Learning Theories: An Educational Perspective / Edition 5

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $24.47
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 80%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $24.47   
  • New (2) from $63.48   
  • Used (10) from $24.47   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$63.48
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(613)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Hardcover New 0132435659.

Ships from: Greer, SC

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$145.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

This book provides succinct, complete overviews of all current behavioral and cognitive theories and presents their implications for learning and instruction. It covers motivation and self-regulation and contains a new chapter on development and learning. In addition to theory, it gives equal treatment to the applications of principles and concepts of teaching and learning. For educators and school administrators.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780132435659
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 7/24/2007
  • Series: Pearson Custom Education Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 592
  • Product dimensions: 7.51 (w) x 9.29 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Meet the Author

Dale H. Schunk is Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Stanford University, a M.Ed. from Boston University, and a B.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana. He has held faculty positions at Purdue University (where he served as Head of the Department of Educational Studies), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (where he also was Chair of the Academic Affairs Institutional Review Board), and the University of Houston.

Dale has edited six books, is co-author of Motivation in Education: Theory, Research, and Applications (Prentice Hall, 2008) and has authored over 80 articles and book chapters. He has served as President of Division 15-Educational Psychology for the American Psychological Association and as Secretary of Division C-Learning and Instruction for the American Educational Research Association. He is presently a member of the editorial boards of three professional journals.

Dale's teaching and research interests include learning, motivation, and self-regulation. He has received the Early Career Contributions Award in Educational Psychology from the American Psychological Association, the Albert J. Harris Research Award from the International Reading Association, and the Outstanding Service Award from the Purdue University School of Education

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Learning: Introduction, Issues, Historical Perspectives 1
2 Behavioral Theories 29
3 Social Cognitive Theory 83
4 Information Processing 136
5 Cognitive Learning Processes 190
6 Cognition and Instruction 241
7 Constructivism 285
8 Motivation 329
9 Content-Area Learning 389
10 Development and Learning 434
Glossary 479
References 489
Author Index 519
Subject Index 527
Read More Show Less

Preface

Theory and research on human learning have expanded dramatically in recent years. This point is underscored by considering some of the topics addressed in this text that were not covered in the first edition published in 1991: constructivism, situated cognition, implicit theories, brain development, apprenticeships, peer collaboration, distance education, and E-learning. The relevance of each of these topics to human learning is now firmly established. Better integration with education of such disciplines as psychology, human development, and instructional technology has contributed to the expansion of the field of learning.

Despite all these changes, the primary objectives of this fourth edition remain the same as those of the previous three editions: (a) to inform students of learning theoretical principles, concepts, and research findings, especially as they relate to education, and (b) to provide applications of principles and concepts in settings where, teaching and learning occur. Although different theories of learning are discussed, the text continues to focus on cognitive perspectives. This focus is consistent with the contemporary emphasis on learners as seekers and constructors of knowledge rather than as reactors to events.

STRUCTURE OF THIS TEXT

The text's 10 chapters are organized as follows. In the introductory chapter, I discuss learning theory-, research, and issues, as well as historical foundations of the study of learning and the relation of learning to instruction. The end of this chapter includes three scenarios involving elementary, secondary, and college classes. Throughout the text these scenarios are used todemonstrate applications of principles of learning, motivation, self-regulation, and instruction. Chapter 2 presents behavioral theories of learning. Current cognitive and constructivist views of learning are covered in subsequent chapters: social cognitive theory (Chapter 3); information processing (Chapter 4); cognitive learning processes (Chapter 5); cognition and instruction (Chapter 6); and constructivism (Chapter 7). The final three chapters cover topics relevant to learning: motivation (Chapter 8); content-area learning (Chapter 9); and development and learning (Chapter 10).

NEW TO THIS EDITION

Readers familiar with prior editions will notice several content and organizational changes in this fourth edition, which reflect evolving theoretical and research emphases. Constructivism, which has become a major guiding framework in content learning and human development, is now covered in a separate chapter, although parts of this chapter—such as Vygotsky's theory—were included in prior editions. To provide better integration of self-regulation and instruction with learning theories, these topics now are integrated within each of the theory chapters rather than appearing as stand-alone chapters. This change reflects the increasing tendency of researchers from different theoretical traditions to investigate how learning principles apply to instructional contexts and students' efforts to self-regulate their academic actions. One exception is Chapter 6, cognition and instruction. This chapter stands alone because of the sheer amount of material relevant to the topic. Separate chapters on motivation and development and learning remain for the same reason, although discussions of these topics are intermingled in other chapters. Chapter 10—development and learning—has been substantially revised and now includes sections on familial and sociocultural influences on learning and brain development. These additions, like the other changes in this volume, reflect the increased interest among educators in these topics and an expanding research base on their role in human learning. Rapid developments in technology necessitated further refocusing of the section on technology and instruction (now in Chapter 6), and the continued growth of research relevant to learning resulted in more than 175 new references added to this edition—most of which were published in the last 5 years.

This edition continues to provide many examples of learning concepts and principles applied to settings where learning occurs. Each chapter gives informal examples in text and detailed applications. Many of the latter are set in the scenarios described in Chapter 1. Most of the applications pertain to school-age learners, but applications to younger and older students and to nonschool settings also are included.

The text is intended for use by graduate students in education or related disciplines, as well as by upper-level undergraduates interested in education. I assume that most students have taken a prior course in education or psychology and work in an educational capacity or anticipate pursuing an educational career. In addition to courses on learning, the text is appropriate for any course that covers learning in more than a cursory fashion—for example, courses on motivation, educational psychology, human development, and instructional design.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Theory and research on human learning have expanded dramatically in recent years. This point is underscored by considering some of the topics addressed in this text that were not covered in the first edition published in 1991: constructivism, situated cognition, implicit theories, brain development, apprenticeships, peer collaboration, distance education, and E-learning. The relevance of each of these topics to human learning is now firmly established. Better integration with education of such disciplines as psychology, human development, and instructional technology has contributed to the expansion of the field of learning.

Despite all these changes, the primary objectives of this fourth edition remain the same as those of the previous three editions: (a) to inform students of learning theoretical principles, concepts, and research findings, especially as they relate to education, and (b) to provide applications of principles and concepts in settings where, teaching and learning occur. Although different theories of learning are discussed, the text continues to focus on cognitive perspectives. This focus is consistent with the contemporary emphasis on learners as seekers and constructors of knowledge rather than as reactors to events.

STRUCTURE OF THIS TEXT

The text's 10 chapters are organized as follows. In the introductory chapter, I discuss learning theory-, research, and issues, as well as historical foundations of the study of learning and the relation of learning to instruction. The end of this chapter includes three scenarios involving elementary, secondary, and college classes. Throughout the text these scenarios are used to demonstrateapplications of principles of learning, motivation, self-regulation, and instruction. Chapter 2 presents behavioral theories of learning. Current cognitive and constructivist views of learning are covered in subsequent chapters: social cognitive theory (Chapter 3); information processing (Chapter 4); cognitive learning processes (Chapter 5); cognition and instruction (Chapter 6); and constructivism (Chapter 7). The final three chapters cover topics relevant to learning: motivation (Chapter 8); content-area learning (Chapter 9); and development and learning (Chapter 10).

NEW TO THIS EDITION

Readers familiar with prior editions will notice several content and organizational changes in this fourth edition, which reflect evolving theoretical and research emphases. Constructivism, which has become a major guiding framework in content learning and human development, is now covered in a separate chapter, although parts of this chapter--such as Vygotsky's theory--were included in prior editions. To provide better integration of self-regulation and instruction with learning theories, these topics now are integrated within each of the theory chapters rather than appearing as stand-alone chapters. This change reflects the increasing tendency of researchers from different theoretical traditions to investigate how learning principles apply to instructional contexts and students' efforts to self-regulate their academic actions. One exception is Chapter 6, cognition and instruction. This chapter stands alone because of the sheer amount of material relevant to the topic. Separate chapters on motivation and development and learning remain for the same reason, although discussions of these topics are intermingled in other chapters. Chapter 10--development and learning--has been substantially revised and now includes sections on familial and sociocultural influences on learning and brain development. These additions, like the other changes in this volume, reflect the increased interest among educators in these topics and an expanding research base on their role in human learning. Rapid developments in technology necessitated further refocusing of the section on technology and instruction (now in Chapter 6), and the continued growth of research relevant to learning resulted in more than 175 new references added to this edition--most of which were published in the last 5 years.

This edition continues to provide many examples of learning concepts and principles applied to settings where learning occurs. Each chapter gives informal examples in text and detailed applications. Many of the latter are set in the scenarios described in Chapter 1. Most of the applications pertain to school-age learners, but applications to younger and older students and to nonschool settings also are included.

The text is intended for use by graduate students in education or related disciplines, as well as by upper-level undergraduates interested in education. I assume that most students have taken a prior course in education or psychology and work in an educational capacity or anticipate pursuing an educational career. In addition to courses on learning, the text is appropriate for any course that covers learning in more than a cursory fashion--for example, courses on motivation, educational psychology, human development, and instructional design.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)