Learning for a Diverse World: Using Critical Theory to Read and Write about Literature / Edition 1

Learning for a Diverse World: Using Critical Theory to Read and Write about Literature / Edition 1

by Lois Tyson
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0815337744

ISBN-13: 9780815337744

Pub. Date: 08/01/2001

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Lois Tyson explains the basic concepts of six critical theories in popular academic use today-psychoanalytic, Marxist, feminist, gay/lesbian, African-American, and post-colonial-and shows how they can be employed to interpret five short literary works in the book.

Overview

Lois Tyson explains the basic concepts of six critical theories in popular academic use today-psychoanalytic, Marxist, feminist, gay/lesbian, African-American, and post-colonial-and shows how they can be employed to interpret five short literary works in the book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780815337744
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
08/01/2001
Series:
Garland Reference Library of the Humanities Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.70(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

Preface for Instructors
Acknowledgments
1. Critical Theory and You
What Does Critical Theory Have to Do with Me?
What Will I Learn about Critical Theory from this Book?
Three Questions about Interpretation Most Students Ask
Why Feeling Confused Can Be a Good Sign
2. Using Concepts from Reader-Response Theory to Understand Our Own Interpretations
Discovering the Role of Our Personal Responses
How Our Personal Responses Can Help or Hinder Interpretation
Using Our Personal Responses to Generate Paper Topics
3. Using Concepts from Psychoanalytic Theory to Understand Literature
Why Should We Learn about Psychoanalytic Theory
Basic Concepts
Interpretation Exercises
Analyzing Character's Dysfunctional Behavior: Interpreting "Everyday Use"
Analyzing a Character's Insanity: Interpreting "A Rose for Emily"
Analyzing Dream Images in Literature: Interpreting "" started Early—Took my Dog"
Analyzing a Character's Self-Healing: Interpreting "Don't Explain"
Using Psychoanalytic Concepts in Service of Other Theories: Interpreting "The Battle Royal"
Food for Further Thought
4. Using Concepts from Marxist Theory to Understand Literature
Why Should We Learn about Marxist Theory?
Basic Concepts
Interpretation Exercises
Analyzing the Operations of Capitalism: Interpreting "Everyday Use"
Analyzing the Operations of the American Dream: Interpreting "The Battle Royal"
Analyzing the Operations of Classism: Interpreting "A Rose for Emily"
Resisting Classism: Interpreting "Don't Explain"
Learning When Not to Use Marxist Concepts: resisting the Temptation toInterpret "I started Early-Took My Dog"
Food for Further Thought
5. Using Concepts from Feminist Theory to Understand Literature Why Should We Learn about feminist Theory?
Basic Concepts
Interpreting Exercises
Rejecting the Objectification of Women: Interpreting "The Battle Royal"
Resisting Patriarchal Ideology: Interpreting "Don't Explain"
Analyzing a Conflicted Attitude toward Patriarchy: Interpreting "Everyday Use"
Analyzing a Sexist Text: Interpreting "A Rose for Emily"
Analyzing Patriarchy's Psychological Oppression of Women: Interpreting "I started Early-Took my Dog"
Food for Further Thought
6. Using Concepts from Gay and Lesbian Theory to Understand Literature
Why Should We Learn about Gay and Lesbian Theory?
Basic Concepts
Interpreting Exercises
Resisting Lesbian Stereotypes: Interpreting "Don't Explain"
Analyzing Homophobia: Interpreting "The Battle Royal"
Analyzing a Gay or Lesbian Subtext: Interpreting "Everyday Use"
Using Queer Theory: Interpreting "A Rose for Emily"
Drawing upon Context: Interpreting "I started Early-Took My Dog"
Food for Further Thought
7. Using Concepts from African American Theory to Understand Literature
Why Should We Learn about African American Theory?
Basic Concepts
Interpretation Exercises
Analyzing the Operations of Institutionalized Racism: Interpreting "The Battle Royal"
Understanding the Operations of Internalized Racism: Interpreting "Everyday Use"
surviving "Less Visible" Forms of Racism: Interpreting "Don't Explain"
Analyzing the Function of Black Characters in White's Literature: Interpreting "A Rose for Emily"
Learning When Not to Use African American Concepts: Resisting the Temptation to Interpret "I started Early-Took my Dog
Food for Further Thought
8. Using Postcolonial Concepts to Understand Literature
Why Should We Learn about Postcolonial Theory?
Basic Concepts
Analyzing Colonialist Ideology: Interpreting "The Battle Royal"
Analyzing the Colonial Subject: Interpreting "Everyday Use"
Analyzing the Influence of Cultural Categories: Interpreting "A Rose for Emily"
Analyzing Anti-Colonialist Resistance: Interpreting "Don't Explain"
Understanding the Colonization of Nature: Interpreting "I started Early-Took my Dog
Food for Further Thought
9. Holding on to What You've Learned
A Shorthand Overview of Our Six Critical Theories
A Shorthand Overview of Our Literary Interpretation Exercises
A Shorthand Overview of the Range of Perspectives Offered by Each Theory
Critical Theory and an Ethics for a Diverse World
Taking the Next Step
Appendices
Appendix A: "I started Early-Took My Dog" (Emily Dickinson, c. 1862)
Appendix B: "A Rose for Emily" (William Faulkner, 1931)
Appendix C: "The Battle Royal" (Ralph Ellison, 1952)
Appendix D: "Everyday Use" (Alice Walker, 1973)
Appendix E: "Don't Explain" (Jewelle Gomez 1987)
Index

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