Learning From Media (Hc)

Overview

Clark (educational psychology, U. of Southern California) presents 18 chapters, 15 of which he authored or coauthored, which both lay out the evidence for his argument that "media are mere vehicles that deliver instruction but do not influence student achievement any more that [sic] the truck that delivers our groceries causes changes in our nutrition." and offer counterviews and arguments against his "mere vehicles" theory. After the presentation of the debate, specific research related to distance education ...
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Overview

Clark (educational psychology, U. of Southern California) presents 18 chapters, 15 of which he authored or coauthored, which both lay out the evidence for his argument that "media are mere vehicles that deliver instruction but do not influence student achievement any more that [sic] the truck that delivers our groceries causes changes in our nutrition." and offer counterviews and arguments against his "mere vehicles" theory. After the presentation of the debate, specific research related to distance education technologies and other media instructional technologies is presented. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Preface
1 Media Are "Mere Vehicles": The Opening Argument 1
2 Questioning the Meta-analyses of Computer-based Instruction Research 13
3 Why Should We Expect Media to Teach Anyone Anything? 37
4 International Views of the Media Debate 71
5 What About Multi-Media Effects on Learning? 89
6 Do Media Aid Critical Thinking, Problem Solving or "Learning to Learn"? 103
7 A Summary of the Disagreements with the "Mere Vehicles" Argument 125
8 Robert Kozma's Counterpoint Theory of "Learning With Media" 137
9 Kozma Reframes and Extends His Counter Argument 179
10 A Review of Kozma and Clark's Arguments 199
11 The Media versus Methods Issue 205
12 Are Methods "Replaceable"? A Reply to Critics in the ETRD Special Issue on the Debate 219
13 New Directions: An Argument for Research-based Performance Technology 227
14 New Directions: How to Develop "Authentic Technologies" 241
15 New Directions: Cognitive and Motivational Research Issues 263
16 New Directions: Evaluating Distance Education Technologies 299
17 New Directions: Equivalent Evaluation of Instructional Media: The Next Round of Media Comparison Studies 319
18 What Is Next In The Media and Methods Debate? 327
App Richard Clark: A Biography 339
Index 347
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