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Daniel says: life caused me to grow up fast. Real fast. Like overnight.

Krista says: The real me—the one who knew I should treat Daniel the way I'd want to be treated—was angry at the other me. I just didn't want to lose Bobby by taking sides with Daniel.

Daniel and Krista used to be inseparable. Now that they're older, they've drifted apart—but when an accident leaves Daniel temporarily paralyzed, he needs his old friend more than ever. And ...

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Overview

Daniel says: life caused me to grow up fast. Real fast. Like overnight.

Krista says: The real me—the one who knew I should treat Daniel the way I'd want to be treated—was angry at the other me. I just didn't want to lose Bobby by taking sides with Daniel.

Daniel and Krista used to be inseparable. Now that they're older, they've drifted apart—but when an accident leaves Daniel temporarily paralyzed, he needs his old friend more than ever. And Krista wants to help him. Only it's not as easy as it seems, not when Krista's feelings for another boy, Bobby, keep getting in the way. And it doesn't help that Daniel and Bobby were both star swimmers—before Daniel's accident, that is. Growing up is hard on everyone, but it's up to Krista to prove how strong friendship can be.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

This sensitively wrought novel about growing pains shows how two sixth-graders in Flushing, Queens, rekindle an old friendship after a devastating accident. Through alternating viewpoints, Zalben (Hey, Mama Goose) offers an up-close, honest portrayal of her two main characters: Daniel, who is left partially paralyzed after having an allergic reaction to anesthesia, and Krista, who used to be close to Daniel but now is preoccupied with getting Daniel's best friend, Bobby, to notice her. As the story unfolds, the children's individual conflicts come to light. Daniel, once a champion swimmer, is frustrated with his slow progress in recovering the use of his legs and is distraught by his parents' bitterness towards Bobby's father (the dentist "responsible" for Daniel's paralysis). Family tensions go from bad to worse when Daniel's mother leaves the family to pursue her music dreams. Meanwhile, Krista experiences her own share of anger and dismay as she observes the blossoming romance between Bobby and another classmate, Lainie. As Daniel and Krista struggle to come to terms with changes in their lives, they find themselves drawn together. Krista agrees to help Daniel relearn how to swim and the two of them team up to work on a science project centered on a tadpole. The tadpole's metamorphosis neatly mirrors the children's internal growth as they come to terms with their losses and move forward. Eloquently expressing the power of hope and friendship, this story delivers an inspiring message. Ages 10-up. (Jan.)

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Jean Boreen
Told in alternating chapters between Krista and Daniel, this is the story of how an accident that leaves Daniel temporarily paralyzed impacts Daniel's family as well as his friendships with Krista and Bobby Kaufman, Daniel's best friend and the son of the man who caused Daniel's accident. Working with Krista's physical therapist father, Daniel gets to the point where he is encouraged to get back into the swimming pool to work on leg strength. Before the accident, Daniel was a champion swimmer, but Daniel is worried about how the others will respond to him, and it takes Krista's friendship for Daniel to recover much of his faith in himself. Various subplots follow Daniel's mother's leaving the familiar to find herself, Krista's jealousy as her friend Lainie seems to "take" the boy Krista has a crush on, and a science project that allows Daniel and Krista to realize their own feelings for each other. This is a sweet novel that deals with some of life's difficulties but does so in a way that draws the young reader in to Daniel and Krista's lives in a positive manner. This is a wonderful addition to any library.
School Library Journal
Gr 6–8
Daniel Rosen is paralyzed after a reaction to anesthesia for dental surgery, and he must learn to walk, run, and, most heart-wrenchingly for him, swim all over again. For added emotional tension, the doctor who completes the surgery is the father of his friend Bobby Kaufman. His former best friend, Krista Harris, is in love with Bobby, but Bobby is heavily in like with the sixth grade's own celebrity, Lainie Michaels. Zalben attempts to focus readers on the not-quite-over friendship between Daniel and Krista while also detailing the difficulties of Daniel's recovery, from using a walker to, potentially, competing at a swim meet. Each of the main characters also has internal family drama, including Daniel's mother, who leaves to find herself before her son is fully recovered. The author starts with a shaky, unclear premise and attempts far too much in this fairly short novel. What happened to Daniel and why and the prognosis for his recovery is not clearly explained to him, his friends, or readers. Also, these kids have more well-thought-out and expressed emotions than most seventh or eighth graders, much less sixth graders. The book has many strengths, particularly the characterizations of the parents, but as a whole it just doesn't come together.—Sarah Krygier, Solano County Library, Fairfield, CA

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Long-time picture-book author Zalben jumps back into novels with a sensitive coming-of-age story, told in alternating voices, of Krista and Daniel's first year in middle school. Daniel, a former champion swimmer, must learn to walk again after an allergic reaction to general anesthesia left him partially paralyzed; Krista must sort through her feelings for Daniel, her former inseparable elementary-school best friend, and Bobby, her first crush. Their observation and care for a science-class tadpole parallels their own successful changes and "leaps" into life, as Daniel confronts his disability with determination and accepts his mother's separation from the family. Krista realizes that there's more to see beneath everyone's facade, and the two make choices that will shape their character forever. While a few thoughts are beyond Krista and Daniel's age and experience (e.g., "Yeah, you make Chevy Chase and his falling act on the old SNL look like nothing"), Zalben understands a 'tween's range of emotions and that their friendships and first kisses are as important as solving the world's problems. (Fiction. 10-13)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375938719
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 1/9/2007
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 272
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.92 (d)

Meet the Author

Jane Breskin Zalben is the author of several novels, including Unfinished Dreams, and is also the author and illustrator of the popular Beni and Pearl picture books. She lives in Sands Point, New York.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

LEAP

One

Krista

There’s a crack in everything.

That’s how the light gets in.

“Anthem,” song by Leonard Cohen, songwriter

The best part about living on Twenty-fifth Avenue in Flushing, Queens, is that Bobby Kaufman is three blocks away on Twenty-seventh. Three blocks, not two, because there is also Twenty-fifth Road, then Twenty-sixth Avenue and Twenty-seventh. By some wonderful fluke of nature, Twenty-seventh Avenue is where the cutest boys from P.S. 79 ended up. About a half a dozen girls around my age—twelve—live on mine, including Elana Michaels. Everyone calls her Lainie. She wears fluffy vintage angora sweaters from the sixties that she found in thrift stores in the East Village, pretends that the rhinestone heart around her neck is real diamonds, and has been modeling since she was in diapers. The fancy photograph of her face hanging over the white upright piano in her living room—a piano that is rarely played—is called a “head shot.” Only her first name, Elana, and her agent’s phone number are on the bottom. (Her agent is really her mother.) Nobody in their right mind needs a Lainie living on their block.

My two best friends since the fourth grade are Sandy Doyle and Gina Deluca. Sandy and I ride our bikes every weekend. We pick up Gina along the way and head toward Twenty-seventh Avenue, which we call “the block.” Going there is more exciting than going to any other part of the neighborhood, even Carmine’s Ices, where Gina’s uncle gives us free samples of Lemon Zest and Tutti Frutti.

Just as we get to the beginning of the block, my head and chest begin to throb, half hoping the boys will be outside, the other half praying they’re not. I always do this Zen thing—take a deep breath and say to myself, Krista Harris, stay cool—but it never works. If we see any of them, instead of slowing down we pedal faster. What if one of them waved? Or actually talked to us? Still, that doesn’t stop us from going over there. Pretending we don’t notice them has become a game.

In the second half of third grade, Bobby K. noticed me. Well, maybe. On Valentine’s Day, when I came back from recess, a giant heart-shaped box of chocolates was on my chair. Bobby didn’t actually hand it to me. He stood off to the side, smiling, as if he had a secret. So how could I be 100 percent sure? It had the name Kaufman’s Fine Handmade Chocolates glimmering in gold script across the red silk lid. Bobby Kaufman’s grandfather owns a candy store on Northern Boulevard where he hand-dips chocolates as well as fruit, nuts, and almost anything else edible that doesn’t squirm. He’d probably hand-dip my little brother, Matt, if he stayed in one spot long enough.

Matt and I went through the entire two layers, biting most of them in half and putting the uneaten halves back in their little silver foil cups. We fought over the last mocha marshmallow covered in bittersweet chocolate, but I got it and didn’t split it with him. Matt was stuck with the cherry cordial, syrup oozing down his chubby chin. Even he knew at age four that kind was as disgusting as marzipan. And I knew that Bobby was as smooth as that creamy mocha one.

I saved the candy box, lining it with scrap fabric left over from a quilt my mother had been making. In it I put all my jewelry, my grandfather’s engraved pocket watch Grandma had given me after he died, and the precious note I had found hidden under the candy box lid. It was an unsigned valentine written on a piece of paper ripped from a notebook, part of a math problem scribbled at the top, folded into a small square. On a single blue line in the center, written in pencil, was one sentence: Do you love me? Next to the question were two tiny boxes. I added an x in the yes box. Was it Bobby’s handwriting? We had just learned script. What if it wasn’t? What if it was Harry Peters, who wore his retainer in school with neon rubber bands on his front teeth, slurping his s’s? And anyone who sat next to him needed heavy-duty rain gear good enough for the Amazon rain forest. Or worse, Jeremy Wainraff, who smelled like blue cheese from the lotion he applied on his dry reptilian skin. I kept the note in the candy box where I found it, the answer undelivered, so I never discovered for sure who my true secret admirer really was. If it turns out to be Bobby, I will die. I never told anyone. Not even Sandy or Gina. And I tell them everything.

Now, two and a half years later, I still have this big crush on Bobby that I can’t make go away no matter how hard I try, and trust me, I’ve tried. Big-time. If Daniel and I were still close, I might have stuffed the note in his face. I’d have asked, “Is this from your best friend?” But I can’t.

Since Daniel and I stopped being friends, there are images of him I can’t get out of my head. Daniel is sitting next to me in the sandbox on our first day of kindergarten. Someone spills sand on me and I begin to cry. Daniel leans over, flicks the grains away from my eyelids with his finger, finds a used tissue in the pocket of his overalls, and wipes the tears streaming down my cheeks. I’m impressed even at five years old. So we become inseparable. We eat lunch together. Have play dates. Pick each other for teams. By fourth grade, though, the boys began to tease him about his best friend being a girl. And the last thing Daniel wanted was to be called a sissy.

They shouted in the schoolyard, “Are you getting any? Is she your girlfriend?”

At the bus stop they poked each other in the side. “Do you do it?” I didn’t think they even knew what “it” was.

So when Coach told Daniel in gym, “Pick someone to be on your soccer team,” and Daniel walked straight past me—like I didn’t even exist, as if I were a bug to be flung off someone’s arm—and said, “Bobby,” simply because he was a boy, that was the beginning of our end. I cried myself to sleep that night. Who would I take turns with buying the next number in the mystery series we had been collecting? Match backpacks with each fall? Who would be my swim buddy at the pool club under the Whitestone Bridge? Who would be honest enough to tell me when my breath smelled like a dog? Or that I had a poppy seed from a bagel stuck in a front tooth?

The final picture I have in my mind of Daniel is a few weeks before fifth-grade graduation. It’s three o’clock. He’s surrounded by friends. His long black hair—silken as a raven’s wing—tosses in front of his eyes as he zooms past Jack’s Stationery Store on his skateboard. Daniel’s whirling, wearing his iPod. The sun is shining. Blazing on the pavement.

The next day there were the phone calls, parents trying to find out details as the news spread. With more and more calls, the story got gorier and changed from call to call.

What happened? Is it true? Is Daniel going to be okay?

My mother cried after she found out. At the dinner table. Stacking the dishes in the dishwasher. Staring out the window as she tried to draw or paint or sew.

That night as I lay in bed pretending to be asleep, I overheard my parents talking.

“He’s so talented. And bright. He had everything going for him.”

Well, he still does, doesn’t he? It’s not like Daniel’s dead or something.

A few minutes later Mom tiptoed into my room, waiting to hear me breathe like she did when I was little. Finally I said, “Ma, it’s not like it happened to me or Matt.”

“I know,” she sobbed as she sat down on the edge of my bed. A soaked handkerchief was balled up in the palm of her hand. “A single moment, and a person’s whole life can turn around.”

She held me and wouldn’t let go. That was when I felt her fear. For me, not Daniel.

And I knew I had to do something.

Top Ten List

1. Help Daniel

(without taking sides and pissing Bobby off).

2. Discover who gave me the love note—this century.

3. Find out who Bobby likes.

(Keep your fingers crossed!)

4. Try to stop the B obsession

(see numbers 1 through 3).

5. Learn to be a nicer person.

(Lain rhymes with pain.)

6. Lose at least five pounds

(even though the magazines claim #9, they say how to do #6).

7. Kiss a boy on the lips.

(Spin the Bottle at camp doesn’t count.)

8. Find out what I want most in life. Who am I?

(Simple question? Not!)

9. Accept what is.

(Yeah, right. Who came up with that big idea?)

10. Delete #9. Change.

(Easier said than done.)

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 8 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2012

    Nikki

    Oh ok. Yeah same for me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2012

    I wanna be it

    Can i

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  • Posted November 3, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Carrie Spellman for TeensReadToo.com

    Krista and Daniel were inseparable from the first day of kindergarten on. Swimming lessons, play dates, they did everything together. Until Valentine's Day in third grade. Krista got a box of chocolates and an unsigned love note. There's no way of knowing for sure who it came from, but Krista is convinced it was Bobby. It almost doesn't really even matter anymore because since that day, Krista has had the crush of her life on Bobby. Two-and-a-half years, and it hasn't gone away, and she's no closer to dating him than she was at the beginning. She should have asked Daniel about it back then, when should have equaled could have, when they were still best friends. But around the beginning of fourth grade it somehow became not cool to be best friends with someone of the opposite sex. So Krista found Sandy and Gina, and Daniel became best friends with Bobby. Krista still has the box and the note, though! <BR/><BR/>The day after the end of fifth grade changes everything for Daniel, and eventually for Krista, too. Daniel goes to have dental work done, and a freak accident happens. Now he'll need a lot of physical therapy to even get back to being functional. Who knows if he'll ever be able to be a competitive swimmer again? To make matters worse, his dentist was Bobby's dad. Which causes all sorts of problems. Add in his mom's inability to deal with the whole thing, and Daniel's not sure what his future looks like. It's a pretty tough thing to contemplate when you're only in sixth grade. <BR/><BR/>Krista vows to help her once best friend. But intending to and wanting to help are easier things to say than do. Does helping Daniel mean she's picking him over Bobby? What does helping, or not helping, say about her as a person? Why is it so hard to be around Daniel? How can she talk to him? <BR/><BR/>This story is a snapshot of a time in life that's hard enough without major obstacles. Figuring out how to relate to the opposite sex is a constant battle that starts around third grade and for some people it doesn't end for the next twenty years! It's made even harder because previous to that it was completely normal to be friends with the people that you don't even know how to talk to now. I still don't know exactly what it is that changes everything. With the accident as an obstacle, it also becomes a story about defining yourself at any age. A person's actions and reactions say a lot about who they are, but they can also easily be misinterpreted. <BR/><BR/>This book deals with a confusing time in life, but it does so very openly and honestly. It could very easily have gotten depressing, or melodramatic, or lost in a message. Thankfully it never does. Instead you walk away from it feeling like you got a glimpse into life from a full perspective. Like for the first time you got to see the full picture of a piece of time. It's a good thing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2008

    Great plot. . .ho hum delivery

    This was a book I hated to hate, but my loathing seemed to grow with every page. It wasn¿t the plot. The plot was unique and thought provoking. Daniel Rosen goes to Dr. Kaufman (the father of one of Daniel¿s friends) for a routine dental procedure¿the removal of an errant tooth¿and, through a freak accident, is paralyzed from the waist down. The accident changes everything for Danny and his family. Krista has been Danny¿s best friend for years but, alas, the changes of sixth grade boy-girl dynamics have come between the two of them. Krista is surrounded by a cadre of friends: Lainie the wannabe movie star, Gina, the tough Italian who answers to no one, and Sandy, the all around girl. They learn a lot about life, relationships, and love based on how they respond to Danny¿s misfortune. The events are recounted alternately through Daniel¿s and Krista¿s perspectives. This story falls down in a couple of critical areas. First, it is syrupy sweet in its description of family and interpersonal interactions. Like a sitcom, members get angry with each other, but quickly make peace and much kissing, hugging, and cuddling ensues. Pesky younger brothers are recognized as the angels they are and teachers are friends who stand with the students against the stupidity of substitutes. Daniel is miraculously¿okay, it involves hard work on his part and the support of his friends--able to swim competitively again. . .and they all lived happily ever after. Second, the story consistently uses anachronistic references that will leave younger readers confused. For example, Krista, this thoroughly modern sixth grader (one who uses cell phones, e-mails, and IM) refers to herself and her friend as Laurel and Hardy. At a party, one of the characters does a Groucho Marx impression. The story is pockmarked with instances of ¿knocking knuckles.¿ The end result is the story is not true to the voices of its characters. Instead, it sounded like an older adult trying to imagine what a sixth grader would feel. It¿s just not believable. There are authors out there who have done a superb job in this area and have done so without obscenity, so it¿s difficult to make allowances even in that area. The only other redeeming feature (besides the plot line) I could find was the inspirational quotation that started every chapter.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2007

    Courtesy of Teens Read Too

    Krista and Daniel were inseparable from the first day of kindergarten on. Swimming lessons, play dates, they did everything together. Until Valentine's Day in third grade. Krista got a box of chocolates and an unsigned love note. There's no way of knowing for sure who it came from, but Krista is convinced it was Bobby. It almost doesn't really even matter anymore because since that day, Krista has had the crush of her life on Bobby. Two-and-a-half years, and it hasn't gone away, and she's no closer to dating him than she was at the beginning. She should have asked Daniel about it back then, when should have equaled could have, when they were still best friends. But around the beginning of fourth grade it somehow became not cool to be best friends with someone of the opposite sex. So Krista found Sandy and Gina, and Daniel became best friends with Bobby. Krista still has the box and the note, though! The day after the end of fifth grade changes everything for Daniel, and eventually for Krista, too. Daniel goes to have dental work done, and a freak accident happens. Now he'll need a lot of physical therapy to even get back to being functional. Who knows if he'll ever be able to be a competitive swimmer again? To make matters worse, his dentist was Bobby's dad. Which causes all sorts of problems. Add in his mom's inability to deal with the whole thing, and Daniel's not sure what his future looks like. It's a pretty tough thing to contemplate when you're only in sixth grade. Krista vows to help her once best friend. But intending to and wanting to help are easier things to say than do. Does helping Daniel mean she's picking him over Bobby? What does helping, or not helping, say about her as a person? Why is it so hard to be around Daniel? How can she talk to him? This story is a snapshot of a time in life that's hard enough without major obstacles. Figuring out how to relate to the opposite sex is a constant battle that starts around third grade and for some people it doesn't end for the next twenty years! It's made even harder because previous to that it was completely normal to be friends with the people that you don't even know how to talk to now. I still don't know exactly what it is that changes everything. With the accident as an obstacle, it also becomes a story about defining yourself at any age. A person's actions and reactions say a lot about who they are, but they can also easily be misinterpreted. This book deals with a confusing time in life, but it does so very openly and honestly. It could very easily have gotten depressing, or melodramatic, or lost in a message. Thankfully it never does. Instead you walk away from it feeling like you got a glimpse into life from a full perspective. Like for the first time you got to see the full picture of a piece of time. It's a good thing. **Reviewed by: Carrie Spellman

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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