Learning to Be Irish

( 2 )

Overview

Daire Arlen is immature and arrogant and doesn't appreciate that perhaps her grandfather left her more than a house in Northern Ireland. He left her a passport to her heritage, a chance to draw the curtain back on the past, on the place where she came from, to learn how to make happiness with harp strings and a pocketful of emeralds. He just might have left her the one man who could teach her what it meant to be Irish.
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Learning To Be Irish

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Overview

Daire Arlen is immature and arrogant and doesn't appreciate that perhaps her grandfather left her more than a house in Northern Ireland. He left her a passport to her heritage, a chance to draw the curtain back on the past, on the place where she came from, to learn how to make happiness with harp strings and a pocketful of emeralds. He just might have left her the one man who could teach her what it meant to be Irish.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781451500998
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 2/17/2010
  • Pages: 194
  • Product dimensions: 5.06 (w) x 7.81 (h) x 0.41 (d)

Meet the Author

Emjae considers herself a professional romantic, but don't call her work romantic fiction. Like everyone else around Inknbeans, she prefers the term contemporary relationship fiction. She started writing fiction for her grandmother more than twenty years ago, and only recently decided to pick up quill and ink and begin again, after toiling far too long as a technical writer.

She lives in a little castle on a hilltop in Southern California with the demanding and indifferent Lord Mogwollen, her collection of tea pots, crochet hooks and coffees from around the world. She is the last living Dodgers fan.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2012

    Great sweet story

    Just read it yourself. It is a wonderfully told sweet love story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 14, 2012

    One of the best books ever!

    For those who know me, they know that I don't give away my top praises for just something merely good. I read Learning To Be Irish because I have some Irish heritage and the title intrigued me. I had no real expectations either good or bad. I have read hundreds of books, many that I loved, but I can say without hesitation that Learning To Be Irish was one of the best books I have ever read in my life.

    The story is about Daire Arlen (pronounced Dara), an Irish American, who inherits a house from her Grandfather Arlen in a town in Northern Ireland called Arlenhill. Obviously, her family had something to do with founding the town. When Daire arrives, she finds the ways of the people archaic and puzzles over the language barrier even though they seem to be speaking English some of the time, not to mention the awkward introduction to the young man who has been renting the house. It is the emotional struggle she gets involved with (and I won't say how) between this young man and her that glued me to the book.

    I am not a fan of romantic fiction. However, I can't really classify this book as a true Romance Novel because the relationships she builds in Arlenhill are very real, not based on some fantasy dream love, but very easily could have been real people.

    Edwards hits the nail on the head in her depiction of our fiery Irish moods and our sometimes prideful thoughts. This book was truly worth my time and I enjoyed it immensely. It cemented the realization in me that even though I am Irish and Cherokee and I have never been to Ireland, I must have already learned to be Irish myself. Once you read the book, you will understand what that means. Kitty Sutton - Author of Wheezer And The Painted Frog

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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