Learn Ancient Greek

Learn Ancient Greek

2.7 4
by Peter Jones
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Based on the same principles as Learn Latin, Peter Jones's bestselling book of the hugely popular Daily Telegraph series, this book teaches you enough Greek in 20 chapters to be able to read some real ancient Greek – one of the world's greatest languages, used by one of the world's greatest cultures. By the end of the course you will be able to read

Overview

Based on the same principles as Learn Latin, Peter Jones's bestselling book of the hugely popular Daily Telegraph series, this book teaches you enough Greek in 20 chapters to be able to read some real ancient Greek – one of the world's greatest languages, used by one of the world's greatest cultures. By the end of the course you will be able to read passages from the New Testament and from Classical Greek literature, including extracts from Socrates' speech on trial for his life recorded by Plato, Sophocles' Antigone, and the tragic end to the Athenian expedition to Sicily described by the historian Thucydides – and much else.

Each chapter also comes with sections on ancient Greek history and culture, and on the influence of the ancient language on our own, enabling you to experience at first hand just why it is that the ancient Greeks have played such a central part in the culture, language and history of western civilisation.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780715627587
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Publication date:
04/24/1998
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
421,045
Product dimensions:
5.34(w) x 8.52(h) x 0.67(d)

Meet the Author

Peter Jones, co-founder of the Friends of Classics, is one of the best-known figures in the teaching and appreciation of the Classics, a regular contributor to national newspapers and the author of many books and articles, including, in the same series, Learn Latin.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Learn Ancient Greek 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a well organized beginner's guide to ancient Greek that I have used effectively with many students. The grammar is laid out in clearly understandable terms, even for people who do not have a solid grasp of the technical elements of grammar. Grammatical concepts are introduced a bit at a time, so the student is not overwhelmed with detail. The book covers all Greek dialects from about the 6th century BC to the post-Alexandrian Koine; this covers just about everything from late writers as Plutarch nearly to early authors such as Homer. Because of this, Greek dialects are mixed into the book with some freedom, and the student is not constrained to learning a single dialect at a time. Diacritical marks are covered in the text (the first one is covered in chapter two). However, these are not useful to learning the 'correct pronunciation' of ancient Greek, as there is no certainty what that is. The author settles on a convention that is accepted by most scholars, without getting into the hard-fought details of Greek pronunciation, which obviously differed from dialect to dialect. As far as effectiveness goes, this book can't be beat. Even people who think themselves linguistically incompetent will have a very good chance of success with this book. You can't beat the price. Buy this as your self-taught introduction, and get a more complicated course after you are done if you want to learn ancient Greek in more detail.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
As anything written by Peter V. Jones, it is full of wit and culture - and Greece is as much as Rome our alma mater ! But the accents are missing ...
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is confusingly written, and is a bad introduction to a wonderful language. The lighthearted, joking tone of this text results in incomplete explanations of grammatical concepts, and creates a lot of confusion. Additionally, some bizarre decisions on the part of the author will cause great confusion for any student trying to read real Greek. For example, the author frequently mixes elements of classical Greek with the Koine (biblical) Greek of several centuries later. And, most astonishingly, the author chooses not to include accent marks in his Greek, except where one word might be confused with another. As a beginner, accent marks are crucial to learning the correct pronunciation of ancient Greek, and in distinguishing various forms of words from one another. In short, stay away from this book. Far better introductory texts are available.