Learning From International Public Management Reform

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Overview

Governments around the world are criticized as inefficient, ineffective, too large, too costly, overly bureaucratic, overburdened by unnecessary rules, unresponsive to public needs, secretive, undemocratic, invasive into rights of citizens, self-serving, and failing in provision of the quantity and quality of services desired by the taxpaying public. Fiscal stress has plagued many governments, increasing the cry for less costly or just less government. Critics have exerted sustained pressure on politicians and public managers for transformational reform. Recommendations for change have included application of market and economic logic and private sector management methods to government. Managerial reform has been promoted on grounds that the public sector is organized and functions on many of the wrong principles and needs reinvention and renewal. Government reforms in response to reformist pressures have included restraint of spending and tax cuts, sales of public assets, privatization and contracting-out of services, increased performance measurement and auditing, output and outcomes based budgeting, and new accounting and reporting methods. Reform has been accompanied by promises of smaller, less interventionist and more decentralized government, improved efficiency and effectiveness, greater responsiveness and accountability to citizens, increased choice between public and private providers of services, a more 'entrepreneurial' public sector capable of cooperating with business. While it is apparent why politicians and elected officials often support new managerial methods, observers wonder whether the promises of reform can be delivered upon to provide benefits depicted soattractively. Dialogue on this question is active among public management scholars, practitioners, politicians, citizen groups and the media. Substantial elements of this dialogue are represented in this book.

Governments around the world are criticized as inefficient, ineffective, too large, too costly, overly bureaucratic, overburdened by unnecessary rules, unresponsive to public needs, secretive, undemocratic, invasive into rights of citizens, self-serving, and failing in provision of the quantity and quality of services desired by the taxpaying public. Fiscal stress has plagued many governments, increasing the cry for less costly or just less government. Critics have exerted sustained pressure on politicians and public managers for transformational reform. Recommendations for change have included application of market and economic logic and private sector management methods to government. Managerial reform has been promoted on grounds that the public sector is organized and functions on many of the wrong principles and needs reinvention and renewal. Government reforms in response to reformist pressures have included restraint of spending and tax cuts, sales of public assets, privatization and contracting-out of services, increased performance measurement and auditing, output and outcomes based budgeting, and new accounting and reporting methods. Reform has been accompanied by promises of smaller, less interventionist and more decentralized government, improved efficiency and effectiveness, greater responsiveness and accountability to citizens, increased choice between public and private providers of services, a more 'entrepreneurial' public sector capable of cooperating with business. While it is apparent why politicians and elected officials often support new managerial methods, observers wonder whether the promises of reform can be delivered upon to provide benefits depicted soattractively. Dialogue on this question is active among public management scholars, practitioners, politicians, citizen groups and the media. Substantial elements of this dialogue are represented in this book

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Papers from a March 2000 conference held at Macquarie University, Australia, look at lessons learned from public management reform in Australia and New Zealand. Some subjects are public sector management in the state of Victoria 1992-99, the impact of new public management on the reform of the transportation infrastructure in Sydney, and lessons from Australian and New Zealand experiences with accrual output-based budgeting. Other topics include performance reporting for accountability purposes, the imposition of new public management in the New Zealand state education system, and information policy in New Zealand. Jones teaches in the Department of Systems Management at the Naval Postgraduate School. This work lacks a subject index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Part A
List of Tables and Figures ix
List of Contributors xi
Preface xiii
Chapter 1. Learning from International Public Management Reform Experience 1
I. Learning from Reform in Australia
Chapter 2. Australia, the Oecd and the Post-NPM World 29
Chapter 3. Public Sector Management in the State of Victoria 1992-1999: Genesis of the Transformation 45
Chapter 4. Public Management Reform: Some Lessons from the Antipodes 61
Chapter 5. The Impact of New Public Management on the Reform of the Transportation Infrastructure in Sydney 77
Chapter 6. Lessons from Australian and New Zealand Experiences With Accrual Output-Based Budgeting 89
II. Learning from Reform in New Zealand
Chapter 7. The Challenge of Evaluating Systemic Change: The Case of Public Management Reform in New Zealand 103
Chapter 8. Reflections on Public Management Reform in New Zealand 133
Chapter 9. New Zealand Experience With Public Management Reform--or Why the Grass is Always Greener on the Other Side of the Fence 143
Chapter 10. Public Management Reform and Lessons from Experience in New Zealand 161
Chapter 11. Effectiveness: The Next Frontier in New Zealand 177
Chapter 12. Performance Reporting for Accountability Purposes: Lessons, Issues, Future 193
Chapter 13. Getting Better But Feeling Worse? Public Sector Reform in New Zealand 211
Chapter 14. Observations on the Imposition of New Public Management in the New Zealand State Education System 233
Chapter 15. Network Structures, Consumers and Accountability in New Zealand 257
Chapter 16. Information Policy in New Zealand 279
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