Leadership by Example: The Ten Key Principles of All Great Leaders [NOOK Book]

Overview

An accessible and inspiring guide to good leadership based on a popular lecture that Dr. Chopra has presented to thousands


Very few of us are leaders all the time, in everything we do, but all of us can become a leader in specific situations. In a committee, in business, at a social club or at a religious institution, we all find a time in our lives when we can lead. Few people set out knowingly to become leaders, rather they see a need and ...

See more details below
Leadership by Example: The Ten Key Principles of All Great Leaders

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

An accessible and inspiring guide to good leadership based on a popular lecture that Dr. Chopra has presented to thousands


Very few of us are leaders all the time, in everything we do, but all of us can become a leader in specific situations. In a committee, in business, at a social club or at a religious institution, we all find a time in our lives when we can lead. Few people set out knowingly to become leaders, rather they see a need and they find a way of dealing with it, and often others choose to follow their example.


Based on a talk that he has given to more than 60,000 people in at least seven countries, the "LEADERSHIP" mnemonic that Dr. C hopra explains is as follows: L - listen well. E - empathy. A - attitude. D - dreams and decisiveness. E - effectiveness. R - resilience. S - a sense of purpose. H - humility and humor. I - integrity and imagination. P - principles, and willingness to pack other people's parachutes. Drawing from his experience as Faculty Dean for Continuing Education for Harvard Medical School as well as the writings and lives of great leaders throughout history, this easy-to-read, inspiring book will serve as a reminder and a guide to becoming leaders in our own lives.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Sanjiv Chopra masterfully weaves threads of wisdom into a wonderful tapestry of inspiration that will energize and motivate the head and heart to action. His book is a must read for those who aspire to attain the highest form of servant leadership."

—Charles R. Denham, Senior Fellow, Harvard Advanced Leadership Initiative; Chairman, TMIT

“In all my years in academic medicine, the most important lecture I have ever had the pleasure of attending was 'The 10 Tenets of Leadership' by Professor Sanjiv Chopra. Now available in hard copy, it is a ‘must read’ that illustrates how we all can be leaders in our own areas of endeavor thereby making the world a much better place.”

—Melvin E. Clouse, MD, Deaconess Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School

"Great leaders may move mountains, but first they must move people — by inspiring and connecting with them. In this engaging book, Dr. Chopra displays an encyclopedic perspective on leadership across cultures and through time. He goes to the heart of leadership to reveal that qualities such as integrity, empathy, humility, and passion are essential for anyone who wants to harness the talents of others to accomplish a shared goal. So too is the ability to listen. Those seeking an inclusive leadership model will discover much value in these pages."

—Dipak C. Jain, Dean of INSEAD

"Thoroughly inspiring and motivating. Challenging the convention that to be a leader you need to have followers, the book very effectively inspires to uncover the greatness in EVERY individual. In an interesting narrative that is loaded with excellent quotes, Dr. Chopra has very clearly laid out the underlying principles that define leaders. I would recommend reading the book over and over again periodically to be constantly reminded of the qualities that each of us can develop to bring out the leader in us."

—Zunaira Munir, Managing Director, Strategize Blue

"Sanjiv Chopra’s book is a layman’s inspiration to leadership. He shows that leadership is not rabble-rousing. It is not just Mark Antony holding forth with the dead body of Caesar by his side. It is a multi-dimensional energy that also requires fever, passion and the will to achieve, whatever one’s vocation. In a truly inspirational style, Sanjiv gently guides you over ten commanding leadership steps. If you can catch the infection of his passion and his fever, leadership will surely come your way. As someone who has had the privilege of leading a 65,000-strong police force of India’s capital city of Delhi, I learnt my leadership skills on the job. I wish Sanjiv’s book was with me in those days." —Vijay Karan, Former Commissioner of Police, Delhi, India; Former Director, Central Bureau of Investigation, India

"Dr. Chopra's book is an guide for future leaders. Among the many important points he makes is the importance of listening. As I have learned, a leader surrounds himself with good people -- not yes men -- and listens to what they have to say. More potential leaders have failed because they were deaf to advice than for any other reason."

—Col. Jack Jacobs (Ret), Medal of Honor recipient and NBC Military Analyst

“Sanjiv Chopra’s book is at once both incredibly engaging and inspiring! I was wonderfully moved by the magical mosaic he weaves using real-life stories of leadership to convey the powerful idea that everyone can be an effective leader. Leadership by Example portrays a nice taxonomical structure to the tapestry that enhances our understanding of the fundamental attributes of leadership. The book is written in a moving story-like fashion and is embellished with a treasure trove of compelling quotes.  This is an all-weather book that you will not be able to put down once you start it!”

—Venkat Srinivasan, CEO, Rage Frameworks, Inc., and Chairman and Founder of English Helper

“A native of India, Chopra draws from a global pantheon of great leaders throughout history, from Buddha to FDR, from Soren Kierkegaard to Gandhi, to illustrate the power of selflessness and idealism. … Chopra’s book is engaging, idealistic and often moving, providing numerous examples of great leaders and ordinary souls who have inspired others to improve society.”

The MetroWest Daily News

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781250013057
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 5/8/2012
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • File size: 352 KB

Meet the Author

DR. SANJIV CHOPRA is Professor of Medicine&Faculty Dean for Continuing Medical Education at Harvard Medical School, and Director of Clinical Hepatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. He has approx 100 publications and 4 specialist books to his credit. He has received numerous awards including the Excellence in Teaching Award from Harvard Medical School. With Dr. Alan Lotvin and David Fisher, he is the author of Live Better, Live Longer. He lives in Weston, Massachusetts.


DAVID FISHER is the author of more than fifteen NEW YORK TIMES bestsellers. He lives in New York.


DR. SANJIV CHOPRA is Professor of Medicine&Faculty Dean for Continuing Medical Education at Harvard Medical School, and Director of Clinical Hepatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. He has approximately 100 publications and 4 specialist books to his credit. He has received numerous awards including the Excellence in Teaching Award from Harvard Medical School. With Dr. Alan Lotvin and David Fisher, he is the author of Live Better, Live Longer. He lives in Weston, Massachusetts.
David Fisher is the author of more than a dozen bestselling books, among them Gracie with George Burns, What's What, the first visual reference book, and the novel The War Magician. He has written extensively for national magazines and newspapers.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt


1
 

LISTENING
Dr. James O’Toole, the Daniels Distinguished Chair of Business Ethics at the University of Denver’s Daniels College of Business and the bestselling author of eighteen books, has become well known for his work in understanding corporate culture and the traits of leadership. “The true leader is a listener,” he wrote. “The leader listens to the ideas, needs, aspirations and wishes of the followers and then within the context of his or her own well developed system of beliefs responds to these in the appropriate fashion.”
Leadership begins with listening. In order to move forward you have to know where you are beginning, and that requires the ability to listen. Not just hear, but really listen. For many people that is not an easy thing to do. They are so excited about expressing their own thoughts and ideas that they don’t take the time to actually listen to what other people are saying.
It probably won’t surprise anyone to learn that the number-one source of quotes is the Bible, the second most quoted source is the Bard, William Shakespeare. And the third may well be Mr. or Mrs. Anonymous. There is a wonderful Turkish proverb that reminds us to “Listen a hundred times, ponder a thousand times—speak once.”
A former major league baseball player and scout named John Young grew up in the decaying section of Los Angeles known as South Central. That neighborhood had once sent a stream of African-American athletes to the major leagues, but by the early 1980s that flow had stopped. Young wondered why and started speaking to members of the community. He listened carefully to their answers. He was told that kids in that area between the ages of thirteen and sixteen quit playing baseball because after Little League there were no organized programs for them. This caused them to turn to other sports—but also to drugs and gangs. As Young learned, the same thing was happening in inner cities throughout the United States. So with little money and few resources, Young founded a program that he named RBI, Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities. From coast to coast volunteers began building baseball fields in vacant lots. Eventually major league baseball got excited about the concept and became a primary sponsor of the program. Today, in 200 American cities more than 200,000 boys and girls are participating in RBI programs. While Young used the lure of baseball to bring kids into RBI he expanded beyond the fields of dreams to include year-round educational programs, peer mentoring, and even vocational training. John Young had no special organizational skills when he founded RBI, but he recognized a problem in his community, asked questions and listened carefully to the answers, and then set out to build a program that would teach kids the skills they needed to succeed in baseball and, much more important, in life.
Leadership absolutely requires a respectful exchange of information, and that means listening as well as talking. The legendary corporate executive Lee Iacocca, who created some of the most successful models in automotive history while at Ford and then transformed Chrysler, which was on the edge of bankruptcy, into an industry leader, once lamented, “I only wish I could find an institute that teaches people how to listen. Business people need to listen at least as much as they need to talk.”
The legendary physician and author Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. was known as one of the most provocative public speakers in the nation, but even he appreciated the importance of listening, reminding people that “It is in the province of knowledge to speak, and it is the privilege of wisdom to listen.” And it was Abraham Lincoln who gave us a very important reason to simply stop talking and listen, pointing out, “It is better to be silent and be thought a fool than to speak up and dispel all doubt.”


He gave me three pieces of advice when I became provost: “Listen, listen and listen.”
—Susan Hockfield, president of MIT, on Richard Levin, president of Yale University
Ironically, listening is a skill that often has to be learned and practiced. And for some people, that’s difficult. In fact, the actress and playwright Anna Deavere Smith was hired by Yale University to teach its medical students and by New York University to teach its law students the art of listening. As she told them, “Listening is not just hearing what someone tells you word for word. You have to listen with a heart. It is very hard work.”
In his acceptance speech in November 2008, the newly elected president, Barack Obama, told a huge crowd that “I will listen to you—especially when we disagree.” And later he added, “As Lincoln said in his first inaugural address, to a nation far more divided than ours, ‘We are not enemies but friends. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection.’ And to those Americans whose support I have yet to earn, I may not have won your vote tonight, but I hear your voices. I need your help.”
The president of Yale University, Richard Levin, has become renowned for his ability to nurture academic leaders. When his provost, Susan Hockfield, was appointed president of MIT, she admitted, “He gave me three pieces of advice when I became provost: ‘Listen, listen and listen.’” And Levin himself said, “Listening is the first rule of managing.”
When we talk about listening as the key to leadership, clearly we mean more than the spoken word. Jack Welch earned a reputation as General Electric’s chairman as one of America’s most innovative and effective leaders, and he was particularly vocal about listening to new ideas. He wondered why some executives would spend a considerable amount of effort and money to assemble a great workforce—and then refuse to listen to those same people. He believed that the best thing he could do was listen with respect to those people he had hired. In fact, he created a culture at GE where people were rewarded for thinking outside the box and coming up with innovative ideas. And even when an idea failed, even if it cost the company millions of dollars, he still rewarded those people. When asked about that he said, “It is a badge of honor to get good ideas from someone else.”


Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.
—His Holiness, the Dalai Lama

 
Copyright © 2012 by Dr. Sanjiv Chopra with David Fisher

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

Introduction 1

1 Listening 19

2 Empathy 29

3 Attitude 43

4 Dreaming 55

5 Effective 81

6 Resilient 103

7 Sense of Purpose 113

8 Humility 125

9 Integrity 141

10 Packing Others' Parachutes 153

Epilogue 187

Suggested Reading 199

Index 201

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2013

    It's a very nice book many real life examples and perspectives.

    It's a very nice book many real life examples and perspectives.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)