Learning to Stand and Speak: Women, Education, and Public Life in America's Republic by Mary Kelley, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Learning to Stand and Speak: Women, Education, and Public Life in America's Republic

Learning to Stand and Speak: Women, Education, and Public Life in America's Republic

by Mary Kelley
     
 

Education was decisive in recasting women's subjectivity and the lived reality of their collective experience in post-Revolutionary and antebellum America. Asking how and why women shaped their lives anew through education, Mary Kelley measures the significant transformation in individual and social identities fostered by female academies and seminaries.

Overview

Education was decisive in recasting women's subjectivity and the lived reality of their collective experience in post-Revolutionary and antebellum America. Asking how and why women shaped their lives anew through education, Mary Kelley measures the significant transformation in individual and social identities fostered by female academies and seminaries. Constituted in a curriculum that matched the course of study at male colleges, women's liberal learning, Kelley argues, played a key role in one of the most profound changes in gender relations in the nation's history: the movement of women into public life.

By the 1850s, the large majority of women deeply engaged in public life as educators, writers, editors, and reformers had been schooled at female academies and seminaries. Although most women did not enter these professions, many participated in networks of readers, literary societies, or voluntary associations that became the basis for benevolent societies, reform movements, and activism in the antebellum period. Kelley's analysis demonstrates that female academies and seminaries taught women crucial writing, oration, and reasoning skills that prepared them to claim the rights and obligations of citizenship.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
A landmark publication in American women's history. . . . Will guide scholarship on early America's free women and learning for years to come.—William and Mary Quarterly

Ambitious and fascinating. . . . Women's voices are vibrantly present.—Journal of American History

A fresh interpretation of the place of education, reading, and voluntary association in American women's lives between the Revolution and the Civil War.—New England Quarterly

Offers fresh and significant insights into literature and literacy, education and social identity, region and nation, gender and access to learning among American women of earlier eras.—Legacy

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807830642
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
09/04/2006
Series:
Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia Series
Edition description:
1
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.20(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Mary Kelley provides a pathbreaking interpretation of the new and expanding spaces for female education between the Revolution and the Civil War. She demonstrates with wonderful clarity how women used the written and spoken word to play a defining role in transforming American civil society from an eighteenth-century domain of civility to a nineteenth-century arena of purposeful social action. A landmark book.—John Brooke, Ohio State University

Meet the Author

Mary Kelley is Ruth Bordin Collegiate Professor of History, American Culture, and Women's Studies at the University of Michigan. She is author, coauthor, or editor of six books, including Private Woman, Public Stage: Literary Domesticity in Nineteenth-Century America, The Limits of Sisterhood: The Beecher Sisters on Women's Rights and Woman's Sphere, and The Power of Her Sympathy: The Autobiography and Journal of Catharine Maria Sedgwick.

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