The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel

( 1 )

Overview

Citizen Chauvelin, of the Committee of Public Safety, presents citizen Fouquier-Tinville, the Public Prosecutor, with the most extraordinary claim:

"The dangerous English spy known to the world as the Scarlet Pimpernel," he says, "is now safely under lock and key. He must be transferred to the Abbaye prison forthwith -- and to the guillotine as quickly as might be. No one is to take any risks this time. There must be no question either of discrediting his famous League, or of obtaining other more valuable ...

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League of the Scarlet Pimpernel

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Overview

Citizen Chauvelin, of the Committee of Public Safety, presents citizen Fouquier-Tinville, the Public Prosecutor, with the most extraordinary claim:

"The dangerous English spy known to the world as the Scarlet Pimpernel," he says, "is now safely under lock and key. He must be transferred to the Abbaye prison forthwith -- and to the guillotine as quickly as might be. No one is to take any risks this time. There must be no question either of discrediting his famous League, or of obtaining other more valuable information out of him. Such methods have proved disastrous!"

There are no safe Englishmen these days, except the dead ones -- and it will not take citizen Fouquier-Tinville much thought or time to frame an indictment against the notorious Scarlet Pimpernel . . . and that will do away with the necessity of a prolonged trial. The revolutionary government is at war with England now, and short work can be made of all poisonous spies!

English novelist and playwright Baroness Emmuska Orczy (1865-1947) achieved enduring success with her novels of politics and intrigue set during the time of the French Revolution.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781606641699
  • Publisher: Aegypan
  • Publication date: 7/29/2008
  • Pages: 200
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.46 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 8, 2013

    A while ago, from my local library, I checked out "Sovay&qu

    A while ago, from my local library, I checked out "Sovay", by Celia Rees, published by Bloomsbury, 2008. I enjoyed it, but darn if it didn't remind me of something else. "Sovay" is set during the latter part of the French Revolution/Age of Reason, so of course I thought of "Tale of Two Cities" and the "The Red and the Black". There is even a wonderful hot-air balloon scene in it that recalled "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen" to me. But none of these seemed to be quite right. Then I remembered "The Scarlet Pimpernel" and immediately upon finishing "Sovay" I re-read that.
    What a great book -- no wonder I bought it. First of all, I'm a sucker for the whole secret identity thing. Batman wouldn't be nearly so interesting without Bruce Wayne (and, even more so, vice versa). Not only does "The Scarlet Pimpernel" predate Batman, it even predates "Zorro" (upon which Batman was loosely based). As far as I can tell this was the first true duality-of-man book.
    Secondly, it is a history lesson of sorts in that it is based on actual events if not an actual person. To me, the French Revolution is one of the most confusing times in history. I understand the reasons for the beginning of the revolution, but this book takes place three years into the war when those who set out to topple tyrants have become tyrants themselves and once-clear issues become cloudy.
    Finally, it is just a well-written story. It is over a hundred years old and I've read it a few times and I'm sure I'll read it at least a few more. I know in another ten or so years, my son also will enjoy reading it.

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