybreak

    I'm leaving. I might come back in the summer. Might.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2012

    Rockknight

    He walks in a buck in his sharp jaws. He is hauls it over to their food place, drops it there then gets off an antler. He carries the antler back to his den in the 10th result.

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