Leading with the Heart: Coach K's Successful Strategies for Basketball, Business, and Life

( 18 )

Overview

In his more than twenty years coaching the Blue Devils, Coach Mike Krzyzewski has made his program the most admired in the nation, with back-to-back national championships in '91, '92, and again in 2001, and ten Final Four appearances since 1986. Now, in Leading with the Heart, Coach K talks about leadership-how you earn it, how you practice it, and how you use it to move your organization to the top. From the importance of trust, communication, and pride, to the commitment a leader must make to his team, this ...
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Overview

In his more than twenty years coaching the Blue Devils, Coach Mike Krzyzewski has made his program the most admired in the nation, with back-to-back national championships in '91, '92, and again in 2001, and ten Final Four appearances since 1986. Now, in Leading with the Heart, Coach K talks about leadership-how you earn it, how you practice it, and how you use it to move your organization to the top. From the importance of trust, communication, and pride, to the commitment a leader must make to his team, this inspiring book is a must-read for anyone who loves college basketball-or who simply wants to win in any competitive environment today.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Duke basketball coach Krzyzewski, today's most successful NCAA coach, reviews significant games and key events in his career in addition to offering advice to coaches, players and everyone trying to do better in life. The son of working-class Polish immigrants, he got a scholarship to West Point, where he became an accomplished player before becoming a coach. His breezy approach is direct and simple: what's most important is working as a team toward a common goal--not necessarily to win the game, but to play the best possible game. Says Coach K, "There are five fundamental qualities that make every team great: communication, trust, collective responsibility, caring and pride." Approaching each season the same way, he extends himself to his players, encouraging them to spend time at his home and with his family, while emphasizing the importance of keeping up with academics and enjoying the overall experience of college. In fact, Krzyzewski tries to hire assistant coaches who have played for him because they're versed in on- and off-court problems. At the end of each chapter, he offers general pointers, such as that "business, like basketball, is a game of adjustments. So be ready to adjust." Although he occasionally refers to a coach as a "leader," for the most part he leaves it up to readers to connect the dots between his coaching strategies and useful business strategies. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Library Journal
For six-time National Coach of the Year Krzyzewski, head coach of the Duke University Blue Devils, coaching basketball is all about leadership and team building. His first step is to recruit good people with strong character who are willing to be taught. The five fundamental qualities that he looks for in each team that he coaches are communication, trust, collective responsibility, caring, and pride. The basic principles he tries to teach each group include integrity, planning, remaining flexible in thinking and planning, always working to improve performance, and always thinking about what you are doing and how to do it better--the same principles that make a good leader or coach. Phillips is the author of several books, including Martin Luther King, Jr., on Leadership. The authors have written an excellent book on coaching and leadership principles. Recommended for most sports or coaching collections.--Terry Jo Madden, Boise State Univ. Lib., ID Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446676786
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 3/28/2001
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 70,903
  • Product dimensions: 6.25 (w) x 9.12 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Mike Krzyzewski
Mike Krzyzewski Coaching Phenom: Back-to-back NCAA national championships, seven Final Fours, and one of the most successful basketball programs in the nation are all accomplishments of Duke's head basketball coach.

Donald T. Phillips is the author of six books, including Lincoln on Leadership, The Founding Fathers on Leadership, and Martin Luther King, Jr., on Leadership. He lives in Fairview, Texas, where he currently serves as mayor.

On Leadership™is a trademark of Donald T. Phillips

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Read an Excerpt

"1Getting Organized "Too many rules get in the way of leadership. They just put you in a box. . . . People set rules to keep from making decisions." -Coach K

"The deal is the handshake. The deal is that there won't be any deals." -Coach K

"Every team I was on over my four years at Duke, he coached differently." -Grant Hill 1990-1994 on Coach K

Okay, everybody, listen up.

"We have only one rule here: Don't do anything that's detrimental to yourself. Because if it's detrimental to you, it'll be detrimental to our program and to Duke University."

As the team gathers together in our locker room for the first time, I try to get my only rule out of the way fast. I won't dwell on it because I'd rather not ruin the mo- ment. This is a great day-a day that I've been looking forward to with anxious anticipation for months. You can feel the excitement in the air. You can see the spring in everyone's step.

Even though the preseason begins around the first of September, it's really like springtime-time for the birth of a new team. All the players come in fresh. They bring whoever they are to that first meeting. They bring innocence with them. And they're ready to grow.

Looking at the young faces in front of me, I see myself more than thirty years earlier. And I think back to 1969.

"I want to tell you a story," I'll say next. "It's a story about how I first became a basketball coach. "In 1969, right after I graduated from West Point, I was assigned to Fort Carson, Colorado. One of the first things I did was begin to work out and play in my off-duty hours with the post basketball team. But my direct superior, a colonel, called me in and told me that I could not participate. He didn't like the thought of me fraternizing with the enlisted men.

"'No officer of mine is going to be wasting his time playing basketball,' he said. 'There are other things you should be doing.' "Shortly after that, I received a call from Major General Bernard Rogers, the new division commander at Fort Carson. General Rogers had just received that assignment after having served as the commandant of cadets at West Point, where, of course, he knew me as the captain of the varsity basketball team. The general had just been to a post basketball game and he called to ask why I wasn't playing with the team.

"'Sir, my colonel would rather that I not play,' I responded. 'He feels it's not a good thing for officers to do.'

"The general then went to the colonel. "'Why isn't Lieutenant Krzyzewski playing on the post basketball team?' he asked.

"When the colonel responded that he just didn't think it was good for an officer to participate, General Rogers replied: 'Well, Colonel, the question is not, "Should Lieutenant Krzyzewski be playing basketball on our team." The question is, "Should we have a team?" If the answer to that question is, "Yes, we should have a team," then we should have the best damn team we can possibly have.'

"The colonel then agreed that the post should have a basketball team. "'Well, Colonel,' said the general, 'then Lieutenant Krzyzewski will play basketball. And not only that, he will coach the team.'

"That's how I began coaching basketball. And the first year, we won the Fifth Army championship. General Rogers eventually became the Army Chief of Staff and the Supreme Allied Commander in Europe.

"But that's not why I'm telling you this story," I'll say in conclusion. "There's already been a decision made here at Duke that we're going to have a basketball team. So we're going to have the best damn team we can possibly have. That's why all of you are here today. You were recruited specifically for this purpose. Each of you is special. I don't want you to ever forget that."

Even though our first formal practice is still six weeks away, I'm already comfortable with the kids on the team. I've spent a good deal of time recruiting them from all over the country. At Duke, we search for good kids with strong character-not necessarily kids with great talent who can play, but great individuals who are willing to be part of a team and who are coachable. Some of the students have been with us for one, two, or three years-and some are incoming freshmen. I've worked hard to get to know all of them. And even if I don't yet understand every aspect of their personalities, at least I know the fabric of who they are. I like them as players and as people.

We usually have the initial meeting in our locker room because it's where we're going to be for many intimate moments in the future. So I think it's a good place for us to take that first step. In addition to the players, the rest of the team is present, including: the trainer, the team physician, the managers, my administrative assistant, and our three assistant coaches.

It's important to begin using plural pronouns right away. "Our" instead of "my." "We" instead of "I." "Us" rather than "me." I don't want the guys to be thinking this is "my" team-Coach K's team. I want them to believe it's "our" team.

The principle that "we're all important" is also something that needs to be demonstrated immediately. That's why the head coach isn't the only one who talks at this, or any other, Duke basketball meeting. Different people will speak to the players. The team trainer will discuss schedules for upcoming physicals. The team managers will say something about what they do and what is expected. Then I'll usually pop in with something like: "Just remember, the managers are part of our team-as is everyone here. Treat them right. We're all equal."

Time Management At the first meeting, we pass out notebooks and pocket calendars containing a variety of logistical items. Important dates for the upcoming semester are marked and reviewed, including things like: our first practice, the day new recruits are in town for a visit, special events at my home, and, of course, our schedule of games.

We'll also point out when fall break occurs, and when might be a good time to leave for the Christmas holidays. We'll encourage the students to plan ahead, to schedule their flights and trips well in advance so as to save money.

Time management is a lesson that the students learn through us-not only as it relates to them individually, but as it pertains to a group. In other words, we make certain that they realize right off the bat that they have responsibilities to the team as well as to themselves alone.

Academics We also really hit hard on academics. One member of our staff will talk about the students getting their schedules set up and in on time. They will be reminded to tell professors of their athletic schedules, when they have to miss class, and what they plan to do to get the materials they would miss.

Basketball players are simply not going to scrape by in their studies at Duke University. They are going to have to work. As a head coach, I personally do not want to represent a school that brings in twenty people over five years and have only two of them graduate. I expect every player we recruit to graduate. And I tell them so right up front.

We also want university life to be a total experience for them. That's one reason there are no athletic dorms on campus. They just serve to separate the athlete from the rest of the student body and rob him of the opportunity to integrate with others. To me, that's one of the most important aspects of a college education.

While it's always up to the individual student to graduate, I also believe it's incumbent upon the school to positively influence its athletes in their studies. So, throughout the year, we keep close track of how our players are progressing. Once the schedules are in, we obtain a syllabus for each course so that we know when project due dates and midterm tests will occur. As the head coach, I receive weekly updates throughout the year on significant events in each student's academic life-and then take action accordingly.

At the first team meeting, I'll take a minute to stress honor in academics. "What is the worst thing that can happen to you academically?" I'll ask. And usually someone will respond by saying, "I get an F." "No, that's not the worst thing," will be my comeback. "You can get an F even though you may try like crazy. The worst thing you can do is cheat. Now what do we mean by cheating? Well it's easy to copy off of someone else's paper, use someone else's paper, bring information into a test that you're not allowed to bring in, things like that. But let me tell you that here in the Duke basketball program, all those things are absolutely unacceptable."

And then I'll explore the issue somewhat deeper.

"Now, why would you cheat? Why would you cut corners? Well, time puts more pressure on you than anything else. That's one reason we're trying to teach you effective time management. In other words, if we know when your paper is due, we can remind you so you're not waiting until the last minute. "Fellas, don't put yourself in a position where you have to cheat. That's the worst thing you can do as a Duke basketball player. If it happens, you're going to be punished severely by the school-and I'll support that punishment, whatever it is. But we should never get to that point. If you just say to me, 'I'm stuck or I'm in trouble,' then we'll work on it together. We'll be there to help you. But you also have to learn to help yourself."

Rules At our first meeting, I give the team only one rule to live by. And it's pretty general, at that, because "not doing anything detrimental to yourself" covers a lot of things. It includes drinking at two o'clock in the morning, taking drugs, cheating in academics, and so on. Of course, the only one mentioned specifically is "no cheating." But I don't have to tell the players all the details. The upperclassmen will spend time letting the freshmen know what is expected. That, in turn, fosters additional leadership. And leadership on any team should be plural, not singular. Too many rules get in the way of leadership. They just put you in a box and, sooner or later, a rule-happy leader will wind up in a situation where he wants to use some discretion but is forced to go along with some decree that he himself has concocted.

Of course, a few leaders like to be backed up by a long list of do's and don'ts. "OOPS, you did this on the list. I got'cha." Well, I don't want to be a team of "I got'chas." I got'cha means "I" rather than "we." And a leader who sets too many rules is making it appear that it is "my" team, rather than "our" team.

The truth is that many people set rules to keep from making decisions. Not me. I don't want to be a manager or a dictator. I want to be a leader-and leadership is ongoing, adjustable, flexible, and dynamic. As such, leaders have to maintain a certain amount of discretion.

At times, there may be extenuating circumstances for a person violating a rule. Take being late for practice as an example. If a senior like Tommy Amaker, who's done everything right for nearly four years, is suddenly late for a team bus or a team meeting, I would wait a couple of minutes for him. He's built up trust by being on time over the long haul. Well, when he finally shows up, Tommy will look me in the eye and tell me why he was late. He might say, "Coach, my car broke down and I don't have a car phone. I ran all the way here." Or he might say, "Coach, I just screwed up. No excuse."

However, with a new player who has yet to build trust, I might be less flexible. I recall, for instance, when freshmen Johnny Dawkins and Mark Alarie were late for a team bus. We didn't know where they were, they had not called, and every other member of the team was on time. So we left them behind. Eventually, the two caught up to us and I remember being ready to hammer them. But after hearing that they had overslept, I began to wonder why other members of our team had not checked up on them. So I talked to the entire team about setting up a buddy system where everyone looked out for one another. "If one of us is late," I told them, "all of us are late." Now if I had punished Mark and Johnny and let that end the matter, I would never have gotten to the heart of the problem.

The fact that I don't have a hard and fast rule gives me flexibility in cases like these. It provides me thelatitude to lead. It also allows me to show that I care about the kids on my team and it demonstrates that I'm trying to be fair-minded.

When Johnny and Mark explained their situation to me, they looked me straight in the eye-and I could tell they were being truthful and sincere. Throughout the season, I look into my players' eyes to gauge feelings, confidence levels, and to establish instant trust. Most of the time, they won't quibble with me-and they certainly can't hide their feelings from what their eyes reveal. So I ask all members of our team to look each other in the eye when speaking to one another. It's a principle we live by. I know that when my wife, Mickie, and I look at each other, we know what we're going to say is the truth. And we've tried to teach our daughters, Debbie, Lindy, and Jamie, the same thing. "Look each other straight in the eye, tell the truth, full disclosure." And as our daughters have gotten older, they've really become our friends. They knew that their mom and I weren't going to chew their heads off every time they talked to us. Rather, we were going to be there for them.

Support System It was exactly this type of family environment in which I was raised-in a Polish neighborhood in Chicago where there were always flowers outside the homes, where people swept the sidewalks and the streets themselves. Whatever you had, you took care of. And, usually, the kids had more than the parents. In our neighborhood, there was total commitment to the development of the children.

My brother, Bill, and I were particularly lucky. Our dad, William, was an elevator operator in Willoughby Tower in downtown Chicago. Our mom, Emily, was a homemaker and a cleaning woman who scrubbed floors at the Chicago Athletic Club. I saw little of my dad because he worked nearly all the time and we didn't talk much. That's the way ethnic families were back then. But my mom was always, always there for me.

My parents had little in the way of material things. In fact, I remember that in my mom's closet there were always two dresses. They were clean and they were in great shape. But there were only two. My parents were people who never had anything, but they had everything. There was a lot of love and a lot of pride in our house.

It was easy for me growing up because I was always surrounded by a support system. And as I got older, I wondered what gave my mother, my father, my brother, and my best friend, Moe Mlynski, the ability to feel good about what I did. The fact is that whatever happened to me happened to them, too. The best example I can think of involves sports. I was fairly successful as a point guard in basketball when I attended Weber High School, an all-boys Catholic prep school, which, by the way, my parents paid extra money to send me to. Moe went to Gordon Tech, which was our rival. But when we'd play Gordon, Moe was always cheering for me. And when I had a good game, he'd come up to me and say, "Hey, Mick my nickname back then, that was a great game." And I could see in his eyes that he was really happy, that he really meant it.

Then Moe would drive me home. Actually, he was the only guy in our group who had a car. And during the entire ride home, he'd tell me how great I was during the game. And when I got to the house, my mom would be waiting up-not to check on me, but to talk to me a little bit. She may have even been at the game. Sometimes she'd go and not tell me and I wouldn't even realize she was in the stands.

Mom would tell me that I played a great game. "I'm very proud of you," she'd say over and over again. And then she'd ask me how I felt. Somehow, just the fact that she would wait up, that she would take the time, meant more to me than the actual conversation.

Anything that I felt good about, my mom and dad felt better about. Everything that I did was supported. I think this type of sustenance had a lot to do with me being confident as an adult. For some reason, I'm not afraid to lose. I wasn't back then, and I'm not now.

In general, I'd like to think that what my mom felt about me, I can feel about the players on our Duke basketball team. If I can provide that kind of support system for our team-where the managers feel good, the assistants feel good, the freshman feels good about the senior, and the senior about the sophomore, and so on-then we're going to be that much stronger a team. Not only that-it's a pure kind of feeling. That kind of support system-the family kind of support system-is like getting a shot to keep away jealousy. Your culture doesn't allow jealousy. That's what the best families are all about. There's real love, real caring, pride in one another's accomplishments, and no jealousy.

So we emphasize at our initial team meeting that the new guys are not just joining a basketball team, but a basketball family. We then hand out laminated cards that include the home and business phone numbers of every member of the team-including players, assistant coaches, and so on. "Carry this card around," we tell them. "And whenever you're in harm's way, make a call. If it's two o'clock in the morning and you're in trouble, someone on this card will help you. When there's a chance to make a mistake, remember that you're part of our family. Remember that you're not alone. And remember that whatever happens to you, happens to all of us." As a coach, as a leader, I'm going to provide that safety net-that family support system. And all I'm really doing is passing along something that was given to me many years ago.

A Handshake Deal Long before the first team meeting, during the recruiting process, I've made a handshake deal with every one of our players.

To each kid, I say: "I'm going to give you my best. I'm going to give you 100 percent. In return, I expect you to graduate. You'll be coming to Duke for more than just basketball. If you don't understand that, then don't come to Duke. I want you to be passionate about basketball, but I also want you to obtain a great education."

That early conversation usually works out very well. But every now and then, a new recruit will ask me to promise that he'll be a starter or that he'll get a certain amount of playing time each game. I won't do that. I'll promise him only that I'll be honest and fair-and that he'll be rewarded on his performance.

This is my "fair but not equal" policy. I'll be "fair" in everything I do, but the players won't be "equal" with regard to on-the-court playing time. If I gave everybody equal playing time, it wouldn't be fair to the team as a whole. That's because the group may be more effective if Johnny Dawkins plays thirty minutes and Tommy Amaker plays ten. It also wouldn't be fair to individual members of the team. If, through hard work and excellent performance, Dawkins demonstrates he deserves thirty minutes of playing time, he should get thirty minutes of playing time. People who deserve to do more should do more.

This handshake agreement is a clean and honest deal. There are no hidden agendas. Everything straight up front and nothing behind anybody's back. Every kid can look around the room and know that I didn't promise anyone that they'd be a starter. The deal is the handshake. The deal is that there won't be any deals.

Mutual commitment helps overcome the fear of failure-especially when people are part of a team sharing and achieving goals. It also sets the stage for open dialogue and honest conversation. Early in the preseason, I'll often have a casual conversation with one of our players about his personal life. And because we already have that commitment to each other, it's easy for us to talk. He already knows that I'm on his side and that I'll always be there for him.

The same principle holds in business when, for example, a manager walks in and talks to an employee about something other than a job assignment. It shows not only that the leader cares, but that he also might know a little something about the employee's personal life. In general, it's another way of helping people feel like they're part of the unit. I think it's very important for leaders to take time throughout the year to show they care. Ongoingcommunication reinforces the handshake.

I'm always really excited at the beginning of each first team meeting. But the exhilaration I feel being with the team causes me to be even more excited toward the end of the meeting. That's because for nearly an hour-and for the first time-I've been interacting with them as a group rather than only as individuals.

But every meeting has to end, so I usually wrap up this one by first giving the guys some advice about the coming year. For instance, I may ask them to concentrate on individual physical conditioning over the coming six weeks so that they are in really good shape by mid-October's first day of practice. And almost always, I will remind them about their studies. "It's September, fellas, and you should think about getting off to a good start academically," I'll say. "Once practice begins, things will get busy in a hurry. Remember that you'll be a better player if you're not behind in your studies."

Grant Hill once perceptively remarked that every team he played on during his four years at Duke, I coached differently. Actually, every team I've had in my coaching career, I've coached differently. That's because each year brings with it a new team, with new people who have different personalities and different skills. If I hope to get the most out of these players as a group, I have to coach them differently than previous teams. I believe that each team has to run its own race. So when I conclude our first meeting by providing a glimpse of where I think we're headed, part of what I say will depend largely on the guys sitting in the locker room. I might tell them that we're going to have a lot of fun this year, that we're going to grow as a team. Or I could tell them that we have a chance to be a really good team. Heck, I may even say that I think we can win the national championship. But whatever I tell them will be realistic and something that I believe in my heart.

By this time, I'm really anxious to get started. Not knowing how the season is going to go is stimulating for me. And the anticipation of the upcoming journey is so exciting that I get goose bumps on my arms and legs-something the players often notice. Jay Bilas, for instance, once told me that he could never remember questioning me or my commitment to the things I was saying to him and the other players. "When Coach K got those goose bumps, you knew he was not giving you some 'rah-rah' speech," said Bilas. "You can't fake goose bumps."

After gaining everyone's complete attention-so that they're all looking me straight in the eye-I will say one final thing to them. I'll say:

"I'm really looking forward to coaching every one of you this year." And am I ever.

* Recruit great individuals who are willing to be part of a team and who are coachable. * It's important to begin using plural pronouns right away: "Our" instead of "my," "we" instead of "I," "us" instead of "me." Remember that leadership on a team is not singular, it's plural. * Demonstrate the principle "we're all important" by making sure that you are not the only one speaking at a meeting. * Teach time management, not only as it relates to individuals, but as it pertains to a group. * Stress honor in all things. * Don't be a team of "I got'chas." Too many rules get in the way of leadership. * Preserve the latitude to lead. * Set up a family support system for your team. It's like getting a shot to keep away jealousy. * Hand out a laminated card with the telephone numbers of the players and staff. Remind them to call somebody when they're in harm's way. * Believe in a handshake. * Mutual commitment helps people overcome the fear of failure. * Each team has to run its own race. c 2000 by Mike Krzyzewski and Donald T. Phillips"

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Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Preseason 1
1. Getting Organized 3
2. Building Your Team 19
3. Establishing Discipline 35
4. Dynamic Leadership 51
Regular Season 65
5. Teamwork 67
6. Training and Development 85
7. Turn Negatives into Positives 103
8. Game Day 117
Postseason 133
9. Refresh and Renew 135
10. Handling a Crisis 149
11. Focus on the Task at Hand 167
12. Celebrate Tradition 185
All-Season 201
13. Blueprint Basics 203
14. The Core of Character 221
15. Friendship 237
16. Life 257
Epilogue 279
Acknowledgments 285
Index 287
About the Authors 292
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    This book gives a very insightful view on one¿s own experiences

    This book gives a very insightful view on one’s own experiences with leadership. Coach K’s experiences can be related to instances in our own lives and he shares personal details on how he responds to situations. This makes the reader feel very welcome and I know I certainly was. Coach K invites others to take up roles in leadership and gives encouragement along the way. It’s a great book for people who hope to get more out of life and to help others.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    Highly Recommnended

    What an excellent book for coaches and business executives. You could use these principles in every day life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2012

    Amazing book!!!! Definitely for Duke fans, basketball fans and really anyone

    I'm not really a non-fiction reader but this was great! One of the best books i have ever read! Definitely a must-read. Two thumbs up!!
    (\__/)
    (>'.'<)
    c((")_(") even bunny loved it!

    ~ =D smile! ~

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2009

    Must Have...

    This book is a must have for any leader. Coach K uses stories from his famed career as well as stories from outside the basketball world to create his vision of leadership. I find myself going back to this book over and over to stregthen my leadership style.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2007

    Spirit First Success Follows: Winning the most and best through playing for the team and not strictly for the win!,

    Susanne Cardwell is the wholehearted advocate of the spiritual views of Kirby Thibeault, author of Wealth ==== Leading with the Heart: Coach K`s Successful Strategies for Baseketball, Business, and Life by Mike Krzyzewski (Coach K) and Donald T. Phillips provides provocative, real-life anecdotes that capture the meaning of the spirit of winning for the team. Coach K shows that through the spirit of playing FOR the team - and not strictly for the win -- and with the spirit of those who can be considered 'the HEARTS of the TEAM,' possibilities become boundless. ==== It's not the win that defines success. It's the spirit first, through which the success follows. Sometimes the team stumbles and sometimes the team loses. Every team and every human being goes through these trials and tribulations. What defines the spirit of success, as taught to me by Kirby Thibeault, author of a book of inspirational poetry titled Wealth, and reflected in the teachings of Coach K, is the ability to overcome psychological obstacles, to see and strive for the most positive possibilities, to never give up, to look outside the 'box,' to look within, and to discover the true meaning of winning. ==== Kirby Thibeault, author of Wealth, expresses a similar perspective in his forward titled 'Wealth' when he writes 'It's realization is like that of the discovery of the divine. All that was unknown and limiting becomes clear and liberating. What was once feared becomes friendly.... It's an awakening of the spirit.' ==== Coach K delivers tips that help define the winning attitude in teams, in leadership roles, in success, in defeat, in life, and in considerations of humanity and love.' ==== Susanne Cardwell, owner/operator of Advert Marketing Solutions and avid supporter of the spiritual views of Kirby Thibeault, author of book Wealth.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2004

    Leadership is built from the ground up.

    This is one of the finest books on leadership I have read. Coach K arrived at Duke and built a winner based on 'tradition' and 'trust.' His roadmap should be a guideline for all who want to be successful leaders in any phase of life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2002

    This book applies to everything

    This is an excellent book on leadership written by someone who really knows the subject! After reading this book, you really understand why Coach K and Duke have been so successful-he know that it's the people who matter the most. Whether you are already in a leadership position or preparing yourself for a leadership position, READ THIS BOOK AND APPLY IT. You and the people around you will glad you did.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2000

    Heart warming!

    I had tears in my eyes after I read this book. Coach K ranks higher on my list of role models than anyone else (including Michael Jordan). He taught me so much in this book that I have a completely different view on life, and now have a great relationship with my parents. Anyone in any stage of their life should read this book. Because of his words he made me realize how good of a basketball player I am and how much better of a person I can be. I went from 4 points, 1 rebound, and 1 block a game to scoring 13 points, 5 rebounds, and 2 blocks a game. And for the first time in a long time I am truly happy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2000

    A must read for self evaluating your leadership qualities!

    I really enjoyed the way Coach K related his leadership as a basketball coach to that of a business leader. Effective management relies on the leader to be flexible and understand situations that require different management techniques. This book helps illustrate that philosophy. In addition, it really helps one to understand the importance of not dwelling on the negative, but on how to turn that negative into a positive...for the entire team's sake.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2000

    Yes!

    Coach K's entires succes hinges on believing in what you're doing. When his team was trailing by 1 point with 2.1 seconds left in overtime of the 1992 East Regional final, he took them into a huddle and said, 'The first thing is we're going to win. And here's how we're going to do it.' That, it in a nutshell, is this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2000

    It is the best book i ever read yet period!!!

    Leading with the heart is a wonderful book It not only teaches you basketball but life iwould recommend it to anyone!- period!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2000

    An inspirational book for all and esp. for hoop fans

    I wanted this book because I love Coach K but I found it absolutely riveting because of the way he wove in stories about players he has coached with realistic lessons about life and motivation. To my surprise, I stayed up until 1 am to finish it and I would never normally read a book on leadership. I would recommend this to almost anyone as it provides advice on working in groups and how to inspire others to work as a team. Coach K emphasizes treating people as individuals, since no one approach works on everyone. He comes across as a very caring individual who makes his players part of his own close-knit family. Go Duke!

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