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Learn How to Program Using Any Web Browser: Using Any Web Browser
     

Learn How to Program Using Any Web Browser: Using Any Web Browser

4.5 2
by Harold Davis, Gary Cornell (Foreword by)
 

Learn How to Program Using Any Web Browser is a book about general principles of good programming practice for complete novices. Whether you're just starting to get curious about what makes a computer work, or an office worker who has been using computer applications for years and would like to spend some time delving deeper into what makes them tick, this

Overview

Learn How to Program Using Any Web Browser is a book about general principles of good programming practice for complete novices. Whether you're just starting to get curious about what makes a computer work, or an office worker who has been using computer applications for years and would like to spend some time delving deeper into what makes them tick, this book is for you.

Learn How to Program Using Any Web Browser will teach you the basics of programming using JavaScript. JavaScript can be written using any text editor, and displayed in almost any Web browser, regardless of operating system. Despite the unfortunate word "script" in the language name, in actuality, JavaScript is a modern programming language.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590591130
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
10/29/2003
Edition description:
2004
Pages:
410
Product dimensions:
7.52(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.04(d)

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A bio is not available for this author.

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Learn How to Program Using Any Web Browser: Using Any Web Browser 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Davis has chosen a novel approach to teaching programming to a novice. This book merely assumes that you have access to a browser on your computer. It doesn't even need Internet access, though that doesn't hurt. Davis shows how by editing simple text files, you can cobble together HTML pages and JavaScript code within those pages. You are taught JavaScript. It has many of the features of any langugage. Conditional expressions, loops, etc. He has produced a nice, minimalist approach. An experienced programmer might quibble about the limitations of JavaScript. But what the heck. If you are new at programming, you'll easily learn all the key ideas here. Plus, you'll pick up some useful knowledge of HTML along the way. Given the ubiquity of the Web, knowing both HTML and JavaScript can be quite useful, jobwise. Also, you can compare the differences in coding HTML and JavaScript. The former is declarative, the latter procedural. Davis doesn't seem to go into this, but his approach lets you learn both styles.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are two types of programming books: the lifeless tome that painfully explains every rule and property in a programming language, but never explains how to use it, or the book that shows numerous programming examples, but never explains the language.

'Learn How to Program Using Any Web Browser' by Harold Davis is an exception. His book explains Javascript's rules, properties and methods and gives wonderful examples using Javascript. But the purpose of his book goes beyond learning Javascript, it's an introduction to learn any object-oriented programming language, like C or Java. Harold explains in simple, plain English how to create objects, how to use them and¿more importantly¿why use them.

There's a great advantage in learning how to program: modern web sites are dynamic and interactive because of programming and web pages are built from a database because of them. Programming is the edge a web designer needs to compete in today's crowded market.

Harold's book explains the power and benefits of Objects like no other programming book I've read. I own books on Javascript, Applescript and RealBasic, and none of them helped me to understand Objects. They all gloss over the subject, because the authors either can't explain them to readers not already programmers or falsely think everyone already understands the concept.

Harold's writing is fun and easy to understand. I learned more than how to make simple image roll-overs, I learned how to build complex web applications. I now take advantage Javascript in other applications too, like Adobe® Acrobat®, Photoshop®, Illustrator® to name some. And I'm learning Java.

I recommend this book to any one who is a web designer or graphic designer, or just wants to learn programming.